Latest News

Six common misconceptions about meditation

Dusana Dorjee, Bangor University Meditation has been hailed as a way to boost mental health, help chronic pain, reduce stress and build a new appreciation for the world around us. 

Publication date: 19 March 2018

Bangor researchers contribute to advancing dementia research strategy

Dr Gill Windle and Emeritus Professor Bob Woods, of the Dementia Services Development centre, part of BIHMR in the School of Healthcare Sciences were part of the Alzheimer’s Society taskforce of leading UK clinicians and researchers in dementia, UK funders of dementia research, people with dementia and carer representatives developing the first ‘dementia research roadmap for prevention, diagnosis, intervention and care by 2025’.

Publication date: 23 February 2018

Knowing how and where to look reduces driving risks

Training young and new drivers so that they pay attention to their peripheral vision could reduce road traffic accidents. Road traffic accidents are one of the leading causes of death globally and young novice drivers are the most likely to be involved.

Publication date: 21 February 2018

Martial arts can improve your attention span and alertness long term – new study

Martial arts require a good level of physical strength, but those who take up training need to develop an incredible amount of mental acuity, too.

Mental strength is so important to martial arts that researchers have found karate experts’ stronger punching force may be down to a better control of muscle movement in the brain, rather than increased muscular strength. Other studies have also found that children who practice Taekwondo improved in maths test scores, and behaviour.

This article by Ashleigh Johnstone, PhD Researcher in Cognitive Neuroscience, at te School of Psychology was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 20 February 2018

Bangor Psychology Student wins BBC Wales Young Sportswoman of the Year 2017 Award

A first year Bangor University Psychology student has won the BBC Wales Carwyn James Young Sportswoman of the Year 2017 award.

Publication date: 6 December 2017