Latest News

Why PrEP takers should still use condoms with HIV+ partners

Condoms have been the mainstay of safer sex messages for 30 years as the best way of reducing HIV transmission. In 2012, however, the US food and drug administration licensed a drug to prevent people from contracting HIV, which had previously only been used to treat the infection. This small blue pill was called Truvada, and so pre-exposure prophylaxis (or PrEP) was born. By this stage, evidence of the safety and effectiveness of Truvada in reducing HIV transmission was already strong, especially among men who have sex with men. The US decision to licence the drug was quickly followed by World Health Organisation guidelines also supporting the use of Truvada for PrEP, not as an alternative to condom use, but rather as part of a broader HIV prevention approach that included condoms.

This article by Simon Bishop, Lecturer in Public Health and Primary Care, School of Healthcare Sciences was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 12 December 2017

Yoga in the workplace can reduce back pain and sickness absence

Back pain is the single leading cause of disability in the world. In the US, four out of every five people experience back pain at some point in their life. In the UK, back pain is one of the most common reasons for visits to the doctor, and missed work. In fact, absence from work due to back problems costs British employers more than £3 billion every year.

But there is a potentially easy way to prevent this problem: yoga. Our new research has found that exercises from the ancient Indian practice can have very positive benefits for back problems. Our findings suggest that yoga programmes consisting of stretching, breathing, and relaxation methods can reduce sickness absence due to back pain and musculoskeletal conditions.

Publication date: 8 December 2017

Strong Bangor University contingent at 2018 Commonwealth Games

Bangor University Staff, students and alumni have been selected to represent Wales at next year’s Gold Coast Commonwealth Games.

Publication date: 7 December 2017

Research partnership projects under the spotlight

Some exciting projects involving Bangor University academics working in partnership with communities, charities, government bodies, and businesses – both local and international – are being highlighted at Bangor University this Friday (8 December).

In all, seventeen of 52 projects funded through an ESRC (Economic and Social Research Council) Impact Acceleration Account at Bangor University are featured at the event.

Publication date: 7 December 2017

Tears and laughter as young and old share experiences

Over recent months, in care centres across Wales, an innovative social experiment has been taking place - and the results are astonishing.

In a new series of three emotional programmes on S4C, starting Sunday, 10 December, Hen Blant Bach shows what can happen when six children share their day care with a group of pensioners - and the potential transformational effects it can have.

Publication date: 7 December 2017

Bangor Psychology Student wins BBC Wales Young Sportswoman of the Year 2017 Award

A first year Bangor University Psychology student has won the BBC Wales Carwyn James Young Sportswoman of the Year 2017 award.

Publication date: 6 December 2017

Bangor academic gives expert evidence to House of Lords

A Bangor academic presented evidence to the House of Lords Home Affairs Select Committee recently. Professor Michael Rees of the School of Medical Sciences was called to give expert evidence on the potential effects of the UK leaving the Euratom treaty, established to coordinate Europe’s civil nuclear energy industry following the creation of the European Economic Community in 1957, and the implications for patient care and research as a result.

Publication date: 5 December 2017

Feeding time at the robotic petting zoo

A ‘petting zoo’ with a difference is coming to Pontio Arts & Innovation Centre, Bangor University between 4 - 10 December.

It will be feeding time at the ‘zoo’ - but instead of goats or lambs, the  public will be able to interact with and feed ‘animals’ with a difference- in the shape of little vacuuming robots, each one with a distinct personality and all vying for special ‘robot food’ from the public.

Publication date: 1 December 2017

Generous nursing students prepare to spread festive cheer for Wrexham patients

Student nurses from Bangor University will be bringing some additional Christmas cheer to patients at Wrexham Maelor Hospital again this year.

Publication date: 1 December 2017

Exercise alone does not lead to weight loss in women – in the medium term

This article by Hans-Peter Kubis, Director of the Health Exercise and Rehabilitation Group, School of Sport, Health and Exercise Sciences was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 23 November 2017

Exploring the economics of sight-saving technology

Over two million people in the UK are living with sight loss. This will double to nearly four million people by 2050 as the population ages and underlying causes like obesity and diabetes increase. This places huge pressure on NHS eye care services. 

The 2016 Royal National Institute for the Blind (RNIB) report highlighted that sight loss is estimated to cost over £28 billion to the UK economy.

Research into new sight-saving technology could improve the lives of people at risk of sight loss and provide saving to the NHS and wider economy.

Two researchers from Centre for Health Economics and Medicines Evaluation CHEME,  are co-investigators on the optical coherence tomography (OCT) study, which has been awarded £1.3 million of funding from the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Invention for Innovation (i4i) Programme. 

Publication date: 23 November 2017

Different types of alcohol elicit different emotional responses

Different types of alcohol elicit different emotional responses,  but spirits are most frequently associated with feelings of aggression, suggests research published in the online journal BMJ Open.

Publication date: 22 November 2017

Why we taught psychology students how to run a marathon

This article by , PhD Researcher in Behavioural and Positive Psychology, Bangor University, was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Mike Fanelli, champion marathon runner and coach, tells his athletes to divide their race into thirds. “Run the first part with your head,” he says, “the middle part with your personality, and the last part with your heart.” Sage advice – particularly if you are a third year psychology student at Bangor University, preparing for one of the final milestones in your undergraduate experience: running the Liverpool Marathon.

Publication date: 14 September 2017

Documenting three good things could improve your mental well-being in work

This article by Kate Isherwood, PhD Student, at the School of Psychology, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

The UK is facing a mental health crisis in the workplace. Around 4.6m working people – 64% of the British population – suffer from either depression or anxiety. In total, 25% of all EU citizens will report a mental health disorder at some point in their lives.

Publication date: 4 September 2017

Career change leads to First Class Honours and a ‘job in the profession that I love’!

Adult Nursing graduate Natasha Rowe from Llansantffraid, Powys, obtained a Law Degree and then went on to work as a legal assistant.  She soon discovered that her passion was helping others and enrolled on the Adult Nursing degree course.  This week she will be graduating with a First Class Honours degree.

Publication date: 19 July 2017

Graduation time for Olympic Weightlifter

One of Bangor University’s elite athletes is celebrating a different kind of achievement this week and has swapped the medal podium for the graduation stage.

Publication date: 19 July 2017

Graduation time for ChildLine volunteer

A former Cardiff High School pupil graduates from Bangor University this week, having embraced the vast array of opportunities available.

Publication date: 18 July 2017