Modules for course 3P3Q | BA/FSEL
BA Film Studies and English Literature

These were the modules for this course in the 2017–18 academic year.

You can also view the modules offered in the years: 2018–19; 2019–20.

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Year 1 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • QXE-1013: Reading, Thinking, Writing (20)
    The course will include analytical reading of drama, prose, poetry and film in English from the medieval period to the present era; an introduction to critical and theoretical approaches to the reading of literature; integration of close textual study and critical/theoretical approaches, as the foundation for all other modules in the School; practical development of skills of literary commentary, essay writing, and critical discussion.
  • UXS-1063: Film History (20)
    This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the link between film technologies, narratives, styles, genres, and subjects, and the societies in which film circulates. Lectures will introduce students to a range of important changes which have influenced the development of the filmic medium. The course will help students to situate the selected films in their cultural, , generic, and technological context. Lectures cover topics such as: Genre (Western, Screwball Comedy, Sport, Epic...), Narrative structure, Early Cinematic Milestones, The Introduction of Sound, Classical Hollywood Studio System, Asian Post-War Cinema, Italian Neo-Realism. Weekly screenings illustrate issues covered in lectures and associated readings, and will provide a case study for weekly workshops. Films/shorts to be screened may include: Le Voyage dans la Lune (Méliès, 1902), Man with a Movie Camera (Vertov, 1929), M (Lang, 1931), Blackmail (Hitchcock, 1929), Der Blaue Engel (Von Sternberg, 1930), Citizen Kane (Welles, 1941), Roma, Città Aperta (Rossellini, 1945), Rashomon (Kurosawa, 1950), Ladri di Biciclette (De Sica, 1948), À bout de soufflé (Godard, 1960), Memento (Nolan, 2000), There Will Be Blood (Anderson, 2007).
  • UXS-1065: Film Criticism (20)

Semester 2

  • UXS-1062: Film Language (20)
    This module provides students with a toolkit for the analysis of the moving image and aims to provide students with a technical vocabulary to enable them to analyse and to discuss how films communicate meaning. The individual elements of this toolkit are analysed in detail. Lectures cover topics such as: Mise-en-Scene, Editing, Camerawork, Sound, Lighting, and Style. Weekly screenings illustrate relevant aspects of film form. Films to be screened may include: A Man Escaped (Bresson, 1956), The Innocents (Clayton, 1961), City of God (Meirelles, 2002), Atonement (Wright, 2007), Bourne Ultimatum (Greengrass, 2007). The Red Shoes (Powell & Pressburger, 1948), and Moulin Rouge! (Luhrman, 2001)
    or
    UXC-1062: Iaith y Ffilm (20)
    Mae'r cwrs hwn yn fodd o alluogi myfyrwyr i ddysgu hanfodion dadansoddi'r ddelwedd symydol. Bydd myfyrwyr ar y cwrs yn dysgu terminoleg dechnegol a fydd yn eu cynorthwyo i ddadansoddi a dehongli y modd y mae ffilm yn cyfathrebu ystyr. Bydd darlithoedd unigol yn trafod pynciau megis Mise-en-Scene, Montage, Gwaith Camera, Sain, Goleuo ac Arddull Weledol. Bydd dangosiadau o ffilmiau perthnasol yn cael eu cynnal yn wythnosol, er mwyn cyflwyno engrheifftiau o'r pynciau dan sylw. Bydd y ffilmiau a ddangosir yn cynnwys: A Man Escaped (Bresson, 1956), The Innocents (Clayton, 1961), City of God (Meirelles, 2002), Atonement (Wright, 2007), Bourne Ultimatum (Greengrass, 2007). The Red Shoes (Powell & Pressburger, 1948), ac Moulin Rouge! (Luhrman, 2001)

Optional Modules

40 credits from:

  • QXE-1003: Intro. to Medieval Literature (20) (Semester 2)
    Introduction to Medieval Literature offers students the opportunity to study a variety of Old English literature that is evocative of the intricate decoration on the Staffordshire Anglo-Saxon hoard; riddles, Old English battle poetry and The Dream of The Rood (taught in translation). In the second part of the module students will encounter Middle English drama, romance poetry and Chaucerian verse in its original language. The transition between the Old to the Middle English period will be analysed in terms of specific themes and motifs, such as the development from pagan Germanic heroism to Christian values. Chivalry, the comic and bawdy, and piety will be the main foci in the Middle English part of the course, explored through a range of poetry, prose, drama and life writing. This module is an ideal ‘taster’ for the medieval literature modules available at levels two and three.
  • QXE-1004: The Literature of Laughter (20) (Semester 1)
    The module is organised on a chronological basis, moving from Chaucer to Monty Python and beyond, taking in on the way a selection of texts by Shakespeare, Wycherley, Pope, Swift, Austen, Dickens, Twain, as well as Kate Atkinson’s Behind the Scenes at the Museum and an anthology of comic verse. The lectures place the texts in their historical and cultural contexts, while the seminars and study groups focus on the week’s specified text for close reading and discussion. Both the lectures and the smaller groups are consistently concerned with the module’s over-riding questions about the nature of literary laughter. Concepts such as wit and satire are analysed, along with some of the recurring topics of humorous writing: religion, politics, sex and gender. The major functions of laughter – for stereotyping, for self-defence, for reform, rebellion, or release of tension – are highlighted for both their continuity and their difference in specific literary and cultural contexts.
  • QXE-1014: The Gothic in Literature/Film (20) (Semester 2)
    This introductory course focuses mainly on Gothic writing from the late eighteenth century onwards, although it begins by looking at examples of the medieval and early-modern grotesque that help to set early Gothic novels in context. Organized in a loosely chronological way, this module is particularly sensitive to the ways in which Gothic texts have been used to represent contemporary cultural anxieties (such as the New Woman in the last quarter of the nineteenth century, or New Technology in the early years of the twenty-first), but it will also examine how the Gothic has been used to articulate political resistance, for example in anti-imperialist, post-colonial, and feminist works. It will also pay particular attention to the Gothic as a visual form, both analysing the representation of Gothic spaces in eighteenth and nineteenth-century literature and art, and investigating the importance of the genre to the development of cinema, from silent-era German expressionism to the present. While the precise topics covered by the module will vary from year to year, themes will include some of the following: Terror and the Sublime; Monstrosity and Deviance; Doubles and Doppelgängers; Vampires and Sexualities; Parody and Pastiche; Domesticity and ‘The Uncanny’; Cybergothic and the Post-human; Feminist and Postcolonial Rewritings; Gothic and the Young Adult Novel. Students will situate texts within their historical and political contexts, and will also gain an awareness of a range of important theories (from Freud’s notion of the Uncanny to Derrida’s theories of hauntology) that will be important to the study of literature in the rest of their degree.
  • QXE-1015: Landmarks in Literature (20) (Semester 2)
    The specific texts studied will vary from year to year, but the module will include nineteenth-century works (e.g. Edgar Allan Poe, Arthur Conan Doyle); English ‘classical’ stories of the early twentieth century (e.g. Agatha Christie); American ‘hard boiled’ versions (e.g. Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler), and modernist, postmodernist and other variants (e.g. Jorge Luis Borges, Sara Paretsky, Walter Mosley, Paul Auster). Film and television adaptations may also be included. The module will also situate the texts in relevant historical and cultural contexts, and explore them via key concepts in literary theory.
  • QXE-1016: Children's Fiction (20) (Semester 1)

Year 2 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 2

Optional Modules

60 credits from:

  • QXE-2003: Jonson to Johnson (20) (Semester 2)
  • QXE-2005: Victorian Literature (20) (Semester 2)
    The Victorians lived in an era of change and contradictions: a culture in which some reaped immense rewards from mechanised industry, but feared the idea of 'mechanism'; a period which saw the growth of cities and democracy, but was attracted to images of medieval feudalism. These themes will be examined, along with: realism in the Victorian novel; the narrators of the Victorian novel; ideas of truth in art and fiction; the figure of the intellectual or 'sage'; the domestic sphere; children and orphans; women as writers and members of Victorian society; the important relationship between notions of scientific 'truth' and religious 'faith', and ideas of nationality and race as expressed in the work of Irish, Scottish and Welsh authors working within concepts associated with the British empire. This course looks at a broad range of texts including novels, poetry and essays. Authors studied may include Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Gaskell, Charlotte Bronte, John Ruskin, Robert Browning, Alfred Tennyson, Christina Rossetti, Robert Stevenson, Bram Stoker and Oscar Wilde.
  • QXE-2013: Renaissance and Reformation (20) (Semester 1)
    This course offers an introduction to the `Golden Age¿ of English literature, an exciting period of cultural change which encompasses the Reformation, the rise of a culture of individualism, and the English Revolution of the 1640s and 1650s. Among the modes of writing produced in these turbulent circumstances are poetic forms such as songs, sonnets, epigrams and pastoral epic; dramatic genres such as revenge tragedy and city comedy; and prose works such as autobiographical confessions, pamphlets and fiery sermons. Texts week 1. William Shakespeare, Henry V 2. Philip Sidney, Apology for poetry and all sonnets in Norton from Astrophil and Stella 3. Christopher Marlowe, The Jew of Malta 4. Edmund Spenser, book 1 of The Faerie Queene (in Norton) 5. William Shakespeare, Othello 6. John Webster, The Duchess of Malfi (in Norton) 7. reading week 8. John Donne, Songs and Sonnets, the Elegies,and the Holy Sonnets (all those in the Norton) 9. George Herbert and Henry Vaughan (all poems in the Norton) 10. John Milton, Paradise Lost (books 1-4, in Norton) 11. John Dryden, The Conquest of Granada 12. Etheridge, The Man of Mode Editions ¿ no preference.
  • QXE-2019: Contemporary Writing (Lit) (20) (Semester 2)
    ‘Contemporary Literatures’ introduces students to the first postmodern texts in the 1950s, and takes them right up to literature from the present day. The course asks students to investigate how literature (across a range of genres) responds to the broad historical trends and specific events of the age. While these might include residual literary traditions from the 1950s such as the theatre of ‘angry young men’ and ‘Movement’ poetry, the module will initially focus on the emergence of postmodernity. It will go on to consider how the Anglophone literary field has became more international in the second half of the twentieth century, witnessing the emergence of national literary traditions in a range of former colonies. New and contemporary movements and traditions in Anglophone literature will be explored in the second part of the course. These might include British Asian literature, post 9/11 literature, recent American drama, eco-poetry and the effect on literature of recent digital innovation.
  • QXE-2020: The Romantic Period in Britain (20) (Semester 1)
    The Romantic Period (c. 1785 -1832) was marked by social change, political strife and a growth in print culture. In many ways it was the start of the modern age, as Britain sought to define itself both internally and within a global context. This course introduces students to both canonical and non-canonical texts of the period and the ways in which they both shaped and reflected wider social and cultural concerns. It will guide students through key areas of current scholarship of the period so that they may refine their understanding of the relationship between texts and their contexts. In order to question what the term ‘Romanticism’ may entail, this course focuses not only on certain authors and texts from this period but also what may be termed Romantic spaces, including the home, nation, metropolis (both London and Edinburgh will feature prominently), border spaces, natural or picturesque settings (including Tintern Abbey and nearby Snowdon), reading rooms, theatres, the boxing ring and galleries.
  • QXE-2024: Alfred Hitchcock (20) (Semester 2)
    Alfred Hitchcock is perhaps the most notable example of a director whose films were popular both with audiences and with critics seeking to establish the credibility of film as an art form. His work provides a case-study of theories of authorship; of different national cinemas and studio systems, and of a particular genre, the thriller. In addition, the popularity and accessibility of Hitchcock’s films also raise questions concerning narrative, spectatorial pleasure, the gaze, and gender, and consequently provide an opportunity to explore the interrelation and limits of film theory and film practice
  • QXE-2027: Literature and Modernity (20) (Semester 1)
    Literature and Modernity examines literature about, or by writers from, Britain and Ireland in a period bracketed by the emergence of proto-modernist writing in the late 1890s and the emergence in the early 1950s of texts that would later be seen as postmodern. This period in Western Europe witnessed unprecedented changes in the modes of production, in relations between the sexes and between the classes, and in the development of new cultural forms like radio and cinema. While these originated in the Victorian period, they were accelerated by the social and psychological impact of the First World War, global depression, the rise of fascism, another catastrophic World War and the start of the nuclear age, historical factors that make the study of literature from this period especially rewarding. Students will study some of the ways in which authors responded to these cataclysmic shifts by considering work from a range of critical perspectives. These may include the literary movement (for example, modernism), broad historical change (for example, changes in gender roles), a major historical event (for example, the Second World War), genre, or recent trends in criticism which encourage us to look at this period’s writing from a new angle.
  • QXE-2101: Beowulf to Malory (20) (Semester 1)
    Seminar list/lecture list Week 1 Historical and Cultural Overview of the Old English Period Week 2 Beowulf Week 3 The Old English Elegies Week 4 Christian Heroes Week 5 Chaucer: Canterbury Tales: General Prologue and the Franklin's Prologue and Tale Week 6 Chaucer: the Nun's Priest's Prologue and Tale Week 7: NO LECTURES OR SEMINAR Week 8 Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Week 9 Malory, The Morte Darthur, I Week 10 Malory, The Morte Darthur, II Week 11 Henryson (photocopies to be provided) Week 12 NO LECTURES; revision seminar
  • Students must take (at least) 1 module dealing with Literature before 1800, and 1 from post-1800 modules.

40 credits from:

  • LXG-2008: The German Film (20) (Semester 1)
    This module will examine a selection of nine German films reflecting key themes in German cinema, from its beginnings to the present day. Students will be provided with an introduction to the history of German cinema, and will develop a detailed knowledge of the films examined both as historical documents and as cinematic texts. Whilst certain attention will be paid to cinematographic devices and the different movements associated with German cinema, the module will also explore the chosen films in a far wider context, examining the social and historical events surrounding the creation of the films, thus broadening students' knowledge of German history and culture. Primary Sources: Films: Das Cabinet des Dr Caligari, dir. by Robert Wiene (1919) M: Eine Stadt sucht einen Mörder, dir. by Fritz Lang (1931) Triumph des Willens, dir. by Leni Riefenstahl (1935) Angst essen Seele auf, dir. by Rainer Werner Fassbinder (1973) Der Himmel über Berlin, dir. by Wim Wenders (1987) Lola rennt, dir. by Tom Tykwer (1998) Good Bye Lenin!, dir. by Wolfgang Becker (2003) Das Leben der Anderen, dir. by Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck (2006) Recommended Reading Bergfelder, Tim, et al., The German Cinema Book (London: BFI, 2002) Cooke, Paul, German Expressionist Films (Harpenden: Pocket Essentials, 2002) Elsaesser, T., New German Cinema: A History (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1989) Ginsberg, T. and K.M. Thompson (eds), Perspectives on German Cinema (New York: G.K. Hall, 1996) Hake, Sabine, German National Cinema (London: Routledge, 2002) Brockmann, Stephen, A Critical History of German Film (Rochester, NY: Camden House, 2010).
  • QXE-2024: Alfred Hitchcock (20) (Semester 2)
    Alfred Hitchcock is perhaps the most notable example of a director whose films were popular both with audiences and with critics seeking to establish the credibility of film as an art form. His work provides a case-study of theories of authorship; of different national cinemas and studio systems, and of a particular genre, the thriller. In addition, the popularity and accessibility of Hitchcock’s films also raise questions concerning narrative, spectatorial pleasure, the gaze, and gender, and consequently provide an opportunity to explore the interrelation and limits of film theory and film practice
  • UXS-2025: Stanley Kubrick: Auteur (20) (Semester 1)
    Topics that will be covered in this module include all of Kubrick’s films, as well as how these intersect with events such as World War One, the Holocaust, the Cold War and the Vietnam War and such issues as science, technology, history, race, violence, gender, ethnicity, sexuality and war.
  • LXS-2033: The Cinema of Spain (20) (Semester 2)
    Spanish cinema and its pioneers Neorealism and political dissent in the 1950s (Luís Buñuel, Viridiana) Art house cinema in the 1960s (Víctor Erice, El espirítu de la colmena) The cinema of the transition: the `disenchantment¿ Popular genres in post-Franco Spain The Spanish film industry in the 1980s and 1990s Gender and sexuality is post-Franco cinema (Pedro Almodóvar, Hable con ella) Catalan and Basque cinema (Julio Medem, Tierra) The internationalization of Spanish cinema (Alejandro Amenábar, Mar adentro) Social realism at the turn of the century (Fernando León, Los lunes al sol) Women in contemporary Spanish cinema (Icíar Bollaín, Te doy mis ojos) The films are available in the School of Modern Languages DVD library. Primary Films: Luis Buñuel, Viridiana (1961) Víctor Erice, El espíritu de la colmena (1973) Pedro Almodóvar, Volver (2006) Agustí Villaronga, Pa negre (2010) Icíar Bollaín, Te doy mis ojos (2003) Recommended reading: Bentley Bernard P. E., A Companion to Spanish Cinema (London: Tamesis, 2008) Caparrós Lera, José María, El cine español de la democracia: de la muerte de Franco al "cambio" socialista (1975-1989) (Barcelona: Anthropos, 1992) Deveny, Thomas, Cain on Screen: Contemporary Spanish Cinema (Lanham: Scarecrow Press, 1999) D'Lugo, Marvin, Guide to the Cinema of Spain (Westport: Greenwood Press, 1997) Fiddian, Robin W. and Peter W. Evans, Challenges to Authority: Fiction and Film in Contemporary Spain (London: Tamesis Books, 1988) Jordan, Barry and Rikki Morgan-Tamosunas, Contemporary Spanish Cinema (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1998) Pavlovi, Tatjana, 100 years of Spanish Cinema (Malden: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009) Triana-Toribio, Nuria, Spanish National Cinema (London: Routledge, 2003) Resina Joan Ramon (ed.), Burning Darkness: a Half Century of Spanish Cinema, ed. (Albany: SUNY Press, 2008)
  • UXS-2050: Race & Gender (20) (Semester 2)
    Topics to be looked at will include, Senegalese Cinema, representing prostitution, women in photography, race and gender in performance art, representing women on film, women and genre, Women and horror, women and action, Australian Visual Culture, Aboriginal female film makers, remembering the slave trade, post-colonialism, neo-colonialism and representation, how we define ‘white’.
  • UXS-2059: Understanding Documentary (20) (Semester 1)
    This course will look at the development of documentary film, attempting to place important developments within a theoretical context. The course will begin by looking at the way in which the early pioneers of documentary film emerged in the 1920s, and seek to understand the contributions of John Grierson, Robert Flaherty and Dziga Vertov, and the relationship between their work. This will be followed by an examination of the emergence of Direct Cinema and Cinema Verité during the 1960s, and the challenges faced by those attempting to work within observational documentary. The rejection of the purely observational mode of documentary, and the rise of the participatory film-maker will follow, leading on to an examination of reflexive documentaries, the role of dramatisation within documentary film, drama-documentary and docudrama. The final part of the course will look at the influence of new technology upon documentary film, analysing the influence of both computer generated imagery and animation upon documentary film. Specific attention will be paid to the work of film-makers such as Albert and David Maysles, DA Pennebaker, Nick Broomfield, Molly Dineen, Errol Morris, and Kevin MacDonald among others.
    or
    UXC-2046: Y Ffilm ddogfen:Theori (20) (Semester 1)
    Bydd y cwrs hwn yn edrych ar ddatblygiad ffilmiau dogfen gan geisio gosod datblygiadau pwysig mewn cyd-destun damcaniaethol. Caiff hanes y ffilm ddogfen ei drafod yng nghyd-destun y cwestiynnau syniadaethol a ddilynodd o esblygiad gwahanol fathau o ffilmiau dogfen. Bydd myfyrwyr ar y cwrs yn edrych ar amrediad o ffilmiau, o'r 1920au hyd heddiw, ond bydd mwyafrif y ffilmiau a fydd yn cael eu harchwilio yn rhai cyfoes. Bydd gofyn i'r myfyrwyr ddadansoddi'r ffilmiau, gan gyfeirio at theori dogfen wedi ei ysgrifennu gan amrywiaeth o awduron, gan gynnwys: John Grierson, Dziga Vertov, Paul Rotha, Bill Nichols, Stella Bruzzi, John Corner, a Paul Wells, ymhlith eraill.
  • UXS-2062: Film Distribution & Marketing (20) (Semester 1)
  • LXF-2104: French Cinema 1895-1950 (20) (Semester 1)
    The French hold cinema in greater esteem than perhaps any other nation, both as an art form and as popular entertainment; since its inception, the septième Art has produced a wealth of talent and many films of world standing. In this course we will look - on the big screen - at prominent examples of French cinema from its first decades, from the earliest work of the Lumière brothers in the 1890s to the mid-20th Century. The course looks at the general development of French cinema in the period, concentrating on: (i) a major classic from the silent era; (ii) a film from the Poetic Realism movement of the 1930s; (iii) an artistic, non-realist film from the end of the period covered. Key texts Main films studied Luis Buñuel’s Un Chien andalou Jean Vigo’s Vigo’s Zéro de conduite Jean Renoir’s Boudu sauvé des eaux Jean Renoir’s La Grande Illusion Marcel Carné’s Hôtel du Nord Marcel Carné’s Le Jour se lève Main secondary texts Andrew, James Dudley. Mists of regret: culture and sensibility in classic French film (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1995). Armes, Roy. French Cinema (London: Secker and Warburg, 1985). Hayward, Susan. French National Cinema, (London and New York: Routledge, 2005). Hayward , Susan and Ginette Vincendeau (eds.). French Film: Texts and Contexts (London and New York: Routledge, 2002). Martin, John. The Golden Age of French Cinema, 1929-1939 (London: Columbus Books, 1983). Powrie, Phil and Keith Reader (eds.). French Cinema: A Student's Guide (London: Arnold, 2002). Williams, Alan. Republic of images: a history of French film making (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1992).

Year 3 Modules

Compulsory Modules

0 to 40 credits from:

  • UXS-3090: Dissertation (40) (Semester 1 + 2)
    This module is a period of supervised research culminating in the submission of a 10,000-word dissertation worth 40 credits. In week six students will make a 10 minute oral presentation on the progress of their research to date. Students wishing to produce a piece of practice-based audio-visual research (e.g. a fiction or non-fiction television, film or radio piece) must normally register for UXS 3091 (Final Year Group Project), although there is opportunity to employ creative methodologies so for practice-based students to utilise their learning and skills in a research context.
    or
    UXC-3090: Ast'th Unigol neu Draethawd (40) (Semester 1 + 2)
    Mae'r modiwl hwn yn datblygu ar yr hyn a astudiwyd yn y modiwl UXS 2092 yn yr ail flwyddyn. Cyfnod o ymchwil dan oruchwyliaeth fydd yn arwain at gyflwyno traethawd hir 10,000 o eiriau gwerth 40 credyd yw'r modiwl hwn. Yn wythnos 6, bydd gofyn i fyfyrwyr roi cyflwyniad llafar 10 munud ar hynt eu hymchwil hyd yma. Fel rheol, dylai myfyrwyr sydd eisiau gwneud ymchwil clyweledol yn seiliedig ar ymarfer (e.e. darn teledu, ffilm neu radio ffuglen neu ffeithiol) gofrestru ar UXS 3091 (project grŵp blwyddyn olaf) yn lle’r modiwl hwn, er bod cyfle i ddefnyddio methodolegau creadigol er mwyn i fyfyrwyr ar gyrsiau sy'n seiliedig ar ymarfer allu defnyddio eu dysgu a'u sgiliau mewn cyd-destun ymchwil. Ni ellir cymryd y modiwl hwn gyda UXS 3090. Mae'n rhaid ichi fod wedi astudio UXS 2099 NEU UXS 2092 er mwyn dilyn y modiwl hwn.
  • UXS-3092: Dissertation - Action Research (40) (Semester 1 + 2)

Optional Modules

60 credits from:

  • QXE-3012: Detective Fiction (20) (Semester 1)
    This module covers nineteenth-century works by Poe, Collins and Conan Doyle; English ‘classical’ stories of the early twentieth century (Chesterton, Christie); American ‘hard boiled’ versions (Hammett, Chandler), and modernist and postmodernist variants (Borges, Auster). The module will situate the text in some historical and cultural contexts, and focus on the relationship between form and ideology in the genre.
  • QXE-3028: Literature in the Community (20) (Semester 1)
  • QXE-3031: Welsh Writing in English (20) (Semester 2)
    ‘Modern Welsh Writing in English’ will consider a range of texts, principally written in English, emerging from modern Wales. The module explores the development of a tradition of Anglophone Welsh writing from the late nineteenth century, across the twentieth century and up to the contemporary moment. In so doing seeks to investigate the varied ways in which Welsh writers – male and female, from North and South (and beyond), rural and industrial, and across a range of genres and forms – have articulated the Welsh experience in all its diversity. The module will also introduce students to some of the current critical and theoretical approaches being adopted in the study of Welsh writing.
  • QXE-3051: 19thC British Writers in Italy (20) (Semester 2)
    This course explores the dynamic place Italy – its literature, art, landscape and culture – held for nineteenth-century British writers. Through reading a variety of texts, including poetry, novels, travel writing/guides and art criticism, we will examine the ways in which writers commented on a number of identities, at individual, national and international levels. Students will be encouraged to draw on source material from a number of disciplines, in order to understand the complex dialectical relationships between cultures, particularly the intersection between literature and various visual and plastic arts. Of central importance will be the concepts of the ‘other’ and of ‘cultural capital’, both of which will be supported by current scholarship on post-Waterloo tourism to Italy and publishing practices in the long nineteenth century. Emphasis will be placed on Romantic authors, including Byron, the Shelleys and Jameson, though may also include their Victorian counterparts such as the Brownings and George Eliot.
  • QXE-3080: Chaucer: Comedy, Calamity and (20) (Semester 2)
    This module provides an opportunity to examine a range of works by Geoffrey Chaucer, one of the most interesting and important authors of late medieval English literature. Through an analysis of the Canterbury Tales alongside The House of Fame, The Book of the Duchess, Troilus and Criseyde, and selections from the Legend of Good Women, Chaucer’s literary accomplishments will be examined with the aim of understanding his place in the English canon. During the seminars there will by opportunity to explore the wide range of themes and motifs employed in Chaucer’s works, as well as his extraordinary versatility in tackling different literary genres. Students will also engage with a diversity of theoretical and critical approaches to Chaucer’s work and modern adaptations of his texts, reflecting this medieval author’s continued appeal in the modern world. This module is an ideal companion to any of the other level three medieval literature modules.
  • QXE-3086: Shakespeare's Afterlives (20) (Semester 2)
    In order to explore the concept of literary afterlives, the weekly seminars alternate between the study of a Shakespeare play and the investigation of instances of the ‘afterlife’ of that particular play. For example, a seminar on A Midsummer Night’s Dream is followed by a seminar on Angela Carter’s novel Wise Children, a text riddled with references to the play and its adaptations as well as to the ‘Shakespeare industry’ as a whole. The module encourages students to be alert to examples of the use and abuse of Shakespeare in our own contemporary contexts, and to respond creatively as well as critically to the plays and other texts under discussion. Participation in seminars is stimulated by a variety of means, including weekly presentations by pairs of students and a final colloquium on the essay projects being researched by members of the group.
  • QXE-3088: Bob Dylan (20) (Semester 2)
    SEMINARS Material to be studied in seminars will include: Critical distinctions between modernist, mass, and popular cultures; `Folk music¿ and Dylan's early career; Rock music and Dylan's transition to electric performance; The relationship between biography and critical analysis; Dylan and religion; Dylan and literature; Textual analysis of the song lyric; Dylan and the visual arts; The transition from analogue to digital reproduction and dissemination; Bootleg culture.
  • QXP-3093: Experimental Writing (20) (Semester 1)
  • QXE-3094: Realms of Magic (20) (Semester 2)
    This module will cover the development of the romance genre from its earliest form in Marie de France’s and Chrétien de Troyes’ work through to insular productions such as Amis and Amiloun, Emaré, King of Tars, Isumbras, Sir Amadace, Bevis of Hampton, and Floris and Blancheflour. The range of texts will remain flexible, and their early modern versions will also form part of the discussion; the transformations and adaptations of these romances in medieval manuscripts and early modern prints will also be addressed. Topics as varied as spiritual instruction, courtly love, political governance, war, sexual fulfilment and magic will be investigated alongside incest, race, gender and ideology. The versatility of the genre will be explored in its development into other genres, in particular, but not exclusively, in early modern drama, and the endurance of its appeal will be judged with reference to the transformation of the genre in the early modern period. Connections will be established with Shakespeare’s plays and Spenser’s Faerie Queene. The module will end with analyses of adaptations of romance in the modern period (novel, film productions).
  • QXE-3096: Medieval Women's Literature (20) (Semester 1)
    What texts were medieval women writing and reading? This module examines women’s textual culture in an historical period in which many male-authored works encouraged women to be ‘chaste, silent and obedient,’ in spite of an assumption that women were naturally inclined towards lust and gossip. The module explores texts from the range of literature written and read by women, and the ways in which female-produced works (those written, translated, read, commissioned, performed and discussed in medieval England) were in dialogue with the constructions of medieval womanhood current during this period. The texts studied in seminar offer opportunity to hear, amongst others, the intimate thoughts and words of Margery Kempe, Julian of Norwich, the Paston wives and Marie de France, on topics as broad as love, marriage, sex, death and religion, as recorded in travel narratives, letters, devotions, lyrics and other literature – all of which contributed to the rich textual culture of the Middle Ages. This module is an ideal companion to any of the other level three medieval literature modules.
  • QXE-3099: The English Dissertation (40) (Semester 1 + 2)
    This module involves the production of an extended piece of critical writing of a length and quality appropriate to the culmination of the undergraduate degree scheme. Drawing on knowledge and critical methodologies learned earlier in the degree, students will be assisted via lectures and individual supervisions in devising, refining, developing and presenting a substantial piece of critical work on a topic of their choosing. The series of introductory lectures and workshops will focus on how to develop the initial research idea into a workable project presented in appropriate scholarly form. Critical self-reflection will be developed via the proposal and oral presentation in the first semester, and via discussions with the supervisor, which are held at key stages in the development of the project in both semesters.
  • QXE-3107: EM Lit: Sex, Sects and Scandal (20) (Semester 1)
    Beginning with English constructions of nationhood in the 1590s, this module will examine the pressures that are placed upon Tudor notions of English identity by the ways in which early modern texts engage with Britishness. From here, the module will move to explore seventeenth century Anglophone literature in Wales, Ireland and Scotland. Authors to be studied might include Edmund Spenser, Thomas Nashe, Thomas Deloney, Thomas Heywood, William Shakespeare, Katherine Philips, Henry Vaughn, William Drummond and Roger Boyle.
  • QXE-3109: Victorian Networks (20) (Semester 1)
  • Students may not take a dissertation in both English Literature and the other discipline of the Joint Honours programme.

20 to 60 credits from:

  • LXI-3011: Adaptations in European Cinema (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    During this course you will be introduced to issues relating to the re-use of tradition through the study of adaptations and/or recreations of literary texts, historical events or historical figures in Spanish and Italian cinema. You will thus become familiar with the socio-historical and ideological concerns that characterise contemporary Spain and Italy and you will reflect on the importance of film as a cultural medium. Primary sources: Films - Bernardo Bertolucci, 'Spider's Stratagem' (1969) - Vittorio De Sica, 'The Garden of the Finzi-Continis' (1970) - Francesco Rosi, 'Carmen' (1984) - Carlos Saura, 'Carmen' (1983) - Film and literary adaptions of the myth of Pygmalion - David Trueba, 'Soldados de Salamina' (2003) Primary sources: Texts ** A Dossier with all compulsory reading material (including short primary sources and required critical reading for seminars) will be made available from SMLC office in week 1. - Borges, Jorge Luis, "Theme of the Traitor and the Hero" in 'Labyrinths' (Penguin Books, 1970) [in dossier] - Bassani, Giorgio, 'The Garden of the Finzi-Continis' (Quartet Books, 1997) or Bassani, Giorgio 'Il Giardino dei Finzi-Contini' (Einaudi, 1999) - Bizet, Georges, 'Carmen', libretto by Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halévy with English [in dossier] - Mérimée, Prosper, 'Carmen' trans. by Nicholas Jotcham (Oxford: Oxford UP, 1998) [in dossier] - Quim Monzó, ‘Pigmalió’, in El perquè de toto plegat (Quaderns Crema, 1993). - Javier Cercas, 'Soldados de Salamina' (Tusqusts Editores, 2003); 'Soldiers of Salamis' (Bloomsbury, 2003)
  • UXS-3025: Stanley Kubrick: Auteur (20) (Semester 1)
    The enigmatic Stanley Kubrick was one of the most well-known filmmakers of the twentieth century. Although not prolific, his work was widely admired both by critics and mass audiences. Kubrick's films also provide a prism through which we can view the major events of the twentieth century including World War One, the Holocaust, the Cold War and the Vietnam War. In doing so, his films provide an opportunity to explore the key themes of science, technology, history, race, violence, gender, ethnicity, sexuality and war. Teaching is by means of a two-hour seminar per week. In addition, students are required to organise small-group viewing of designated films per week.
  • LXS-3041: Catalan Identity on the Screen (20) (Semester 2)
    The module will cover the following topics: 1) Theorising national cinema: key concepts; 2) Challenging the hegemonic gaze: the Barcelona School of Film; 3) Staging Identity: Adaptations of theatre and the novel 4) Re-mapping the urban landscape: the films of Ventura Pons; 5) Female Subjectivity and Authorship in Sílvia Munt’s Gala (2003); 6) Monstrous Identities: containing illness and sexual deviance in El mar by Agustí Villaronga; 7) Trauma in Elisa K by Judith Colell and Jordi Cadena; 8) The New Documentary: Memory and Reconstruction; 9) Beyond National Boundaries: Transnationalism and Multilingualism in Els nens salvatges by Patricia Ferreira ; 10) New Directions: science fiction and the horror genre; and 11) Scene-Analysis (one-hour in-class assessment) & Revision and Essay Preparation. Core films: Delete Nedar by Carla Subirana
  • UXS-3050: Race & Gender (20) (Semester 2)
    Topics to be looked at will include, Senegalese Cinema, women in photography, race and gender in performance art, representing women on film, women and genre, Women and horror, women and action, Australian Visual Culture, Aboriginal female film makers, remembering the slave trade, post-colonialism, neo-colonialism and representation, how we define `white'.
  • UXS-3062: Film Distribution & Marketing (20) (Semester 1)
  • LXF-3106: French Cinema since 1960 (20) (Semester 2)
    In chronological terms, this course follows on from module LXF2104 French Cinema 1895-1950. However, students who have not taken LXF2104 or have not previously studied cinema are more than welcome to take this module. This course will focus on French cinema from the New Wave period of the 1950s and 1960s to the new millennium. Through analysis of films by four different directors from four different decades, key cinematic trends will be identified, analysed and contextualized. Key trends / periods to be studied include 1950s/60s New Wave cinema, the "cinéma du look" of the 1980s, and the renewal of social and political cinema in France since 1995. This will expose students to key concepts in film studies and encourage critical reflection on how the range of techniques utilised by a director contribute to cinematic meaning. The films studied will be situated both in relation to cinematic and political trends contemporary to their production. Key texts Austin, Guy. 1996. Contemporary French Cinema: An Introduction . (Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press). Ezra, Elizabeth. 2004. European Cinema (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press). Hayward, Susan. 2005 (or 1993). French National Cinema, (London and New York: Routledge). This book is available on the library website as an e-book: click here. Hayward , Susan and Ginette Vincendeau (eds.). 2002. French Film: Texts and Contexts (London and New York: Routledge). Hjort, Mette and Scott Mackenzie. 2000. Cinema and Nation (London and New York: Routledge). See chs. 4-7, esp. Ch.6 on 'Framing National Cinemas' by Susan Hayward. This book is available via the library website as an e-book: click here. Kline, T. Jefferson. 2010. Unravelling French Cinema (Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell). Available as an e-book via the Bangor University website: http://www.bangor.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=485677. Powrie, Phil (ed.). 1999. French cinema in the 1990s : continuity and difference (Oxford: Oxford University Press). Powrie, Phil and Keith Reader (eds.). 2002. French Cinema: A Student's Guide (London: Arnold). See esp. pp. 3-53. This book is available on the library website as an e-book: click here. Any other learning resources The core films studied are Jean-Luc Godard's A Bout de souffle (1960), Jean-Luc Godard's Week-end (1967), Claude Chabrol's Le Boucher (1970), Luc Besson's Subway, Jacques Martineau and Olivier Ducastel's Drôle de Félix (1999) and Nicolas Philibert's Etre et avoir (2002) and Michel Haznavicius' The Artist (2011).
  • If Dissertation/Project is taken in Film Studies, choose 20 credits from Film Studies options. If Dissertation is taken in other subject, choose 60 credits from list above.