Latest News

Cultivating Chinese orchids could conserve wild species

Asking people who want to buy orchids about their preferences when choosing which plants to buy has revealed that many unknowingly buy wild, possibly endangered orchids, when they would be just as happy to buy commercially grown plants that meet their preferences for colour and price.

Publication date: 25 May 2018

Tidal range power plants hold potential for electricity generation

In theory, one third of global electricity needs could be provided by the world’s tidal range, according to a new comprehensive state-of-the-art review of tidal range power plants.

Publication date: 21 May 2018

Sacred sites have a biodiversity advantage that could help world conservation

Since the dawn of history, human societies have ascribed sacred status to certain places. Areas such as ancestral burial grounds, temples and churchyards have been given protection through taboo and religious belief. As many of these places have been carefully managed for many years an interesting side effect has occurred – the sites often retain more of their natural condition than surrounding areas used for farming or human habitation. As a result, they are often called “sacred natural sites” (SNS).

This article by John Healey, Professor of Forest Sciences, Bangor UniversityJohn Halley, Professor of Ecology, University of Ioannina, and Kalliopi Stara, Postdoctoral Researcher, University of Ioannina was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 17 May 2018

Reefs that experience high frequency temperature variability most likely to resist coral bleaching

As scientists and conservationists race to work out the best way to conserve the world’s coral reefs, a new study reveals why some reefs appear to be more resistant to coral bleaching during ocean warming events and calls for higher-resolution data to be collected.

Publication date: 30 April 2018

How can we communicate all that nature does for us?

As a conservation professor I believe people need to understand why protecting nature matters to them personally. Appealing to human self-interest has generated support for conservation in Switzerland, for example, where the government protects forests partly because they help prevent landslides and avalanches, or among communities in Botswanawhich conserve wildlife partly because of the value of trophy hunting. But this understanding risks being obscured by unhelpful arguments over terminology.

Publication date: 27 April 2018

Bangor University extends student Peer Guide Awards

Bangor University’s innovative Peer Guiding scheme, which enables second and third year students to support new students, has extended its Award ceremony to three Awards this year.

Publication date: 27 April 2018

Bangor weightlifters bring home the gold

Bangor University students secured podium positions at the British University and College Weightlifting Championships which took place at St Mary’s University, Twickenham recently.

Publication date: 25 April 2018

Women in Science Scholarships Awarded

Two ‘Women in Science’ Scholarships have been awarded to outstanding Bangor University students – Hannah Davies and Lily Stokes. Both were undergraduate students at Bangor and graduated with First Class Honours in July 2017. The scholarships, which cover the full course fees, will enable the talented and enthusiastic students to continue their studies and the recipients of these scholarships are now enrolled in postgraduate research courses at Bangor.

Publication date: 26 March 2018

Working to safeguard the public against viruses and antibiotic resistant bacteria

Scientists working to reduce risk the risks to the public from exposure to viruses and antibiotic resistant bacteria in the water environment are meeting to share their research and discuss next steps today (14 March at the Royal Geographic Society, London).

Publication date: 14 March 2018

Distinguished Bangor Alumnus leaves generous legacy to Agricultural Botany

John Trevor Williams (PhD Agricultural Botany, 1962) made an enormous contribution towards conserving the genes of the world’s food crops and has now ensured his legacy goes even further by leaving a £75,000 bequest to support Agricultural Botany at Bangor University.

Publication date: 8 March 2018