Modules for course 3QV1 | BA/ELH
BA History and English Literature

These were the modules for this course in the 2017–18 academic year.

You can also view the modules offered in the years: 2018–19; 2019–20.

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Year 1 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • QXE-1013: Reading, Thinking, Writing (20)
    The course will include analytical reading of drama, prose, poetry and film in English from the medieval period to the present era; an introduction to critical and theoretical approaches to the reading of literature; integration of close textual study and critical/theoretical approaches, as the foundation for all other modules in the School; practical development of skills of literary commentary, essay writing, and critical discussion.
  • HCH-1050: The Past Unwrapped (20)
    1. Introduction: From Past to Present: Some ideas on how to make the best of your existing skills as you move to university-level study. Learn some of the basics of studying History and/or Archaeology at Bangor. 2. Library skills and making intelligent use of the web: Looking at what to expect in the university library, how to use reading lists, how much to read and what to do with all those electronic resources at your disposal. 3. From chaos to order: organisation and note-taking. How to plan and organise your work, and how to make wise decisions when taking notes from books, articles and lectures. 4. Avoiding plagiarism: Learn why cutting and pasting from the web is bad practice, and why academic misconduct is treated very seriously. Learn as well how to avoid this by referencing effectively i.e. using evidence, footnotes and compiling solid bibliographies. 5. Essays and making a good (grammatical) impression: Understand what the essay question actually wants you to do, how to structure your work, and how to develop an argument. Gain insight into some of the common errors in History and Archaeology essays, and see why good spelling and punctuation are crucial. 6. Historiography: How to make sense of all these academics saying different things and disagreeing with each other. What are the differences (and similarities) between ‘academic’ and ‘popular’ history? 7. Analysis and critical thinking: Or, how to move beyond just describing the past. Understand what your tutor means by telling you to be more critical. 8. Make your voice heard: competent communication: Understand why it’s important for you to communicate your ideas clearly, and how you can prepare effectively for presentations. 9. Documents and sources: Learn how historians use different types of documents and artefacts, and explore how you can analyse them yourself. 10. Far-reaching feedback: What is the purpose of feedback, and how are different types of assignments marked? Learn that you need to look beyond your mark to improve your work. 11. Exam technique: How to keep it together in exams, and how to deduce what exam questions actually want you to do.
    or
    HCC-1050: Dechrau o'r Dechrau (20)
    1. Rhagarweiniad: O'r Gorffennol i'r Presennol: Rhai syniadau ar sut i wneud y defnydd gorau o'ch sgiliau presennol wrth i chi symud ymlaen i astudio ar lefel prifysgol. Dysgu rhai o egwyddorion sylfaenol astudio Hanes ac/neu Archaeoleg ym Mangor. 2. Sgiliau llyfrgell a defnyddio'r we yn ddeallus: Edrych ar yr hyn y dylech ei ddisgwyl yn llyfrgell y brifysgol, sut i ddefnyddio rhestrau darllen, faint i'w ddarllen a beth i'w wneud gyda'r holl adnoddau electroneg hynny sydd ar gael i chi. 3. O anrhefn i drefn: rhoi trefn ar bethau a chymryd nodiadau. Sut i gynllunio a threfnu eich gwaith, a sut i wneud penderfyniadau doeth wrth gymryd nodiadau o lyfrau, erthyglau a darlithoedd. 4. Osgoi llên-ladrad: Dysgu sut mae torri a phastio deunydd o'r we yn ffordd wael iawn o weithio a pham mae camymddwyn academaidd yn cael ei drin fel mater difrifol iawn. Dysgu'n ogystal sut i osgoi hyn drwy gyfeirnodi effeithiol, h.y. defnyddio tystiolaeth, troednodiadau a llunio llyfryddiaethau cadarn. 5. Traethodau a gwneud argraff (ramadegol) dda: Deall beth yn union mae cwestiwn y traethawd eisiau i chi ei wneud, sut i drefnu eich gwaith a sut i ddatblygu dadl. Cael golwg ar rai camgymeriadau cyffredin mewn traethodau Hanes ac Archaeoleg a gweld pam fod sillafu da ac atalnodi yn allweddol. 6. Hanesyddiaeth: Sut i wneud synnwyr o'r holl academyddion hyn yn dweud pethau gwahanol ac anghytuno â'i gilydd. Beth yw'r gwahaniaethau (a'r tebygrwydd) rhwng hanes 'academaidd' a 'phoblogaidd'? 7. Dadansoddi a meddwl yn feirniadol: Neu, sut i fynd ymhellach na dim ond disgrifio'r gorffennol. Deall beth mae eich tiwtor yn ei olygu pan fydd yn dweud wrthych am fod yn fwy beirniadol. 8. Cyfle i ddweud eich dweud: cyfathrebu medrus: Deall pam mae'n bwysig i chi gyfathrebu eich syniadau'n glir, a sut y gellwch baratoi'n effeithiol at gyflwyniadau. 9. Dogfennau a ffynonellau: Dysgu sut mae haneswyr yn defnyddio gwahanol fathau o ddogfennau ac arteffactau ac edrych sut y gellwch eu dadansoddi eich hun. 10. Adborth (sylwadau) pellgyrhaeddol: Beth yw diben adborth (sylwadau ar eich gwaith), a sut y caiff mathau gwahanol o aseiniadau eu marcio? Dysgu bod angen i chi edrych y tu hwnt i'ch marc i wella eich gwaith. 11. Sut i weithredu mewn arholiadau: Sut i beidio â chynhyrfu a gwneud yn dda mewn arholiadau, a gweld beth yn union mae cwestiynau arholiad yn gofyn i chi ei wneud.

Optional Modules

40 credits from:

  • QXE-1003: Intro. to Medieval Literature (20) (Semester 2)
    Introduction to Medieval Literature offers students the opportunity to study a variety of Old English literature that is evocative of the intricate decoration on the Staffordshire Anglo-Saxon hoard; riddles, Old English battle poetry and The Dream of The Rood (taught in translation). In the second part of the module students will encounter Middle English drama, romance poetry and Chaucerian verse in its original language. The transition between the Old to the Middle English period will be analysed in terms of specific themes and motifs, such as the development from pagan Germanic heroism to Christian values. Chivalry, the comic and bawdy, and piety will be the main foci in the Middle English part of the course, explored through a range of poetry, prose, drama and life writing. This module is an ideal ‘taster’ for the medieval literature modules available at levels two and three.
  • QXE-1004: The Literature of Laughter (20) (Semester 1)
    The module is organised on a chronological basis, moving from Chaucer to Monty Python and beyond, taking in on the way a selection of texts by Shakespeare, Wycherley, Pope, Swift, Austen, Dickens, Twain, as well as Kate Atkinson’s Behind the Scenes at the Museum and an anthology of comic verse. The lectures place the texts in their historical and cultural contexts, while the seminars and study groups focus on the week’s specified text for close reading and discussion. Both the lectures and the smaller groups are consistently concerned with the module’s over-riding questions about the nature of literary laughter. Concepts such as wit and satire are analysed, along with some of the recurring topics of humorous writing: religion, politics, sex and gender. The major functions of laughter – for stereotyping, for self-defence, for reform, rebellion, or release of tension – are highlighted for both their continuity and their difference in specific literary and cultural contexts.
  • QXE-1014: The Gothic in Literature/Film (20) (Semester 2)
    This introductory course focuses mainly on Gothic writing from the late eighteenth century onwards, although it begins by looking at examples of the medieval and early-modern grotesque that help to set early Gothic novels in context. Organized in a loosely chronological way, this module is particularly sensitive to the ways in which Gothic texts have been used to represent contemporary cultural anxieties (such as the New Woman in the last quarter of the nineteenth century, or New Technology in the early years of the twenty-first), but it will also examine how the Gothic has been used to articulate political resistance, for example in anti-imperialist, post-colonial, and feminist works. It will also pay particular attention to the Gothic as a visual form, both analysing the representation of Gothic spaces in eighteenth and nineteenth-century literature and art, and investigating the importance of the genre to the development of cinema, from silent-era German expressionism to the present. While the precise topics covered by the module will vary from year to year, themes will include some of the following: Terror and the Sublime; Monstrosity and Deviance; Doubles and Doppelgängers; Vampires and Sexualities; Parody and Pastiche; Domesticity and ‘The Uncanny’; Cybergothic and the Post-human; Feminist and Postcolonial Rewritings; Gothic and the Young Adult Novel. Students will situate texts within their historical and political contexts, and will also gain an awareness of a range of important theories (from Freud’s notion of the Uncanny to Derrida’s theories of hauntology) that will be important to the study of literature in the rest of their degree.
  • QXE-1015: Landmarks in Literature (20) (Semester 2)
    The specific texts studied will vary from year to year, but the module will include nineteenth-century works (e.g. Edgar Allan Poe, Arthur Conan Doyle); English ‘classical’ stories of the early twentieth century (e.g. Agatha Christie); American ‘hard boiled’ versions (e.g. Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler), and modernist, postmodernist and other variants (e.g. Jorge Luis Borges, Sara Paretsky, Walter Mosley, Paul Auster). Film and television adaptations may also be included. The module will also situate the texts in relevant historical and cultural contexts, and explore them via key concepts in literary theory.
  • QXE-1016: Children's Fiction (20) (Semester 1)

40 credits from:

  • HXH-1002: Birth of Modern Europe (20) (Semester 2)
    The Renaissance; state formation; multiple monarchies (Valois France, the Habsburg Dominions, centre and peripheries in Britain and Ireland); the Reformation in Britain and on the Continent.
    or
    HXC-1003: Genedigaeth yr Ewrop Fodern (20) (Semester 2)
  • HXH-1004: Intro Modern History1815-1914 (20) (Semester 1)
    This module provides an introduction to nineteenth-century history, in particular: - Key events and dates - The political geography of Europe - Industrial Revolutions - Workers - Workers’ Political Movements - Middle Classes - Liberalism and Conservatism - Elites - Revolutions - Nationalism and Nation States - The Disintegration of Multinational Empires - War and Diplomacy - Imperialism It also provides an introduction to basic study skills, in particular: - The Library - Planning, Literature Search, Bibliography - Essay Writing - References, Footnotes, Plagiarism
    or
    HXC-1004: Cyflwyniad Hanes Modern (20) (Semester 1)
    Bydd y modiwl hwn yn rhoi arweiniad i hanes y bedwaredd ganrif ar bymtheg, yn arbennig: - y chwyldro amaethyddol a’r chwyldro diwydiannol - yr elit a’r dosbarth canol - Rhyddfrydiaeth a Cheidwadaeth - gweithwyr a'r werin - mudiadau gwleidyddol gweithwyr - chwyldroadau - cenedlaetholdeb a hunaniaeth genedlaethol - rhyfel a diplomyddiaeth - Imperialaeth
  • HXW-1007: Wales: Princes to Tudors (20) (Semester 1)
    Wales in the age of Owain Gwynedd and Lord Rhys; Gerald of Wales; rise of Llywelyn ap Iorwerth in Gwynedd and over much of the rest of Wales; the reign of Dafydd ap Llywelyn and succession to Gwynedd; the hegemony and downfall of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, prince of Wales; poetry and history writing in medieval Wales; Welsh political aspirations in l4th century; Owain Glyndŵr and his movement; Brutus, 1485 and political prophecy; Wales and the Reformation; Wales and the Renaissance; Wales and 16th-century politics – the Acts of Union.
    or
    HXC-1007: Cymru: Tywysogion i Duduriaid (20) (Semester 1)
    Oes Owain Gwynedd a'r Arglwydd Rhys; Gerallt Gymro; Llywelyn ap Iorwerth (m. 1240) a'i feibion; Penarglwyddiaeth a chwymp Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, Tywysog Cymru (m. 1282); barddoniaeth a hanes yn yr Oesoedd Canol; dyheadau gwleidyddol Cymreig yn y bedwaredd ganrif ar ddeg; mudiad Glyndwr; Brutus, 1485 a'r traddodiad proffwydol; Cymru a'r Diwygiad Protestannaidd; Cymru a'r Dadeni; Cymru a gwleidyddiaeth yr unfed ganrif ar bymtheg - y Deddfau Uno.
  • HXH-1009: War, Society and the Media (20) (Semester 2) or
    HXC-1009: Rhyfel, Cymdeithas, Cyfryngau (20) (Semester 2)
  • HXW-1010: Wales since 1789 (20) (Semester 2) or
    HXC-1006: Cymru yn y Byd Modern (20) (Semester 2)
    Wythnos 1: Darlith: Deall Cymru fodern ac amcanion y modiwl Dim seminar Wythnos 2: Darlith: Meithrin Cymru fodern (i): Diwydiant ac economi Seminar: Siartiaeth a Beca Wythnos 3: Darlith: Meithrin Cymru fodern (ii): Trosedd, cosb a moesoldeb Seminar: Y Gymru fywgraffiadol: David Lloyd George fel astudiaeth achos Wythnos 4: Darlith: Themâu (i): Mewnfudo ac allfudo Seminar: Mewnfudo Wythnos 5: Darlith: Themâu (ii): Iaith, addysg a chrefydd yn y 19eg ganrif Seminar: Cenedlaetholdeb, Tynged yr Iaith Wythnos 6: Darlith: Themâu (iii): Effaith y ddau ryfel byd Seminar: Y Gymru Lafurol Gweithdy: Eidalwyr yng Nghymru Wythnos 7: WYTHNOS DDARLLEN Wythnos 8: Darlith: Themâu (iv): Merched a llunio Cymru fodern Seminar: Cerddoriaeth boblogaidd Wythnos 9: Darlith: Themâu (v): Diwylliant poblogaidd a newid cymdeithasol Seminar: Merched mewn llenyddiaeth Gymreig Wythnos 10: Darlith: Themâu (vi): Chwaraeon a hunaniaeth Seminar: Hunaniaeth Wythnos 11: Darlith: Materion (i): Y frwydr am hunan-reolaeth Seminar: Y Cwestiwn Cenedlaethol Wythnos 12: Darlith: Materion (ii): Creu Cymru newydd? Seminar: Sesiwn adolygu
  • HXH-1011: Europe in the High Middle Ages (20) (Semester 1) or
    HXC-1011: Ewrop yn y Canol Oesoedd Uchel (20) (Semester 1)
  • Students are encouraged to select modules that cover more than one of the generally recognised periods of History (Medieval, Early Modern and Modern).

Year 2 Modules

Optional Modules

60 credits from:

  • QXE-2003: Jonson to Johnson (20) (Semester 2)
  • QXE-2005: Victorian Literature (20) (Semester 2)
    The Victorians lived in an era of change and contradictions: a culture in which some reaped immense rewards from mechanised industry, but feared the idea of 'mechanism'; a period which saw the growth of cities and democracy, but was attracted to images of medieval feudalism. These themes will be examined, along with: realism in the Victorian novel; the narrators of the Victorian novel; ideas of truth in art and fiction; the figure of the intellectual or 'sage'; the domestic sphere; children and orphans; women as writers and members of Victorian society; the important relationship between notions of scientific 'truth' and religious 'faith', and ideas of nationality and race as expressed in the work of Irish, Scottish and Welsh authors working within concepts associated with the British empire. This course looks at a broad range of texts including novels, poetry and essays. Authors studied may include Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Gaskell, Charlotte Bronte, John Ruskin, Robert Browning, Alfred Tennyson, Christina Rossetti, Robert Stevenson, Bram Stoker and Oscar Wilde.
  • QXE-2013: Renaissance and Reformation (20) (Semester 1)
    This course offers an introduction to the `Golden Age¿ of English literature, an exciting period of cultural change which encompasses the Reformation, the rise of a culture of individualism, and the English Revolution of the 1640s and 1650s. Among the modes of writing produced in these turbulent circumstances are poetic forms such as songs, sonnets, epigrams and pastoral epic; dramatic genres such as revenge tragedy and city comedy; and prose works such as autobiographical confessions, pamphlets and fiery sermons. Texts week 1. William Shakespeare, Henry V 2. Philip Sidney, Apology for poetry and all sonnets in Norton from Astrophil and Stella 3. Christopher Marlowe, The Jew of Malta 4. Edmund Spenser, book 1 of The Faerie Queene (in Norton) 5. William Shakespeare, Othello 6. John Webster, The Duchess of Malfi (in Norton) 7. reading week 8. John Donne, Songs and Sonnets, the Elegies,and the Holy Sonnets (all those in the Norton) 9. George Herbert and Henry Vaughan (all poems in the Norton) 10. John Milton, Paradise Lost (books 1-4, in Norton) 11. John Dryden, The Conquest of Granada 12. Etheridge, The Man of Mode Editions ¿ no preference.
  • QXE-2019: Contemporary Writing (Lit) (20) (Semester 2)
    ‘Contemporary Literatures’ introduces students to the first postmodern texts in the 1950s, and takes them right up to literature from the present day. The course asks students to investigate how literature (across a range of genres) responds to the broad historical trends and specific events of the age. While these might include residual literary traditions from the 1950s such as the theatre of ‘angry young men’ and ‘Movement’ poetry, the module will initially focus on the emergence of postmodernity. It will go on to consider how the Anglophone literary field has became more international in the second half of the twentieth century, witnessing the emergence of national literary traditions in a range of former colonies. New and contemporary movements and traditions in Anglophone literature will be explored in the second part of the course. These might include British Asian literature, post 9/11 literature, recent American drama, eco-poetry and the effect on literature of recent digital innovation.
  • QXE-2020: The Romantic Period in Britain (20) (Semester 1)
    The Romantic Period (c. 1785 -1832) was marked by social change, political strife and a growth in print culture. In many ways it was the start of the modern age, as Britain sought to define itself both internally and within a global context. This course introduces students to both canonical and non-canonical texts of the period and the ways in which they both shaped and reflected wider social and cultural concerns. It will guide students through key areas of current scholarship of the period so that they may refine their understanding of the relationship between texts and their contexts. In order to question what the term ‘Romanticism’ may entail, this course focuses not only on certain authors and texts from this period but also what may be termed Romantic spaces, including the home, nation, metropolis (both London and Edinburgh will feature prominently), border spaces, natural or picturesque settings (including Tintern Abbey and nearby Snowdon), reading rooms, theatres, the boxing ring and galleries.
  • QXE-2024: Alfred Hitchcock (20) (Semester 2)
    Alfred Hitchcock is perhaps the most notable example of a director whose films were popular both with audiences and with critics seeking to establish the credibility of film as an art form. His work provides a case-study of theories of authorship; of different national cinemas and studio systems, and of a particular genre, the thriller. In addition, the popularity and accessibility of Hitchcock’s films also raise questions concerning narrative, spectatorial pleasure, the gaze, and gender, and consequently provide an opportunity to explore the interrelation and limits of film theory and film practice
  • QXE-2027: Literature and Modernity (20) (Semester 1)
    Literature and Modernity examines literature about, or by writers from, Britain and Ireland in a period bracketed by the emergence of proto-modernist writing in the late 1890s and the emergence in the early 1950s of texts that would later be seen as postmodern. This period in Western Europe witnessed unprecedented changes in the modes of production, in relations between the sexes and between the classes, and in the development of new cultural forms like radio and cinema. While these originated in the Victorian period, they were accelerated by the social and psychological impact of the First World War, global depression, the rise of fascism, another catastrophic World War and the start of the nuclear age, historical factors that make the study of literature from this period especially rewarding. Students will study some of the ways in which authors responded to these cataclysmic shifts by considering work from a range of critical perspectives. These may include the literary movement (for example, modernism), broad historical change (for example, changes in gender roles), a major historical event (for example, the Second World War), genre, or recent trends in criticism which encourage us to look at this period’s writing from a new angle.
  • QXE-2101: Beowulf to Malory (20) (Semester 1)
    Seminar list/lecture list Week 1 Historical and Cultural Overview of the Old English Period Week 2 Beowulf Week 3 The Old English Elegies Week 4 Christian Heroes Week 5 Chaucer: Canterbury Tales: General Prologue and the Franklin's Prologue and Tale Week 6 Chaucer: the Nun's Priest's Prologue and Tale Week 7: NO LECTURES OR SEMINAR Week 8 Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Week 9 Malory, The Morte Darthur, I Week 10 Malory, The Morte Darthur, II Week 11 Henryson (photocopies to be provided) Week 12 NO LECTURES; revision seminar
  • Students must take (at least) 1 module dealing with Literature before 1800, and 1 from post-1800 modules.

60 credits from:

  • HGW-2003: Re-igniting the Dragon (20) (Semester 1)
  • HCH-2050: Debating History (20) (Semester 1)
    The first part of the course is concerned with the use of the past made by historians and commentators such as politicians, the way traditions are invented (and destroyed), and introduces the different historiographical schools. The second part covers some historiographical (ie. concerned with the art of writing history) issues with emphasis on the various ideas about the study and writing of history which have developed over the last two centuries and which students need to understand in order to engage confidently with the different approaches which professional historians take to their work. This is taught through a case-study approach where students can apply the different approaches studied in the first part of the course to specific controversial historical subjects. The course will cover the following topics: Whig and Tory history, Ranke, the professionalisation of the study of history, nations, empire, structuralism, post-structuralism, revisionism, counter-factual history, case studies may change from year to year but will include topics such as The Peasants’ Revolt, The English civil war, the outbreak of world war one; suffrage, consumerism, the Welsh in history, the Reformation. American Civil war, Cold War; Oral history; National identity.
    or
    HCG-2011: Dehongli'r Gorffennol (20) (Semester 1)
    Er y byddir yn rhoi peth sylw i rai o haneswyr mawr y bedwaredd ganrif ar bymtheg – fel Ranke, Macaulay a Marx – bydd pwyslais y cwrs ar hanesyddiaeth yr ugeinfed ganrif. Canolbwyntir gan hynny ar feddylwyr a thueddiadau allweddol ym maes hanesyddiaeth yn ystod y ganrif ddiwethaf gan astudio enghreifftiau penodol o gynnyrch y meddylwyr a’r ysgolion dan sylw. Ymysg y pynciau a astudir bydd Ysgol yr Annales, Hanesyddiaeth Farcsaidd, Hanes Merched, Hanes Llafar, a her syniadaeth ôl-strwythurol ac ôl-fodern. Neulltuir yn ogystal ddwy ddarlith i drafod agweddau ar Hanesyddiaeth Cymru yn y cyfnod diweddar.
  • HWH-2070: History Workplace Module S1 (20) (Semester 1)
    The student normally spends one day a week during the appropriate semester, and in total about 70 hours, working in an archives office, an archaeological unit or a museum service undertaking specific tasks of a practical as well as an academic nature as given them by the officer(s) in charge. These typically include drawing up inventories, collating field evidence, drawing up catalogues of discrete manuscript or artefact collections, as well as at times dealing with public enquiries. Currently the Department has agreements with most of the archive record offices in north Wales, but especially at Caernarfon and Llangefni, with the Gwynedd Archaeological Trust, with Oriel Bangor and Oriel Môn at Llangefni and the regimental Museum at Caernarfon. Approved excavation training courses may qualify if of sufficient duration and rigour and conform to the Course Guidelines. Students should also be aware that there are health and safety implications to all placements.
  • HWH-2071: History Workplace Module S2 (20) (Semester 2)
  • HTA-2111: Ancestral Landscapes (20) (Semester 1)
    1. Introduction and the chronology of later prehistoric Britain and Ireland 2. Mesolithic background and the nature of hunter-gatherers 3. The Mesolithic/Neolithic transition 4. The environment, forest clearances and the role of cereals and meat in Neolithic diets 5. Settlements, houses and mobility 6. Neolithic material culture: pottery, stone tools, axes and flint mines 7: Places for the ancestors: the role of the dead in Neolithic society 8. Monuments 1: chambered tombs 9. Monuments 2: causewayed enclosures 10. Monuments 3: cursus, henges and stone circles 11. Theory 1: Prehistoric landscapes, phenomenology and experience 12. Theory 2: The natural world: natural places and human-animal relations 13. Ireland: a case study 14. Early Bronze Age: Introduction 15. Places for the dead: Earlier Bronze Age burial and ceremony 16. Early Bronze Age: elements of continuity, elements of change 17. Early Bronze Age/Middle Bronze Age transition 18: Dividing the land: Later Bronze Age Settlement 19. Later Bronze Age burial and ceremony 20. The production and consumption of prestige goods 21. Regional archaeologies? 22. Revision session
  • HGH-2112: Civil War: Eng & Wal 1558-1660 (20) (Semester 1)
    The course concentrates upon political and religious history - but social, cultural, economic and intellectual aspects are also considered where they are relevant to the core of the course. Major topics explored include: The ‘crisis’ of the 1590s; The impact of the arrival of the Stuart dynasty; Divisions in English Protestantism; Charles I’s Personal Rule, and the outbreak of civil war; The course of the conflict, and attempts at a settlement; The reasons for the regicide; The English Republic and the restoration, 1649-1660
  • HTH-2112: Reformation & Counter-Reforma. (20) (Semester 2)
    The nature of the late medieval region; Luther's teaching; the early spread of the Reformation in town; the Peasants war; radical reformation and protestant divisions; the reformation in kingdoms and principalities; Calvinism and its association with revolt; the origins and nature of the counter-reformation; comparison of sixteenth century protestantism and catholicism.
  • HTA-2114: Experimental Archaeology (20) (Semester 2)
    1. Introduction: experimental archaeology today and its links with ethnoarchaeology 2. The history of experimental archaeology 3. Experiment by design: designing experiments, recording data and methodology 4. Prehistoric metallurgical practices: copper and bronze production 5. Stone and flint technologies; production and use-wear analysis 6. Prehistoric metallurgical practices: iron production 7. Food production: cooking with stone and food storage pits 8. Making prehistoric roundhouses 9. Cremation pyres: a case study on Early Bronze Age practices 10. Taphonomies: understanding the formation of the archaeological record through experimental archaeology 11. Experiencing experiments and materials; revision lecture
  • HTA-2117: Roman Frontier Society (20) (Semester 2)
    One of the key themes of this module is the interaction between the Roman army and native populations, and the subsequent evolution of distinct frontier societies. Contextualisation will be central to the investigation of the archaeology. Examination of material evidence from military and civilian sites will include settlement, burial and environmental evidence. Iconographic and epigraphic evidence will also be examined, as will contemporary written sources (e.g. the Vindolanda letters). Key issues explored will centre on continuity and change, and topics will include syncretism and native resistance. The history of Roman scholarship and its influence on perceptions of frontier life forms an important aspect of this course, with particular emphasis given to current post-colonial approaches.
  • HTA-2118: Field Archaeology in Britain (20) (Semester 1)
    Lectures 1. Course introduction: outline of course aims, content, assessment. 2. Research designs and regional sampling. 3. Desk-based research: (using HERs, literature searches (including grey literature), accessing aerial photographs, historical documents, place name research, map regression analysis). 4. Surveying upstanding monuments: building recording; setting up a site grid (EDM and tapes); surveying earthworks; fieldwalking strategies. 5. Geophysical surveys: magnetometer, resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, GPR 6. Setting up an archaeological excavation: SMCs, landowner permissions, logistics, sampling strategy, schedule. 7. Doing an excavation: excavation techniques: dryland, wetland, contexts 8. Doing an excavation: recording techniques (planning, section drawing, small finds) 9. Doing an excavation: sampling strategies (soil samples, dating samples) 10. Excavating human remains 11. Planning post-excavation analyses and presenting sites to the public: the importance of outreach Workshops 1. Interpreting aerial photography and geophysical surveys: formation processes, site and landscape stratigraphy, plotting data 2. Making maps (downloading data from Edina, Illustration, plotting data) 3. Designing an excavation strategy for three different case-study sites 4. Environmental soil sampling; sorting of soil residues (course residues) and presentation and analysis of data 5. Interpreting archaeological field illustrations (e.g. sections and plans); site formation processes and stratigraphy; writing stratigraphic reports Fieldtrips 1. Using the HER and grey literature searches: Gwynedd Archaeological Trust (2 hours) 1. Setting up a site grid and surveying upstanding remains (5 hours) 2. Building recording (3 hours)
  • HGH-2119: Britain 1945-1990 (20) (Semester 2)
    Britain at the outbreak of war; Dawn of a new Jerusalem; The Attlee governments, 1945-51; The affluent society ? The Wilson governments; Heath to Thatcher The decline of socialism Social attitudes and class; Youth culture Thatcherism to the Third Way; New Labour The break-up of Britain ?.
  • HTA-2120: Rethinking Archaeology (20) (Semester 2)
    Lectures 1. The origins of archaeological theory 2. The ‘New Archaeology’ and post processualism 3. Marxist and structuralist approaches in archaeology 4. The post-processualist critique 5. Multi disciplinary approaches to the archaeological record 6. The archaeology of people and social relations 7. Towards an archaeology of gender 8. Approaches to the study and interpretation of material culture 9. Contemporary approaches to archaeological landscapes 10. Understanding the built environment 11. The archaeology of ritual and religion 12. Archaeology in theory and in practice Seminars 1. The identification of cultural groups from archaeological evidence 2. The loss of innocence and the development of the ‘New Archaeology’ 3. Symbolic and structural archaeology 4. Re-constructing an interpretive archaeology 5. Social evolution and cognitive archaeology 6. How were past societies organised? 7. Representing gender in the archaeological past 8. Art or artefact: key debates in material culture studies 9. Experiencing the past: a phenomenology of landscape 10. House form and culture 11. What is ritual and religion and can we identify them in the archaeological record? 12. Critical approaches to archaeological fieldwork
  • HTA-2123: Archaeology Field School (20) (Semester 1)
    Practical skills: Archaeological excavation and survey: removing turf and topsoil cover, cleaning surfaces, sectioning and excavating features, recovering finds, soil and paleoenvironmental sampling, drawing of plans and sections, 2D and 3D photography, surveying with a total station and GPS Rover, producing written records. Archaeological post-excavation work: finds processing and recording, wet sieving soil samples, plan digitization, finds drawing and photography, report writing. Theoretical knowledge: Principles of archaeological stratigraphy, GIS and CAD applications in archaeology, UK archaeological heritage legislation; organising and financing an excavation
  • HTH-2124: Heritage and Identity (20) (Semester 1)
    Individual, group, local, regional, national and global identities; museums; political and cultural role of archaeology and history, the heritage in minority groups, the heritage of elites, oral culture, heritage and the nation state, the creation of heritage-based identities in past societies.
  • HGH-2127: Europe, Early Middle Ages (20) (Semester 2)
    1. The fall of the western Roman empire; 2. The foundation of the `barbarian¿ kingdoms; 3. Merovingians and Carolingians; 4. Charlemagne; 5. The papacy and monasticism; 6. Justinian and the Byzantine revival; 7. Culture and society; 8. Towns and economy; 9. The Vikings and the foundation of Normandy; 10. The birth of Islam and the creation of the caliphate of Cordoba. Students taking the course will study these topics using both primary sources (such as Gregory of Tours, Paul the Deacon, Einhard¿s Life of Charlemagne) and the modern historiography.
  • HTW-2127: Wales, Renaissance & Europe (20) (Semester 2)
  • HTC-2132: Rhyfel Mawr trwy lygaid y Cym. (20) (Semester 2)
    (Wythnos 1) Cyflwyniad Darlith 1 - Adrodd hanes y Rhyfel Sut mae’r ddealltwriaeth o’r Rhyfel Mawr wedi newid dros y degawdau Seminar 1 - Trafodaeth o sut mae’r myfyrwyr yn edrych ar y Rhyfel, a’r delweddau sydd yn gyfarwydd i’r Cymry; gwylio rhaglen Y Rhwyg (1988), a gyflwynwyd gan Dr John Davies (Wythnos 2) 1880-1914 Darlith 2 - Sôn am ryfel; poeni am ryfel; paratoi at ryfel; ysu am ryfel? Darlith 3 - Gorffennaf i Awst 1914 (Wythnos 3) Gwleidyddiaeth: Lloyd George, y Rhyddfrydwyr a’r Sosialwyr Darlith 4 - Cymeriad Lloyd George; Cyfraniad Lloyd George; Chwedl Lloyd George; Atgofion Lloyd George Darlith 5 - Sosialwyr a’r Rhyfel Seminar 2 – Gwleidyddiaeth a’r Rhyfel. Sut wnaeth gwleidyddion bortreadu’r Rhyfel, yn ystod yr ymladd ac yn y degawdau canlynol. (Wythnos 4) Her i’r hen syniadau am wareiddiad Darlith 6 - Gwrthwynebwyr Cydwybodol; Merched Cymru a’r Rhyfel Seminar 3 - Ymladd a gwrthod ymladd: agweddau Gwrthwynebwyr Cydwybodol, ac agweddau cymdeithas tuag at wrthwynebwyr cydwybodol (Wythnos 5) Ennill y Rhyfel; colli’r heddwch Darlith 7 – Buddugoliaeth Lloyd George? Cytundeb Versailles Darlith 8 – Dirwasgiad a Dadrithiad: y 1920au; Gwersi 1914 a’r ymgais i gymodi â Hitler: y 1930au (Wythnos 6) Yn sgil y Dadrithio Darlith 9 – Ymateb llenyddol yn y degawdau ar ôl 1918: chwedl Hedd Wyn; All Quiet on the Western Front Seminar 4 - David Davies a’r mudiad heddwch; Dyhuddiaeth a gwrthwynebiad i’r Ail Ryfel Byd (Wythnos 7) Y Llewod a’r Asynnod Darlith 10: Trafodaeth y 1960au: ‘Lions led by Donkeys’; pwysleisio ffolineb a gwastraff y rhyfel Seminar 5 – Gwylio darnau o gyfres The Great War (BBC, 1964) (Wythnos 8) Conundrum ‘y ddau Ffrynt Gorllewinol’ Darlith 11: Y gwahaniaeth rhwng maes y gad a fodolodd yn Ffrainc a Fflandrys rhwng 1914 a 1918 a’r un dychmygol sy’n gread y cenedlaethau a edrychai nôl mewn syndod a braw Seminar 6 – Cofeb Mametz; gwylio rhaglen Mametz (S4C, 1987) (Wythnos 9) Atgofion hen wŷr Darlith 12 - Trafferthion gydag atgofion cyn-filwyr, er gwaethaf eu hatyniad amlwg Darlith 13 – atgofion Griffith Williams, Bob Owen ac Ithel Davies (Wythnos 10) Hanes Diwylliannol y Rhyfel Darlith 14 - Rhoi’r cyfan mewn i gyd-destun diwylliannol Seminar 7 – Portreadu’r Rhyfel Mawr yn y Gymraeg heddiw: Lleisiau’r Rhyfel Mawr (2008) + Sesiwn ar gyfer cyflwyniadau’r myfyrwyr
  • HTH-2139: Norman Sicily (20) (Semester 1)
    1. Introduction - the creation of the kingdom, 1000-1130; 2. Roger II: the establishment of a new monarchy, 1130-1154; 3. Court culture and race relations; 4. Roger II's assizes: law and kingship; 5. Government in Sicily under the kings; 6. Reign of William I `the Bad', 1154-1166; 7. Reign of William II `the Good', 1166-1189; 8. The mosaics of the Norman kingdom¿Cefalu, Palermo and Monreale; 9. The church and the kings; 10. The chroniclers: Alexander of Telese and Hugh Falcandus. Students taking the course will study these topics using both primary sources (including the art produced in the kingdom) and the modern historiography.
  • HTH-2149: Britannia Rule the Waves (20) (Semester 2)
    (1) Introduction to the module, British Empire and Imperial Studies (2) Governing the Empire (3) British Policy and Trade (4) Technological Change (5) Scientific Exploration (6) The Empire: Asia (7) The Empire: America (8) The Empire: Africa (9) The Empire: Australasia (10) The British Empire and the Approach of War (11) Concluding lecture
  • HTH-2150: Britain in the Jazz Age (20) (Semester 2)
    1. War, Empire and Modernisation: The Boer War, WWI and an overview of the period. 2. Royalty and national identity: the Edwardian era; 1911 Investiture of the Prince of Wales; the Abdication Crisis. 3. Technological modernisation: Electricity, the wireless and motors. Case study of the Wembley Exhibition 4. Britain on the Breadline: health, living conditions and depression 5. Whippets, fish & chips and gambling: Workers, socialism and leisure 6. Nationalism and identity: Wales, Ireland and Scotland. 7. Ideology and the prelude to 1939 in Britain. A case study of Oswald Mosley and the British Union of Fascists. 8. Women in Love: Gender roles and fashion. A case study of the Mitford sisters 9. Bright Young People: Sexuality, aristocracy and decadence 10. Popular music: music halls, Jazz and Americanisation. 11. From bodyline bowling to mountaineering: Sport and society 1900-1939. 12. Workshop: Film and Jazz Age Britain 13. 1 day field trip to Manchester: Museum of Science and Industry and the People’s History Museum (including access to the Labour Party Archive)
  • HTC-2151: Gwladgarwyr a Gwladychwyr (20) (Semester 2)
    1. Cyflwyniad: trefedigaethau America yn yr Ymerodraeth Brydeinig 2. Radicaliaeth: Gweriniaethwyr a Cymedrolion 3. Cwrs y Rhyfel 4. Boston, Efrog Newydd a Virginia 5. Dynion Mawr: Washington, Jefferson 6. Y rhyfel mewn cyd-destun ehangach: Ffrainc a Phrydain 7. Creu gwladwriaeth: Datganiad Annibyniaeth; y Cyfansoddiad; Mesur Iawnderau 8. O’r tu allan: Americanwyr Cynhenid, Teyrngarwyr, Pobl Du a Menwod 9. Y Weriniaeth Gynnar 10. Effeithiau’r ‘Chwyldro’ a barnau cyfoes
  • HTC-2156: Rhyfel Cartref America (20) (Semester 1)
    Y Gogledd a’r De Gwleidyddiaeth yr 1850au Caethwasiaeth Achosion y Rhyfel a’r Argyfwng Arwahanu Ymladd y Rhyfel Abraham Lincoln Y Cymry a’r Rhyfel Y Rhyfel a’r Gorllewin Rhyddhau’r Caethweision Ennill y Rhyfel Adluniad a’i Fethiant
  • HTH-2157: The Age of the Castle (20) (Semester 1)
    This module explores the following themes: 1. Introduction: From the ‘Castle Story’ to Current Thinking; 2. The Origin of the Castle; 3. ‘The King of the Castle’: Great Towers and Keeps; 4. ‘An Englishman’s Home is his Castle’?: The Castle as Lordly Residence; 5. The Castles of the Crusaders 1098-1291; 6. Castles and the Chivalric Ideal; 7. The Castles of Wales 1066-1415; 8. Castles and Elite Landscapes; 9. The Decline of the Castle?; 10. Romantic Ruins? Artists, Poets and the Heritage Industry You will be given an opportunity to focus in-depth on these themes and on the underpinning primary sources in your seminars.
  • HTH-2159: History in Practice (20) (Semester 2)
  • HTH-2163: Nazi Germany 1933-1945 (20) (Semester 1)
  • HTH-2164: Violence in Early Mod Britain (20) (Semester 1)
  • Students should chose 60 credits of modules, they do not have to take Dehongli'r Gorffennol/Debating History but it does remain an option. They do, have to take at least one general module (code beginning HGH/HGC/HGW) over level 5 and 6 as a whole

Year 3 Modules

Compulsory Modules

40 credits from:

  • HSW-3019: Native Wales & the Normans (40) (Semester 1 + 2)
  • HDH-3075: History Dissertation (40) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The report and dissertation will set the chosen research in its broader context e.g. historiography, theoretical framework, geographical and historical framework. It will set research questions and a structure will be worked out. It will describe and analyse the chosen topic using a range of relevant secondary and primary evidence. The project will be written up in an ordered and academic manner.
    or
    HDG-3075: Traethawd Hir Hanes (40) (Semester 1 + 2)
    Bydd yr adroddiad a'r traethawd hir yn gosod yr ymchwil Hanes Cymru a ddewiswyd yn ei chyd-destun ehangach e.e. hanesyddiaeth, fframwaith theoretig, fframwaith daearyddol a hanesyddol. Bydd yn gosod cwestiynau ymchwil a bydd strwythur yn cael ei lunio. Bydd yn disgrifio ac yn dadansoddi'r pwnc a ddewiswyd gan ddefnyddio ystod o dystiolaeth wreiddiol ac eilaidd berthnasol. Ysgrifennir adroddiad ar y project mewn dull trefnus ac academaidd.
  • HSH-3138: British Country House from1750 (40) (Semester 1 + 2)
  • HSH-3144: The Norman Conquest (40) (Semester 1 + 2)
  • HSH-3146: Gender Sex & Society 1400-1800 (40) (Semester 1 + 2)
  • HSH-3147: Politics&Culture in the 1960s (40) (Semester 1 + 2)
  • Students must take EITHER the Dissertation OR a Special Subject

Optional Modules

60 credits from:

  • QXE-3012: Detective Fiction (20) (Semester 1)
    This module covers nineteenth-century works by Poe, Collins and Conan Doyle; English ‘classical’ stories of the early twentieth century (Chesterton, Christie); American ‘hard boiled’ versions (Hammett, Chandler), and modernist and postmodernist variants (Borges, Auster). The module will situate the text in some historical and cultural contexts, and focus on the relationship between form and ideology in the genre.
  • QXE-3028: Literature in the Community (20) (Semester 1)
  • QXE-3031: Welsh Writing in English (20) (Semester 2)
    ‘Modern Welsh Writing in English’ will consider a range of texts, principally written in English, emerging from modern Wales. The module explores the development of a tradition of Anglophone Welsh writing from the late nineteenth century, across the twentieth century and up to the contemporary moment. In so doing seeks to investigate the varied ways in which Welsh writers – male and female, from North and South (and beyond), rural and industrial, and across a range of genres and forms – have articulated the Welsh experience in all its diversity. The module will also introduce students to some of the current critical and theoretical approaches being adopted in the study of Welsh writing.
  • QXE-3051: 19thC British Writers in Italy (20) (Semester 2)
    This course explores the dynamic place Italy – its literature, art, landscape and culture – held for nineteenth-century British writers. Through reading a variety of texts, including poetry, novels, travel writing/guides and art criticism, we will examine the ways in which writers commented on a number of identities, at individual, national and international levels. Students will be encouraged to draw on source material from a number of disciplines, in order to understand the complex dialectical relationships between cultures, particularly the intersection between literature and various visual and plastic arts. Of central importance will be the concepts of the ‘other’ and of ‘cultural capital’, both of which will be supported by current scholarship on post-Waterloo tourism to Italy and publishing practices in the long nineteenth century. Emphasis will be placed on Romantic authors, including Byron, the Shelleys and Jameson, though may also include their Victorian counterparts such as the Brownings and George Eliot.
  • QXE-3080: Chaucer: Comedy, Calamity and (20) (Semester 2)
    This module provides an opportunity to examine a range of works by Geoffrey Chaucer, one of the most interesting and important authors of late medieval English literature. Through an analysis of the Canterbury Tales alongside The House of Fame, The Book of the Duchess, Troilus and Criseyde, and selections from the Legend of Good Women, Chaucer’s literary accomplishments will be examined with the aim of understanding his place in the English canon. During the seminars there will by opportunity to explore the wide range of themes and motifs employed in Chaucer’s works, as well as his extraordinary versatility in tackling different literary genres. Students will also engage with a diversity of theoretical and critical approaches to Chaucer’s work and modern adaptations of his texts, reflecting this medieval author’s continued appeal in the modern world. This module is an ideal companion to any of the other level three medieval literature modules.
  • QXE-3086: Shakespeare's Afterlives (20) (Semester 2)
    In order to explore the concept of literary afterlives, the weekly seminars alternate between the study of a Shakespeare play and the investigation of instances of the ‘afterlife’ of that particular play. For example, a seminar on A Midsummer Night’s Dream is followed by a seminar on Angela Carter’s novel Wise Children, a text riddled with references to the play and its adaptations as well as to the ‘Shakespeare industry’ as a whole. The module encourages students to be alert to examples of the use and abuse of Shakespeare in our own contemporary contexts, and to respond creatively as well as critically to the plays and other texts under discussion. Participation in seminars is stimulated by a variety of means, including weekly presentations by pairs of students and a final colloquium on the essay projects being researched by members of the group.
  • QXE-3088: Bob Dylan (20) (Semester 2)
    SEMINARS Material to be studied in seminars will include: Critical distinctions between modernist, mass, and popular cultures; `Folk music¿ and Dylan's early career; Rock music and Dylan's transition to electric performance; The relationship between biography and critical analysis; Dylan and religion; Dylan and literature; Textual analysis of the song lyric; Dylan and the visual arts; The transition from analogue to digital reproduction and dissemination; Bootleg culture.
  • QXP-3093: Experimental Writing (20) (Semester 1)
  • QXE-3094: Realms of Magic (20) (Semester 2)
    This module will cover the development of the romance genre from its earliest form in Marie de France’s and Chrétien de Troyes’ work through to insular productions such as Amis and Amiloun, Emaré, King of Tars, Isumbras, Sir Amadace, Bevis of Hampton, and Floris and Blancheflour. The range of texts will remain flexible, and their early modern versions will also form part of the discussion; the transformations and adaptations of these romances in medieval manuscripts and early modern prints will also be addressed. Topics as varied as spiritual instruction, courtly love, political governance, war, sexual fulfilment and magic will be investigated alongside incest, race, gender and ideology. The versatility of the genre will be explored in its development into other genres, in particular, but not exclusively, in early modern drama, and the endurance of its appeal will be judged with reference to the transformation of the genre in the early modern period. Connections will be established with Shakespeare’s plays and Spenser’s Faerie Queene. The module will end with analyses of adaptations of romance in the modern period (novel, film productions).
  • QXE-3096: Medieval Women's Literature (20) (Semester 1)
    What texts were medieval women writing and reading? This module examines women’s textual culture in an historical period in which many male-authored works encouraged women to be ‘chaste, silent and obedient,’ in spite of an assumption that women were naturally inclined towards lust and gossip. The module explores texts from the range of literature written and read by women, and the ways in which female-produced works (those written, translated, read, commissioned, performed and discussed in medieval England) were in dialogue with the constructions of medieval womanhood current during this period. The texts studied in seminar offer opportunity to hear, amongst others, the intimate thoughts and words of Margery Kempe, Julian of Norwich, the Paston wives and Marie de France, on topics as broad as love, marriage, sex, death and religion, as recorded in travel narratives, letters, devotions, lyrics and other literature – all of which contributed to the rich textual culture of the Middle Ages. This module is an ideal companion to any of the other level three medieval literature modules.
  • QXE-3099: The English Dissertation (40) (Semester 1 + 2)
    This module involves the production of an extended piece of critical writing of a length and quality appropriate to the culmination of the undergraduate degree scheme. Drawing on knowledge and critical methodologies learned earlier in the degree, students will be assisted via lectures and individual supervisions in devising, refining, developing and presenting a substantial piece of critical work on a topic of their choosing. The series of introductory lectures and workshops will focus on how to develop the initial research idea into a workable project presented in appropriate scholarly form. Critical self-reflection will be developed via the proposal and oral presentation in the first semester, and via discussions with the supervisor, which are held at key stages in the development of the project in both semesters.
  • QXE-3107: EM Lit: Sex, Sects and Scandal (20) (Semester 1)
    Beginning with English constructions of nationhood in the 1590s, this module will examine the pressures that are placed upon Tudor notions of English identity by the ways in which early modern texts engage with Britishness. From here, the module will move to explore seventeenth century Anglophone literature in Wales, Ireland and Scotland. Authors to be studied might include Edmund Spenser, Thomas Nashe, Thomas Deloney, Thomas Heywood, William Shakespeare, Katherine Philips, Henry Vaughn, William Drummond and Roger Boyle.
  • QXE-3109: Victorian Networks (20) (Semester 1)
  • Students may not take a dissertation in both English Literature and the other discipline of the Joint Honours programme.

20 credits from:

  • HGW-3003: Re-igniting the Dragon (20) (Semester 1)
  • HWH-3070: History Workplace Module S1 (20) (Semester 1)
    The student normally spends one day a week during the appropriate semester, and in total about 70 hours, working in an archives office, an archaeological unit or a museum service undertaking specific tasks of a practical as well as an academic nature as given them by the officer(s) in charge. These typically include drawing up inventories, collating field evidence, drawing up catalogues of discrete manuscript or artefact collections, as well as at times dealing with public enquiries. Currently the Department has agreements with most of the archive record offices in north Wales, but especially at Caernarfon and Llangefni, with the Gwynedd Archaeological Trust, with Oriel Bangor and Oriel Môn at Llangefni and the regimental Museum at Caernarfon. Approved excavation training courses may qualify if of sufficient duration and rigour and conform to the Course Guidelines. Students should also be aware that there are health and safety implications to all placements.
  • HTA-3111: Ancestral Landscapes (20) (Semester 1)
    1. Introduction and the chronolgy of later prehistoric Britain and Ireland 2. Mesolithic background and the nature of hunter gatherers 3. The Mesolithic/ Neolithic transition 4. The environment, forest clearances and the role of cereals and meat in Neolithic diets 5. Settlements, houses and mobility 6. Neolithic material culture: pottery, stone tools, axes and flint mines 7. Places for the ancestors: the role of the dead in Neolithic society 8. Monuments 1: chambered tombs 9. Monuments 2: causewayed enclosures 10. Monuments 3: curses, henges and stone circles 11. Theory 1: Prehistoric landscapes, phenomenology and experience 12. Theory 2: The natural world: natural places and human animal relations 13. Ireland: a case study 14. Early Bronze Age: Introduction 15. Places for the dead: Earlier Bronze Age burial and ceremony 16. Early Bronze Age; elements of continuity, elements of change 17. Early Bronze Age/ Middle Bronze AGe transition 18. Dividing the land: Later Bronze Age Settlement 19. Later Bronze Age burial and ceremony 20. The production and consumption of prestige goods. 21. Regional archaeoloiges? 22. Revision session
  • HGH-3112: Civil War: Eng & Wal 1558-1660 (20) (Semester 1)
    The course concentrates upon political and religious history - but social, cultural, economic and intellectual aspects are also considered where they are relevant to the core of the course. Major topics explored include: The ‘crisis’ of the 1590s; The impact of the arrival of the Stuart dynasty; Divisions in English Protestantism; Charles I’s Personal Rule, and the outbreak of civil war; The course of the conflict, and attempts at a settlement; The reasons for the regicide; The English Republic and the restoration, 1649-1660
  • HTH-3112: Reformation & Counter-Reforma. (20) (Semester 2)
    The nature of the late medieval region; Luther's teaching; the early spread of the Reformation in town; the Peasants war; radical reformation and protestant divisions; the reformation in kingdoms and principalities; Calvinism and its association with revolt; the origins and nature of the counter-reformation; comparison of sixteenth century protestantism and catholicism.
  • HTA-3114: Experimental Archaeology (20) (Semester 2)
    1. Introduction: experimental archaeology today and its links with ethnoarchaeology 2. The history of experimental archaeology 3. Experiment by design: designing experiments, recording data and methodology 4. Prehistoric metallurgical practices: copper and bronze production 5. Stone and flint technologies; production and use-wear analysis 6. Prehistoric metallurgical practices: iron production 7. Food production: cooking with stone and food storage pits 8. Making prehistoric roundhouses 9. Cremation pyres: a case study on Early Bronze Age practices 10. Taphonomies: understanding the formation of the archaeological record through experimental archaeology 11. Experiencing experiments and materials; revision lecture
  • HTA-3117: Roman Frontier Society (20) (Semester 2)
    One of the key themes of this module is the interaction between the Roman army and native populations, and the subsequent evolution of distinct frontier societies. Contextualisation will be central to the investigation of the archaeology. Examination of material evidence from military and civilian sites will include settlement, burial and environmental evidence. Iconographic and epigraphic evidence will also be examined, as will contemporary written sources (e.g. the Vindolanda letters). Key issues explored will centre on continuity and change, and topics will include syncretism and native resistance. The history of Roman scholarship and its influence on perceptions of frontier life forms an important aspect of this course, with particular emphasis given to current post-colonial approaches.
  • HTA-3118: Field Archaeology in Britain (20) (Semester 1)
    Lectures 1. Course introduction: outline of course aims, content, assessment. 2. Research designs and regional sampling. 3. Desk-based research: (using HERs, literature searches (including grey literature), accessing aerial photographs, historical documents, place name research, map regression analysis). 4. Surveying upstanding monuments: building recording; setting up a site grid (EDM and tapes); surveying earthworks; fieldwalking strategies. 5. Geophysical surveys: magnetometer, resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, GPR 6. Setting up an archaeological excavation: SMCs, landowner permissions, logistics, sampling strategy, schedule. 7. Doing an excavation: excavation techniques: dryland, wetland, contexts 8. Doing an excavation: recording techniques (planning, section drawing, small finds) 9. Doing an excavation: sampling strategies (soil samples, dating samples) 10. Excavating human remains 11. Planning post-excavation analyses and presenting sites to the public: the importance of outreach Workshops 1. Interpreting aerial photography and geophysical surveys: formation processes, site and landscape stratigraphy, plotting data 2. Making maps (downloading data from Edina, Illustration, plotting data) 3. Designing an excavation strategy for three different case-study sites 4. Environmental soil sampling; sorting of soil residues (course residues) and presentation and analysis of data 5. Interpreting archaeological field illustrations (e.g. sections and plans); site formation processes and stratigraphy; writing stratigraphic reports Fieldtrips 1. Using the HER and grey literature searches: Gwynedd Archaeological Trust (2 hours) 1. Setting up a site grid and surveying upstanding remains (10 hours) 2. Building recording (5 hours)
  • HGH-3119: Britain 1945-1990 (20) (Semester 2)
    1. Britain at the outbreak of war; 2. Dawn of a new Jerusalem; 3. The Attlee governments, 1945-51; 4. The affluent society; 5. The Wilson governments; 6. Social attitudes and class; 7. Thatcherism to the Third Way; 8. The break-up of Britain.
  • HTA-3123: Supervising Archaeolog FieldWk (20) (Semester 1)
    Practical skills: Archaeological fieldwork supervision: maintaining records and taking responsibility for decisions as a supervisor or officer on an archaeological field project in the roles of context officer, drawing officer, photo officer, finds officer, sample officer, surveying officer, health and safety officer, trench supervisor, site visitor guide, deputy site director. Archaeological post-excavation supervision: taking responsibility for decisions as a supervisor or officer on an archaeological field project in the roles of environmental sample post-processing officer, finds post-processing officer, plan digitization officer, report writing officer. Theoretical knowledge: Principles of archaeological stratigraphy, GIS and CAD applications in archaeology, UK archaeological heritage legislation; organising and financing an excavation
  • HTH-3124: Heritage and Identity (20) (Semester 1)
    Individual, group, local, regional, national and global identities; museums; political and cultural role of archaeology and history, the heritage in minority groups, the heritage of elites, oral culture, heritage and the nation state, the creation of heritage-based identities in past societies
  • HGH-3127: Europe Early Middle Ages (20) (Semester 2)
    1. The fall of the western Roman empire; 2. The foundation of the `barbarian¿ kingdoms; 3. Merovingians and Carolingians; 4. Charlemagne; 5. The papacy and monasticism; 6. Justinian and the Byzantine revival; 7. Culture and society; 8. Towns and economy; 9. The Vikings and the foundation of Normandy; 10. The creation of the caliphate of Cordoba. Students taking the course will study these topics using both primary sources (such as Gregory of Tours, Paul the Deacon, Einhard¿s Life of Charlemagne) and the modern historiography.
  • HTW-3127: Wales, Renaissance & Europe (20) (Semester 2)
  • HTC-3132: Rhyfel Mawr trwy lygaid y Cym. (20) (Semester 2)
    (Wythnos 1) Cyflwyniad Darlith 1 - Adrodd hanes y Rhyfel Sut mae’r ddealltwriaeth o’r Rhyfel Mawr wedi newid dros y degawdau Seminar 1 - Trafodaeth o sut mae’r myfyrwyr yn edrych ar y Rhyfel; Dadansoddi delweddau poblogaidd o'r rhyfel ar y teledu, gan roi sylw arbennig i raglen Y Rhwyg (1988), a gyflwynwyd gan Dr John Davies (Wythnos 2) 1880-1914 Darlith 2 - Sôn am ryfel; poeni am ryfel; paratoi at ryfel; ysu am ryfel? Darlith 3 - Gorffennaf i Awst 1914 (Wythnos 3) Gwleidyddiaeth: Lloyd George, y Rhyddfrydwyr a’r Sosialwyr Darlith 4 - Cymeriad Lloyd George; Cyfraniad Lloyd George; Chwedl Lloyd George; Atgofion Lloyd George Darlith 5 - Sosialwyr a’r Rhyfel (Wythnos 4) Her i’r hen syniadau am wareiddiad Darlith 6 - Gwrthwynebwyr Cydwybodol; Merched Cymru a’r Rhyfel Seminar 2 - Ymladd a gwrthod ymladd: Sosialwyr a’r Rhyfel / Gwrthwynebwyr Cydwybodol. Dadansoddi’r disgrifiadau a gafwyd yn y wasg o’r rhai a wrthwynebodd y Rhyfel (Wythnos 5) Ennill y Rhyfel; colli’r heddwch Darlith 7 – Buddugoliaeth Lloyd George? Cytundeb Versailles Darlith 8 – Dirwasgiad a Dadrithiad: y 1920au; Gwersi 1914 a’r ymgais i gymodi â Hitler: y 1930au (Wythnos 6) Yn sgil y Dadrithio Darlith 9 – Ymateb llenyddol yn y degawdau ar ôl 1918: chwedl Hedd Wyn; All Quiet on the Western Front Seminar 3 – Dadansoddi agweddau gwleidyddion Cymreig a Phrydeinig (gan gynnwys David Davies) tuag at yr ymgyrch heddwch yn y degawdau rhwng y rhyfeloedd; dadansoddi’r gwrthwynebiad a welwyd yng Nghymru i’r Ail Ryfel Byd, a’i gymharu â dadleuon y rhai a gefnogai’r ymgyrch (Wythnos 7) Y Llewod a’r Asynnod Darlith 10: Trafodaeth y 1960au: ‘Lions led by Donkeys’; pwysleisio ffolineb a gwastraff y rhyfel Seminar 4 – Dadansoddi cynnwys a phwysigrwydd cyfres fawr The Great War (BBC, 1964) (Wythnos 8) Conundrum ‘y ddau Ffrynt Gorllewinol’ Darlith 11: Y gwahaniaeth rhwng maes y gad a fodolodd yn Ffrainc a Fflandrys rhwng 1914 a 1918 a’r un dychmygol sy’n gread y cenedlaethau a edrychai nôl mewn syndod a braw Seminar 5 – Trafod yr amrywiol ffyrdd y mae’r Cymry wedi coffâu brwydr Mametz; dadansoddi rhaglen Mametz (S4C, 1987) (Wythnos 9) Atgofion hen wŷr Darlith 12 - Trafferthion gydag atgofion cyn-filwyr, er gwaethaf eu hatyniad amlwg Seminar 6 – Dadansoddi atgofion y cyn-filwyr Griffith Williams, Bob Owen a’r gwrthwynebydd cydwybodol Ithel Davies, a thrafod eu dilysrwydd (Wythnos 10) Hanes Diwylliannol y Rhyfel Darlith 13 - Rhoi’r cyfan mewn i gyd-destun diwylliannol Seminar 7 – Dadansoddi’r modd y portreadir y Rhyfel Mawr yn y Gymraeg heddiw, gan astudio cyfres Lleisiau’r Rhyfel Mawr (S4C, 2008) + Sesiwn ar gyfer cyflwyniadau’r myfyrwyr
  • HTH-3139: Norman Sicily (20) (Semester 1)
    1. Introduction - the creation of the kingdom, 1000-1130; 2. Roger II: the establishment of a new monarchy, 1130-1154; 3. Court culture and race relations; 4. Roger II¿s assizes: law and kingship; 5. Government in Sicily under the kings; 6. Reign of William I `the Bad¿, 1154-1166; 7. Reign of William II 'the Good', 1166-1189; 8. The mosaics of the Norman kingdom - Cefalu, Palermo and Monreale; 9. The church and the kings; 10. The chroniclers: Alexander of Telese and Hugh Falcandus. Students taking the course will study these topics using both primary sources (including the art produced in the kingdom) and the modern historiography.
  • HTH-3149: Britannia Rule the Waves (20) (Semester 2)
    (1) Introduction to the module, British Empire and Imperial Studies (2) Governing the Empire (3) British Policy and Trade (4) Technological Change (5) Scientific Exploration (6) The Empire: Asia (7) The Empire: America (8) The Empire: Africa (9) The Empire: Australasia (10) The British Empire and the Approach of War (11) Concluding lecture
  • HTH-3150: Britain in the Jazz Age (20) (Semester 2)
    1. War, Empire and Modernisation: The Boer War, WWI and an overview of the period. 2. Royalty and national identity: the Edwardian era; 1911 Investiture of the Prince of Wales; the Abdication Crisis. 3. Technological modernisation: Electricity, the wireless and motors. Case study of the Wembley Exhibition 4. Britain on the Breadline: health, living conditions and depression 5. Whippets, fish & chips and gambling: Workers, socialism and leisure 6. Nationalism and identity: Wales, Ireland and Scotland. 7. Ideology and the prelude to 1939 in Britain. A case study of Oswald Mosley and the British Union of Fascists. 8. Women in Love: Gender roles and fashion. A case study of the Mitford sisters 9. Bright Young People: Sexuality, aristocracy and decadence 10. Popular music: music halls, Jazz and Americanisation. 11. From bodyline bowling to mountaineering: Sport and society 1900-1939. 12. Workshop: Film and Jazz Age Britain 13. 1 day field trip to Manchester: Museum of Science and Industry and the People’s History Museum (including access to the Labour Party Archive)
  • HTC-3151: Gwladgarwyr a Gwladychwyr (20) (Semester 2)
    1. Cyflwyniad: trefedigaethau America yn yr Ymerodraeth Brydeinig 2. Radicaliaeth: Gweriniaethwyr a Cymedrolion 3. Cwrs y Rhyfel 4. Boston, Efrog Newydd a Virginia 5. Dynion Mawr: Washington, Jefferson 6. Y rhyfel mewn cyd-destun ehangach: Ffrainc a Phrydain 7. Creu gwladwriaeth: Datganiad Annibyniaeth; y Cyfansoddiad; Mesur Iawnderau 8. O’r tu allan: Americanwyr Cynhenid, Teyrngarwyr, Pobl Du a Menwod 9. Y Weriniaeth Gynnar 10. Effeithiau’r ‘Chwyldro’ a barnau cyfoes
  • HTC-3156: Rhyfel Cartref America (20) (Semester 1)
    Y Gogledd a’r De Gwleidyddiaeth yr 1850au Caethwasiaeth Achosion y Rhyfel a’r Argyfwng Arwahanu Ymladd y Rhyfel Abraham Lincoln Y Cymry a’r Rhyfel Y Rhyfel a’r Gorllewin Rhyddhau’r Caethweision Ennill y Rhyfel Adluniad a’i Fethiant
  • HTH-3157: The Age of the Castle (20) (Semester 1)
  • HTH-3163: Nazi Germany 1933-1945 (20) (Semester 1)
  • Students must take a general module (those with a code beginning HGH/HGC/HGW) at level 6 if they did not take one at level 5