Modules for course 8G55 | BA/ELCIE
BA English Language with Creative Writing (with Int Exp)

These are the modules currently offered on this course in the 2019–20 academic year.

You can also view the modules offered in the years: 2018–19.

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Year 1 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • QXP-1001: Creative Writing: Prose (20)
    This module, compulsory for creative writing students, introduces you to a wide range of creative prose-writing, both fictional and documentary and you will examine creative techniques used in short stories, autobiography, memoir, travel-writing, critical essays/literary reviews and play-scripts. It will include practical sessions in which students will begin to produce their own work in these genres, and group discussion of students’ work in progress. We will discuss the ways in which these genres are distinct from one another and yet share certain features and may in fact be merged by deliberate techniques of hybridisation. We will ask such questions as how a writer of fiction handles the transformation of personal experience as compared to the writer of memoirs. Can imaginative, speculative biographies enhance rather than falsify our knowledge of their subjects? How do writers tackle the adaptation of their work from one medium to another? As well as examining, from the practitioner's point of view, texts by leading authors and critics, you will be encouraged to work independently on your own material, helped by writing-exercises and longer-term assignments designed to stimulate ideas and sharpen technique. You will be encouraged to present your work for class discussion and, by receiving and giving feedback in a supportive atmosphere, you will develop your skills as a close reader and an articulate critic.
  • QXP-1003: Creative Writing: Poetry (20)
    This module, compulsory for creative writing students, introduces you to the range of forms available to the poet in the twenty-first century. You will read a variety of poetry and respond through producing your own poems. You will be asked to work in a variety of forms and to justify your reasons for choosing them. The module will demonstrate the ways in which poetry is an art form particularly well suited to expressing the experience of contemporary everyday life. We will also look at connections between poetry and music and the visual arts as well as the impact of digital technologies. Poetry will be presented both in the written and spoken form, and students will be encouraged to consider the performance of poetry both in class and by attending and reviewing recommended evening poetry readings by leading poets. .
  • QXL-1110: Introduction to Language (20) Core
    The course provides an overview of a wide range of topics in the study of natural language, including: 1. What is language? 2. Morphology: words and their structure. 3. Phonetics and Phonology: language sounds and sound systems. 4. Syntax: sentence structure 5. Semantics and Pragmatics: meaning and context 6. Language variation. 7. Language change. 8. Language acquisition 9. Language pathologies 10. Language and the brain Furthermore, the course provides guidance on how to plan & write an essay as well as other assessment methods, and on how to prepare effectively for examinations.

Semester 2

  • QXP-1001: Creative Writing: Prose
    This module, compulsory for creative writing students, introduces you to a wide range of creative prose-writing, both fictional and documentary and you will examine creative techniques used in short stories, autobiography, memoir, travel-writing, critical essays/literary reviews and play-scripts. It will include practical sessions in which students will begin to produce their own work in these genres, and group discussion of students’ work in progress. We will discuss the ways in which these genres are distinct from one another and yet share certain features and may in fact be merged by deliberate techniques of hybridisation. We will ask such questions as how a writer of fiction handles the transformation of personal experience as compared to the writer of memoirs. Can imaginative, speculative biographies enhance rather than falsify our knowledge of their subjects? How do writers tackle the adaptation of their work from one medium to another? As well as examining, from the practitioner's point of view, texts by leading authors and critics, you will be encouraged to work independently on your own material, helped by writing-exercises and longer-term assignments designed to stimulate ideas and sharpen technique. You will be encouraged to present your work for class discussion and, by receiving and giving feedback in a supportive atmosphere, you will develop your skills as a close reader and an articulate critic.
  • QXP-1003: Creative Writing: Poetry
    This module, compulsory for creative writing students, introduces you to the range of forms available to the poet in the twenty-first century. You will read a variety of poetry and respond through producing your own poems. You will be asked to work in a variety of forms and to justify your reasons for choosing them. The module will demonstrate the ways in which poetry is an art form particularly well suited to expressing the experience of contemporary everyday life. We will also look at connections between poetry and music and the visual arts as well as the impact of digital technologies. Poetry will be presented both in the written and spoken form, and students will be encouraged to consider the performance of poetry both in class and by attending and reviewing recommended evening poetry readings by leading poets. .
  • QXL-1020: Intro to English Grammar (20)

Optional Modules

40 credits from:

  • QCL-1018: Disgrifio Iaith (20) (Semester 2)
  • QXL-1113: Language and Society (20) (Semester 1)
    Sociolinguistic variability means that people use language in various different ways, depending on their social background and the current situation they are in. We will consider this phenomenon using three interrelated perspectives of studying variability: • Linguistic variables: Which aspects of the English language are variable? • Social (and regional) variables: How do speakers differ & which social aspects lead to using the English language in different ways? • Situational variables: When do speakers use which variants of English? Along these lines, the basic terminology used in this field will be introduced and employed for discussion, and empirical insights gained by sociolinguists will be examined critically.
    or
    QCB-1113: Iaith a Chymdeithas (20) (Semester 1)
  • QXL-1115: Intro to Phonetics & Phonology (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    This class is an introduction to the phonetics of spoken languages, covering articulatory phonetics, acoustics, and introductory phonology. Areas covered include: anatomy of the vocal tract and terminology used to describe speech articulators, articulatory phonetics, with an emphasis on the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) and how to use it to transcribe speech, an introduction to acoustic theory as it relates to speech sounds, the nature of phonological patterns (alternation and phonotactics), melody and prosody, and the structural representation of speakers’ phonological knowledge. The knowledge and skills acquired here will be essential for many other modules and/or projects.
  • QXL-1116: Introduction to Meaning (20) (Semester 2)
    1. Introduction: What is semantics? Meaning - communication and significance. The semiotic triangle: mind language world and meaning. Lexemes. Sense / reference / denotation / connotation. 2. Semantics: Meaning - Word meaning and sentence meaning. Literal versus non literal. Utterance, sentences and propositions. Semantics and pragmatics 3. Meaning, Thought & Reality - Reference: types. Mental representations: concepts, necessary and sufficient conditions, prototypes, and relations between concepts. Linguistic Relativity. Thought & Reality. 4. Semantic Description - Words and grammatical categories. Words and lexical items, Lexical relations (homonymy, polysemy, synonymy, antonymy, hyponymy, meronymy) 5. Sentence Relations and Truth - Logic and truth, Necessary Truth, A Priori truth and Analyticity, Entailment and Presupposition. 6. Pragmatics: Making sense of each other linguistically - Context and Structure 7. Speech Act Theory & the Cooperative Principle 8. Politeness Theories 9. Critical Discourse Analysis 10. Intercultural Pragmatics

Year 2 Modules

Compulsory Modules

0 to 30 credits from:

Year 3 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • QXL-2222: History of English (20) Core
    1. Studying the History of English. 2. The Sounds and Writing of English 3. Causes and Mechanisms of Language Change. 4. The Indo-European Language Family and Proto-Indo European. 5. Germanic and the Development of English. 6. The Sounds and Words of Old English. 7. The Grammar of Old English. 8. The Rise of Middle English: Words and Sounds 9. The Grammar of Middle English and the Rise of a Written Standard. 10. The Sounds and Inflections of Early Modern English. 11. Early Modern English Verbal Constructions and Eighteenth-Century Prescriptivism. 12. Modern English.

Optional Modules

60 credits from:

  • QXE-2003: Jonson to Johnson (20) (Semester 2)
  • CXC-2008: Ymarfer Ysgrifennu (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    Rhennir myfyrwyr yn grwpiau (fel arfer o 6-8). Bydd y grwpiau'n aros gydag un tiwtor yn y semester cyntaf ac yna'n symud at diwtor arall yn yr ail semester. Gosodir tasg i bob gr p bob wythnos. Gofynnir i bawb ysgrifennu un darn o ryw 400 gair ar amrywiaeth o bynciau (ysgrif, stori, trafodaeth, cyfieithu). Bydd hwn yn cael ei farcio'n fanwl. Bydd pob gr p yn cyfarfod y tiwtor ar awr benodedig bob wythnos. Yn ystod yr awr hon dychwelir gwaith pob aelod o'r gr p iddo, a thrafodir pob camgymeriad neu wendid yng ngwaith yr holl gr p yr wythnos honno. Bydd hyn yn arwain at drafodaethau ymarferol ar sut i ddefnyddio'r Gymraeg. Y bwriad yw sicrhau hyfforddiant trwyadl mewn iaith a mynegiant.
  • QXL-2201: Sounds and Sound Systems (20) (Semester 2)
    1. articulatory phonetics, 2. spectrographic analysis, 3. the interaction of melody and prosody, 4. the nature of phonological rules, 5. the structural representation of speakers’ phonological knowledge.
  • QXL-2204: Morphosyntax (20) (Semester 1)
    This module provides an intermediate level framework in which to both study and apply key ideas, terms and concepts on the fields of morphology and syntax. There are two goals for this course. The first goal is to introduce students to more advanced ideas and principles central to the study of both morphology and syntax. The second goal is to provide students with the tools to apply the terms and principles to data / problem sets from a range of languages in order to conduct morphological and /or syntactical analysis. The lectures will provide students with the “big picture”, i.e. central ideas are summarized, important terms and principles defined and theoretical implications outlined. In the tutorials, students discuss key elements in detail and reflect on theoretical implications and apply the knowledge gained to cross linguistic examples and/or data sets. The following are representative topics: 1: Review: Introduction, word structure, types of morphemes. 2: Productivity, Inflectional morphology 3: Morphological mappings of grammatical function 4: Grammatical relations 5: Dependency relations 6: Constituent structure 7: Theories of syntax
  • QXL-2235: Introduction to Bilingualism (20) (Semester 1)
    This module provides an overview of the study of bilingualism. It introduces the student to the core concepts and gives an overview of the main theories and methodologies characteristic of the field. Topics covered will include 1. Dimensions of bilingualism; 2. Definitions of bilingualism; 3. Early versus late bilingualism; 4. Bilingualism and cognition; 5. Educational policies.
  • QCL-2245: Ieithyddiaeth Gymraeg (20) (Semester 1)
    • Orthograffeg (sillafu) y Gymraeg • Agweddau canolradd o ffonoleg a seineg y Gymraeg • Agweddau canolradd o gystrawen y Gymraeg • Agweddau canolradd o forffoleg y Gymraeg • Agweddau canolradd o eirfa’r Gymraeg • Treiglo yn y Gymraeg • Agweddau canolradd o dafodieithoedd y Gymraeg • Creu ac astudio corpysau ieithyddol Cymraeg • Y Gymraeg yn y gymdeithas heddiw (e.e. ar y We, teledu) • Symud iaith, newid iaith a marwolaeth iaith o safbwynt gramadegol
  • QXL-2250: Functions of Discourse (20) (Semester 2)
    In the first part of this module we will focus on the theory of Systemic Functional Grammar (SFG) so as to grasp its basic mechanisms, and identify the main lexicogrammatical structures that are available to speakers of English. The second part will be dedicated to issues around discourse and context. We will look at theories and findings based on SFG, and analyse instances of discourse, exploiting theory to gain insights about the meaning and significance of specific linguistic choices for the discourse area they appear in. Along with theory and analysis, we will consider implications for English language education. Whilst lectures will provide the theoretical and conceptual foundations of SFG and SFG based discourse analysis, the tutorials will be used for discussion, case presentations, and exercises as appropriate for each week's topic. The following topics will be covered: 1. Introduction: SFG and its purposes 2. SFG theory: Clause as message – the textual function 3. SFG theory: Clause as exchange – the interpersonal function 4. SFG theory: Clause as representation – the ideational function 5. SFG theory: Above and below the clause 6. SFG theory: Around the clause – cohesion and discourse 7. Interpreting discourse: Approaches and findings using SFG tools 8. Working with discourse: Appraisal 9. Working with discourse: Ideation 10. Working with discourse: Conjunction and identification 11. Interpreting discourse at different levels of proficiency
  • QXL-2253: English Teaching in Classroom (20) (Semester 2)
  • QCL-2271: Amrywiaeth yn y Gymraeg (20) (Semester 2)
    • Tafodieitheg a thafodieithoedd y Gymraeg • William Labov a theori sosioieithyddiaeth amrywiaethol • Newidynnau annibynnol ieithyddol (e.e. oedran, rhyw, grŵp cymdeithasol) • Amrywiaeth yng ngwahanol rannau o ramadeg y Gymraeg (e.e. ffonoleg, geirfa, morffoleg, cystrawen, cyfnewid cod, treiglo) • Theori ac astudiaethau o newid iaith yn y cyd-destun Cymraeg a thu hwnt • Cymraeg hanesyddol (e.e. Cymraeg Canol) • Hanfodion casglu data sosioieithyddol • Hanfodion dadansoddi data sosioieithyddol (gan gynnwys sesiynau ymarferol)

40 credits from:

  • QXP-2001: C/Writing: Poetry & Short Fict (20) (Semester 2)
    This double-thin module is designed to help solve the problem that inexperienced writers have of writing in ways that are too abstract and general. You will be set exercises that sharpen dialogue and assist with the depiction of place in fiction, and exercises that demonstrate how images are most effectively evoked in poems. These ‘showing’ devices will then be placed in context by the use of models that indicate the importance of ‘telling’, that indicate how scenic devices in fiction are framed by direct authorial intervention, and how images in poems are linked to statements that further define and complicate them. Students are required to attend and review three evening poetry-readings to be given by leading poets during the course.
  • QXP-2004: Creative Writing: The Novel (20) (Semester 1)
    Creative Writing: The Novel will guide you through the ways and means of writing a novel. You will be taught methods of composition and creation of novels, including practical and analytical consideration of novelistic structure and design, viewpoint, voice and role-play, and developing style and tone. It also includes, with reference to the practical application and consideration of these elements, consideration of the variety of forms relevant to the contemporary novel, comparing and contrasting novels, present and past, with other forms of creative writing.
  • QXP-2005: Transformative Writing (20) (Semester 1)
    Some of today's well known works of literature were produced by writers 'writing back' to and transforming certain source materials. Examples include Peter Carey's prize-winning tnrsformation of Dickens' 'Great Expectations' in 'Jack Maggs' (1997), and Gregory Maguire's transformation of Baum's 'Wizard of Oz' in 'Wicked: The Life and times of the Wicked Witch of the West' (1995). This module examines the ideas and chanllenges of transformative writing, how such writing differs from adaptation, and how professional writers have employed it in their works. Students will be introduced to the practice of responding through creative writing, and given the chance to select their own source material (of whatever kind) in order to experiment and 'write back' to it. Students will also have the opportunity to experience and reflect upon the nature of a negotiated writing project through the use of an initial writing contract (in weeks one and two)
  • QXP-2019: Contemporary Writing (CW) (20) (Semester 2)
  • UXS-2048: Transmedia Storytelling (20) (Semester 2)
    In this module you will investigate storytelling in its various forms, writing through an awareness of critical theory, and creating original work relating to your investigations. You'll develop an awareness of issues (critical and creative) connected with storytelling, and consider the range, type and style of stories (genres, media, perspectives). You will discover how cultural norms and assumptions influence the telling of stories, exploring and applying relevant critical theory from the perspective of a writer, and reveal through your original work the nature of authorship and readership.
  • UXS-2058: Writing for Film & Television (20) (Semester 2)
    This module is designed to develop knowledge and skills in writing for film, and introduces key stylistic and textual characteristics of writing for television. The module provides an overview of television writing, separated into television drama and the situation comedy, and outlines the specific demands of these formats for screenwriters. Students are then assessed on their own original television concept in the form of a treatment and screenplay extract, plus a short critical and reflective essay. The course then goes on to present advanced theories of writing for film - developing concepts of characterisation, structure, genre, visual storytelling and the use of dialogue and action. Students will be encouraged to engage with formal screenwriting concepts such as the three-act structure, genre tropes, active protagonists and plot resolutions. However, they will also be expected to interrogate and challenge these elements of screenwriting craft, and are expected to display this engagement in their assessed work. Students will be assessed on their own original film concept in the form of a treatment and screenplay extract (for a short film or feature film), plus a critical and reflective essay. Lectures will deliver various features of writing for television and film, using screenings as contextual support material. Lectures will initially present some basic concepts of screenwriting such as script formatting, style, structure, genre, plotting, characterisation and dialogue, before moving on to deal specifically with television drama, situation comedy, the short film and the feature film. Seminar time will be spent discussing various aspects of screenwriting outlined in the lectures. Students will be encouraged to engage with, and challenge, elements of the craft of screenwriting, and to carry out creative screenwriting tasks in groups. Students will also critically peer evaluate the work of their cohort, and analyse published screenplays, applying knowledge gained in the lectures. Students will be required to develop professional writing habits and to give and receive critically constructive comment and advice. Proposed films and television programmes to be screened include: The Sopranos (Chase, 1999-2007), The Wire (Simon, 2002-08), Red Riding (Jarrold, 2009), The Singing Detective (Potter, 1986), The Prisoner (McGoohan, 1967-68), Oz (Fontana, 1997-2003), Twin Peaks (Frost/Lynch, 1990-91), The IT Crowd (Linehan, 2006- ), Spaced (Wright, 1999-2001), The Office (Gervais/Merchant, 2001-3), Father Ted (Linehan, 1995-8). The Third Man (Reed, 1949), Brief Encounter (Lean, 1945), The Devil¿s Backbone (Del Toro, 2001), Intacto (Fresnadillo, 2001), Hunger (McQueen, 2008), Dead Man's Shoes (Meadows, 2004), The Sea Inside (Amenábar, 2004), The White Ribbon (Haneke, 2009), Festen (Vinterberg, 1998), Uzak (Ceylan, 2002), Sympathy for Mr Vengeance (Park, 2002), Let the Right One In (Alfredson, 2008), The Road (Hillcoat, 2009), Sexy Beast (Glazer, 2000), No Country for Old Men (Coen, 2007)

Year 4 Modules

Compulsory Modules

40 credits from:

  • QXP-3099: Creative Writing Dissertation (40) (Semester 1 + 2) Core
    This module involves the production of an extended piece of creative writing of high quality, with an attached ‘criticism in practice’ piece, an introduction to the work, and relevant bibliographic and ‘creative’ references. The focus of the dissertation is the piece of creative writing, which can be undertaken in any genre (after agreement with supervisor) and must be preceeded by a detailed (2 3 page) plan of work to be completed. The critical piece can be in a style similar to that of a critical literature essay, or it can be more focused on creative practice or the contextualisation of that creative practice, and can use the student’s own work as one of the reference points, as well as containing references to the work of other writers. The length of the dissertation varies according the genre and is the subject of discussion with the supervisor, but as a guide the total number of words for a prose fiction submission would be between 8,000 and 10,000 words. The deadline for submission of the dissertation is noon on Friday of week ten of semester two.
  • QXL-3341: Dissertation (40) (Semester 1 + 2) Core
    Topics vary depending on individual students choices, and the emphasis is on individual study. However, they relate to a wide array of issues in linguistics and/or English Language studies. However, classes will include: • How to formulate a research question • Producing a research proposal • Research methodologies • Statistics
    or
    QCB-3341: Traethawd Hir/Dissertation (40) (Semester 1 + 2) Core
    Topics vary depending on individual students’ choices. However, they relate to a wide array of issues in linguistics and/or English Language studies.
  • Students must choose to do their dissertation in either English Language or Creative Writing.

Optional Modules

0 to 40 credits from:

  • QXP-3011: Discovering Cities (20) (Semester 1)
  • QXP-3025: Fantastic Fictions (20) (Semester 2)
  • UXS-3049: Advanced Screenwriting (20) (Semester 1)
    Lectures will deliver various discourses on the history and development of adaptations, and interrogate the relationship of various media to film. Lectures will also examine a range of concepts related to adaptation, including authorship, visual storytelling, narratology and intertextuality. These concepts will then be applied to film adaptations screened in the same week. Seminar time will be spent discussing theories of adaptation, and also provide an opportunity for students to carry out creative adaptation tasks in groups, such as conceiving short film ideas, and developing adaptations from non-literary sources, such as music and photography, and other visual arts. Students will need to demonstrate an understanding of key theories related to the comparative textual analysis of an adaptation to its source material in assessed essays. However, the module is heavily focused on the creative act and process of adaptation, and offers the chance for students to radically imagine pre-existing texts in other media in their assessed coursework. Proposed films to be screened include: Adaptation (Jonze, 2002), Throne of Blood (Kurosawa, 1957), American Psycho (Harron, 2000), The Innocents (Clayton, 1961), The Others (Amenábar, 2001), The Watchmen (Snyder, 2009), Don't Look Now (Roeg, 1973), The Shining (Kubrick, 1980), Apocalypse Now (Coppola, 1979), Stalker (Tarkovsky, 1979), Zatoichi (Kitano, 2003), Where the Wild Things Are (Jonze, 2009), La Jetée (Marker, 1962), 12 Monkeys (Gilliam, 1995), Naked Lunch (Cronenberg, 1991), A Cock & Bull Story (Winterbottom, 2005), Elephant (Clarke, 1989), Elephant (Van Sant, 2003), The Five Obstructions (Leth/Von Trier, 2003).
  • QXP-3093: Experimental Writing (20) (Semester 1)
  • UXS-3412: Playable Fiction (20) (Semester 2)
    The creative writer is constantly challenged by the evolution of literary form, striving to create fresh and original narratives that depart from the conventional. Modernism, postmodernism, and now digital media are all avenues of exploration and experimentation. This module focuses on the latter domain, as writers approach narrative through the creation of games. Story-games, such as hypertexts, interactive fictions, and visual novels, necessitate unconventional, and even unnatural, structures and perspectives. By creating playable narratives, students on this course will open their writing up to new expressions, forms, and genres. Students will discuss and explore critical and creative responses to these texts, applying new techniques and awareness to their creative writing practice.
  • Only students who are taking the English Language dissertation should take modules from this section.

40 to 80 credits from:

  • QXL-3313: EFL Theory (20) (Semester 1)
    This module provides an overview of TEFL theory by examining a wide range of contexts in which language teaching and learning takes place. Topics will include the following: 1. The use of English within a global context. 2. Language awareness in the classroom. 3. English teaching methodologies. 4. Analysis of teaching English to speakers of other languages based on research articles and DVD material: affective factors and classroom interaction. 5. Implementing and evaluating curriculum change.
  • QXL-3316: Language Disorders &Bilinguals (20) (Semester 2)
    This module will cover the following topics: 1. introduction to language impairment; 2. language impairment and autism, 3. Specific Language Impairment, 4. assessing language impairment in bi or multi-lingual children, 5. language impairment in Williams Syndrome, 6. acquired language disorders – Neurolinguistics, 7. aphasia.
  • QXL-3318: L2 speech learning (20) (Semester 2)
    Lectures will include an overview of the field of L2 speech learning; introduction to the major concepts in the field; contrastive analysis; role of the first language; transfer; interlanguage; current L2 speech learning models; cross-language phonetic similarity; foreign accent and the factors involved in (un)successful learning; segmental and suprasegmental production and perception; and implications for foreign language teaching.
  • QXL-3320: SLA and Language Teaching (20) (Semester 2)
    The topics covered in this module would be the following: 1. Background to SLA Research 2. Individual differences in L2 users and L2 learners 3. L1 transfer: Code-switching and Second Language Learning 4. Theories of L2 acquisition 5. The role of age in L2 acquisition 6. The goals of language teaching and assessment 7. The L2 user and the native speaker 8. Embedding SLA research into Language teaching
  • QXL-3329: Teaching EFL (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    This module provides an introduction to the teaching of EFL through practice and theory and by examining a range of contexts in which English language teaching and learning takes place. Topics will include the following: 1. The nature of EFL teaching contexts. 2. Methodologies employed in the EFL classroom. 3. The role of the teacher of EFL. 4. Strategies used teaching vocabulary, grammar, writing, speaking, reading & listening. 5. Factors affecting lesson planning and materials choice/design. 6. Reflective practice – evaluating teaching and lesson aims.
  • QXL-3335: Bilingual & Acquisition Issues (20) (Semester 1)
    Topics will change from year to year and may include: 1. Bilingual social interaction 2. Bilingual first language acquisition 3. Second language acquisition 4. Multilingualism 5. Issues of identity 6. The bilingual brain
  • QXL-3349: Psycholinguistics (20) (Semester 1)
    This module provides a basic overview of how the mind and the brain process language. There are two goals for this course. The first goal is to introduce students to key findings and central debates in psycholinguistic research. The second goal is to provide students with the tools to critically examine the existing literature. The lectures will provide students with the “big picture”, i.e. central topics are summarized, important studies discussed and open questions outlined. In the tutorials, students discuss key studies in detail and reflect on methodologies, results and implications. The following topics will be covered: 1: Introduction to Language Science and what is psycholinguistics? 2: Speech production and comprehension 3: Word processing 4: Sentence processing 5: Discourse processing 6: Reference and non-literal language 7: Language Acquisition 8: Reading 9: Bilingualism 10: Aphasia 11: Right Hemisphere Language Functions
  • QCL-3370: Agweddau ar Ddwyieithrwydd (20) (Semester 1)
    • Cymru a’r Gymraeg yn y cyd-destun dwyieithog • Diffinio dwyieithrwydd • Dwyieithrwydd unigol vs. dwyieithrwydd cymdeithasol • Caffael iaith mewn cyd-destun dwyieithog • Addysg ddwyieithog yng Nghymru a thu hwnt • Polisïau iaith yn y cyd-destun dwyieithog Cymreig • Cyfnewid côd o safbwynt cymdeithasol a gramadegol • Agweddau seicoieithyddol o ddwyieithrwydd • Agweddau pobl ar ddwyieithrwydd ac ieithoedd lleiafrifol • Newid iaith, marwolaeth iaith a dyfodol y Gymraeg
  • QXL-3372: Welsh Linguistics (20) (Semester 2)
    Topics covered in this module include the following: • The history of Welsh, from a linguistic and sociodemographic point of view • The grammar of contemporary Welsh (e.g. syntax, morphology, phonology, vocabulary) • Variation in spoken Welsh • Initial consonant mutation: rules and usage • Welsh-English bilingualism and its reflexes (e.g. code-switching) • Attitudes to the Welsh language • Welsh in education • Language change in Welsh • Minority language maintenance and the future of Welsh
  • QXL-3376: Cognitive Discourse Analysis (20) (Semester 1)
    The module will start by considering what kinds of thoughts, concepts, and cognitive processes can be accessed through language, and then discuss each step of a research process that involves verbalisation of thought: from identifying a suitable research question via data collection and transcription to analysis, interpretation, and triangulation with other kinds of data. The main emphasis will lie on the systematic analysis of linguistic choices, aiming to identify indicators for specific cognitive phenomena that are of interest for the research purpose at hand. In this process, insights from the wider field of cognitive linguistics highlight the significance of specific linguistic choices. While lectures will provide the theoretical and conceptual foundations needed for doing CODA, the tutorials will be used for discussion and exercises as appropriate for each step of the analysis procedure. The following topics will be covered: 1. Introduction: CODA and its purposes 2. Scientific background I: Cognitive Linguistics 3. Scientific background II: Cognitive Psychology 4. Research questions for CODA 5. Data collection techniques and data preparation (transcription and unitisation) 6. Content analysis 7. Resources for linguistic analysis I: Cognitive Linguistics 8. Resources for linguistic analysis II: Functional grammar and discourse structure analysis techniques 9. Linguistic feature analysis I: Mental representations 10. Linguistic feature analysis II: Problem solving processes 11. Interpreting results and establishing relations to other findings
  • QXL-3377: Using Corpora: Theory&Practice (20) (Semester 2)
    This module introduces students to the theoretical and practical issues of using corpora in linguistic studies and helps them to develop the background, knowledge and skills needed in order to develop and utilize a corpus based approach in their own research projects. The goals of this module are two-fold. First the students will be introduced and become familiar with the technical aspects of course based approaches and research. Then, attention will be directed to looking at how corpora and corpuses based approaches are used in a range of linguistic and language oriented studies. The lectures will provide students with the “big picture”, i.e. different research domains will be explored, central topics are summarized, important studies discussed and open questions outlined. In the tutorials, students discuss key studies in detail and reflect on methodologies, results and implications. The following topics will be covered: 1. Introducing corpus linguistics, corpus design, types of corpora and corpus annotation 2. Corpus analysis: concordance, wordlist, keyword analysis 3. Integrating stats and making statistic claims 4. Corpora in grammatical studies 5. Corpora in diachronic studies 6. Metaphor and Corpus Linguistics (A. Deignan) 7. Corpus Approaches to Critical Metaphor Analysis (J. Charteris-Black) 8. Corpora in critical discourse analysis (C. Hart) 9. Corpora language variation research 10. Corpora in sociolinguistic studies 11. Corpora in language education - focus on TEFL.
  • Students taking the English Language dissertation should take 40 credits from this section. Students taking one of the Creative Writing dissertations should take 80 from this section.