Modules for course LV11 | BA/HEC
BA History/Economics

These were the modules for this course in the 2016–17 academic year.

You can also view the modules offered in the years: 2017–18; 2018–19.

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Year 1 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • ASB-1101: Quantitative Methods (20)
    Manipulation of algebraic expressions and the solution of equations; Simultaneous linear equations, quadratic equations, and economics applications; Descriptive statistics: measures of location and dispersion; Measuring uncertainty using probability; Gradients, rates of change, rules of differentiation; Marginal functions and elasticities, maximisation of a function of one variable, profit maximisation; Functions of two variables, joint production; Financial mathematics: compound interest and discounting, net present value and investment appraisal.
    or
    ADB-1101: Dulliau Meintiol (20)
    • Cyflwyniad i’r modiwl • Egluro ymddygiad sefydliadol • Yr Amgylchedd • Dysgu • Diwylliant • Personoliaeth • Symbyliad • Grwpiau • Arweinyddiaeth • Elfennau strwythur • Gwrthdaro
  • ASB-1300: CORE Economics (20) or
    ACB-1300: Economeg CORE (20)

Semester 2

  • ASB-1101: Quantitative Methods
    Manipulation of algebraic expressions and the solution of equations; Simultaneous linear equations, quadratic equations, and economics applications; Descriptive statistics: measures of location and dispersion; Measuring uncertainty using probability; Gradients, rates of change, rules of differentiation; Marginal functions and elasticities, maximisation of a function of one variable, profit maximisation; Functions of two variables, joint production; Financial mathematics: compound interest and discounting, net present value and investment appraisal.
    or
    ADB-1101: Dulliau Meintiol
    • Cyflwyniad i’r modiwl • Egluro ymddygiad sefydliadol • Yr Amgylchedd • Dysgu • Diwylliant • Personoliaeth • Symbyliad • Grwpiau • Arweinyddiaeth • Elfennau strwythur • Gwrthdaro
  • ASB-1300: CORE Economics or
    ACB-1300: Economeg CORE

40 to 60 credits from:

  • HXH-1001: Apocalypse Then: 14th century (20) (Semester 1)
    During the fourteenth century Europe suffered a series of unremitting catastrophes. Famine, pestilence, war, papal schisms, urban and rural rebellion, constitutional conflict and economic stagnation fired the furnace in which the first nation states of Europe were to be forged. This course will examine the causes and consequences of these events.
    or
    HXC-1001: Apocalyps:Y 14eg ganrif (20) (Semester 1)
  • HXH-1002: Birth of Modern Europe (20) (Semester 2)
    The Renaissance; state formation; multiple monarchies (Valois France, the Habsburg Dominions, centre and peripheries in Britain and Ireland); the Reformation in Britain and on the Continent.
    or
    HXC-1003: Genedigaeth yr Ewrop Fodern (20) (Semester 2)
  • HXH-1004: Intro Modern History1815-1914 (20) (Semester 1)
    This module provides an introduction to nineteenth-century history, in particular: - Key events and dates - The political geography of Europe - Industrial Revolutions - Workers - Workers’ Political Movements - Middle Classes - Liberalism and Conservatism - Elites - Revolutions - Nationalism and Nation States - The Disintegration of Multinational Empires - War and Diplomacy - Imperialism It also provides an introduction to basic study skills, in particular: - The Library - Planning, Literature Search, Bibliography - Essay Writing - References, Footnotes, Plagiarism
    or
    HXC-1004: Cyflwyniad Hanes Modern (20) (Semester 1)
    Bydd y modiwl hwn yn rhoi arweiniad i hanes y bedwaredd ganrif ar bymtheg, yn arbennig: - y chwyldro amaethyddol a’r chwyldro diwydiannol - yr elit a’r dosbarth canol - Rhyddfrydiaeth a Cheidwadaeth - gweithwyr a'r werin - mudiadau gwleidyddol gweithwyr - chwyldroadau - cenedlaetholdeb a hunaniaeth genedlaethol - rhyfel a diplomyddiaeth - Imperialaeth

Optional Modules

20 credits from:

  • ASB-1103: Intro to Business and Mgmt (10) (Semester 1)
    • Introduction to the module • Explaining Organisational Behaviour • The Environment • Learning • Culture • Personality • Motivation • Groups • Leadership • Elements of structure • Conflict
    or
    ADB-1103: Busnes a Rheolaeth (10) (Semester 1)
    • Cyflwyniad i’r modiwl • Egluro ymddygiad sefydliadol • Yr Amgylchedd • Dysgu • Diwylliant • Personoliaeth • Symbyliad • Grwpiau • Arweinyddiaeth • Elfennau strwythur • Gwrthdaro
  • ASB-1104: Introduction to Marketing (10) (Semester 2)
    Core marketing concepts; Forces of the marketing environment, and their impact; Markets, targeting, segmentation and positioning; Consumer buying behaviour and the decision process; The marketing plan and its implementation; Place, Product, Price and Promotion.
    or
    ACB-1104: Cyflwyniad i Farchnata (10) (Semester 2)
    Cysyniadau craidd marchnata; Grymoedd yr amgylchedd marchnata a’u heffaith; Marchnadoedd, targedu, segmenteiddio a lleoli; Ymddygiad prynu defnyddwyr a’r modd y bydd defnyddwyr yn gwneud penderfyniadau prynu; Y cynllun marchnata a’i weithrediad Dosbarthiad, cynnyrch, pris a hyrwyddo.
  • ASB-1110: Mgmt & Financial Accounting (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    Financial accounting:- Measuring and reporting the financial position of an organisation; Measuring and reporting the financial performance of an organisation; Book-keeping and the preparation of company accounts. Management accounting:- Marginal analysis; Full costing, activity-based costing; Budgeting, accounting for control.
    or
    ACB-1110: Cyfrifeg Rheolaeth ac Ariannol (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    Cyfrifeg ariannol: Mesur sefyllfa ariannol sefydliad a rhoi adroddiad ar hynny; Mesur perfformiad ariannol sefydliad a rhoi adroddiad ar hynny; Cadw cyfrifon a pharatoi cyfrifon cwmni. Cyfrifeg rheolaeth: Dadansoddiad ffiniol; Costiad llawn, costiad wedi’i seilio ar weithgaredd; Cyllidebu, cyfrifo ar gyfer rheolaeth.
  • SXL-1114: Law for Non-Lawyers (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The module introduces the student to the English Legal System, providing a framework to study what is Law, how the system operates, and the system in a social context. The module examines the court structure, both civil and criminal, the judiciary, lawyers and the role and significance of lay participation in the system (magistrates, juries and tribunal members) and the development of Human Rights Law. It will also provide students with an introduction to areas of substantive law such as the essentials of a contract, the tort of negligence, and the principle of natural justice.
  • ASB-1200: Business Study Skills (10) (Semester 1)
    Writing academic essays and reports; Referencing and bibliographies; Sourcing information using libraries, databases and the web; Basic statistics and presentation of data; Internet, email and Blackboard; Word processing using MS Word; Spreadsheets using MS Excel; Presentations using MS PowerPoint; Communication and presentation skills; Career and employability awareness.
    or
    ACB-1200: Sgiliau Astudio Busnes (10) (Semester 1)
    Ysgrifennu traethodau ac adroddiadau academaidd; Cyfeirnodau a llyfryddiaethau; Dod o hyd i wybodaeth gan ddefnyddio llyfrgelloedd, cronfeydd data a’r we; Ystadegau sylfaenol a chyflwyno data; Rhyngrwyd, e-bost a Blackboard; Prosesu geiriau gydag MS Word; Taenlenni gydag MS Excel; Cyflwyniadau gydag MS PowerPoint; Sgiliau cyfathrebu a chyflwyno; Ymwybyddiaeth o yrfaoedd a chyflogadwyedd.
  • ASB-1202: Financial Mrkts & Institutions (10) (Semester 2)
    Motivation for the existence of financial markets and financial intermediaries; Main types of financial instruments, financial markets and financial intermediaries; Unique characteristics of banks and recent developments in the banking sector; Different concepts relating to market efficiency; Financial crises and contagion risk for the real economy; Regulation in the financial sector: motivation and recent developments; Theory of central banking: monetary policy, supervision and lender of last resort.
    or
    ADB-1202: Marchnadoedd Sefyd Ariannol (10) (Semester 2)
    Elfennau sy'n arwain at fodolaeth marchnadoedd ariannol a chyfryngwyr ariannol; Prif fathau o offer ariannol, marchnadoedd ariannol a chyfryngwyr ariannol. Nodweddion unigryw banciau a datblygiadau diweddar yn y sector bancio; Gwahanol gysyniadau'n ymwneud ag effeithiolrwydd y farchnad; Argyfyngau ariannol a risg i hynny ymledu i'r economi wirioneddol; Rheolaethau yn y sector ariannol: ysgogiad a datblygiadau diweddar; Theori bancio ganolog: polisi ariannol, goruchwyliaeth a benthyciwr pan fetho popeth arall.

0 to 20 credits from:

  • HXA-1005: Archaeology: An introduction (20) (Semester 1)
    What is archaeology?; what archaeologists study; the history of archaeological principles and techniques; archaeological techniques: surveying, excavation, scientific analysis and dating; interpretation in archaeology; internet tools and resources, aerial photography, stratigraphy and experimental archaeology.
  • HXH-1005: Intro to History and Heritage (20) (Semester 2)
    Definitions of history, heritage and archaeology; the development of museums; cabinets of curiosities; new heritage sites; heritage agencies; the state and heritage management; heritage and landscape conservation; industrial heritage; heritage and identity.
  • HXA-1006: Intro. to British Prehistory (20) (Semester 1)
    What is prehistory?; homo erectus and the earliest human societies; from ancient to modern ¿ the Middle Palaeolithic; late glacial hunters of the Upper Palaeolithic; managing the land ¿ the Mesolithic; the Meso/Neo transition; an introduction to the Neolithic; tombs for the ancestors - death and burial; communal monuments; Bronze Age beakers and barrows - rise of the individual; Stonehenge and its landscape; settlement and agriculture - the earlier/later Bronze Age transition; the production and deposition of metalwork; houses and households in later prehistory; enclosures and Iron Age 'hillforts'; Iron Age settlement and agriculture; ritual and burial practices; Late Iron Age Britain and the Romans; regional variation; social change in prehistory.
  • HXW-1007: Wales: Princes to Tudors (20) (Semester 1)
    Wales in the age of Owain Gwynedd and Lord Rhys; Gerald of Wales; rise of Llywelyn ap Iorwerth in Gwynedd and over much of the rest of Wales; the reign of Dafydd ap Llywelyn and succession to Gwynedd; the hegemony and downfall of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, prince of Wales; poetry and history writing in medieval Wales; Welsh political aspirations in l4th century; Owain Glyndŵr and his movement; Brutus, 1485 and political prophecy; Wales and the Reformation; Wales and the Renaissance; Wales and 16th-century politics – the Acts of Union.
  • HXA-1008: Intro. to Historic Archaeology (20) (Semester 2)
    This course will provide a foundation for the period demonstrating the main developments using examples and showing how interpretations have changed. For the Roman Period, the course will examine the conquest and military archaeology; the countryside (villas, native settlements, farming and mineral extraction); towns; craft and the economy; religion and burial; and the end of Roman Britain. For the Early Medieval Period, the course will examine the archaeology of western Britain from the fifth to seventh centuries; Anglo-Saxon settlement and pagan cemeteries; Anglo-Saxon rural settlement; the origins of Anglo-Saxon towns; the conversion and Anglo-Saxon monasteries and churches; the Picts; the Viking impact; and the archaeology of late Anglo-Saxon England. For the Later Medieval Period, the course will examine the Norman Conquest and castles; rural settlement; the countryside; urban settlement; craft and trade; and church archaeology, including that of monasteries.
  • HXH-1009: War, Society and the Media (20) (Semester 2) or
    HXC-1009: Rhyfel, Cymdeithas, Cyfryngau (20) (Semester 2)
  • HCH-1050: The Past Unwrapped (20) (Semester 1)
    1. Introduction: From Past to Present: Some ideas on how to make the best of your existing skills as you move to university-level study. Learn some of the basics of studying History and/or Archaeology at Bangor. 2. Library skills and making intelligent use of the web: Looking at what to expect in the university library, how to use reading lists, how much to read and what to do with all those electronic resources at your disposal. 3. From chaos to order: organisation and note-taking. How to plan and organise your work, and how to make wise decisions when taking notes from books, articles and lectures. 4. Avoiding plagiarism: Learn why cutting and pasting from the web is bad practice, and why academic misconduct is treated very seriously. Learn as well how to avoid this by referencing effectively i.e. using evidence, footnotes and compiling solid bibliographies. 5. Essays and making a good (grammatical) impression: Understand what the essay question actually wants you to do, how to structure your work, and how to develop an argument. Gain insight into some of the common errors in History and Archaeology essays, and see why good spelling and punctuation are crucial. 6. Historiography: How to make sense of all these academics saying different things and disagreeing with each other. What are the differences (and similarities) between ‘academic’ and ‘popular’ history? 7. Analysis and critical thinking: Or, how to move beyond just describing the past. Understand what your tutor means by telling you to be more critical. 8. Make your voice heard: competent communication: Understand why it’s important for you to communicate your ideas clearly, and how you can prepare effectively for presentations. 9. Documents and sources: Learn how historians use different types of documents and artefacts, and explore how you can analyse them yourself. 10. Far-reaching feedback: What is the purpose of feedback, and how are different types of assignments marked? Learn that you need to look beyond your mark to improve your work. 11. Exam technique: How to keep it together in exams, and how to deduce what exam questions actually want you to do.
    or
    HCC-1050: Dechrau o'r Dechrau (20) (Semester 1)
    1. Rhagarweiniad: O'r Gorffennol i'r Presennol: Rhai syniadau ar sut i wneud y defnydd gorau o'ch sgiliau presennol wrth i chi symud ymlaen i astudio ar lefel prifysgol. Dysgu rhai o egwyddorion sylfaenol astudio Hanes ac/neu Archaeoleg ym Mangor. 2. Sgiliau llyfrgell a defnyddio'r we yn ddeallus: Edrych ar yr hyn y dylech ei ddisgwyl yn llyfrgell y brifysgol, sut i ddefnyddio rhestrau darllen, faint i'w ddarllen a beth i'w wneud gyda'r holl adnoddau electroneg hynny sydd ar gael i chi. 3. O anrhefn i drefn: rhoi trefn ar bethau a chymryd nodiadau. Sut i gynllunio a threfnu eich gwaith, a sut i wneud penderfyniadau doeth wrth gymryd nodiadau o lyfrau, erthyglau a darlithoedd. 4. Osgoi llên-ladrad: Dysgu sut mae torri a phastio deunydd o'r we yn ffordd wael iawn o weithio a pham mae camymddwyn academaidd yn cael ei drin fel mater difrifol iawn. Dysgu'n ogystal sut i osgoi hyn drwy gyfeirnodi effeithiol, h.y. defnyddio tystiolaeth, troednodiadau a llunio llyfryddiaethau cadarn. 5. Traethodau a gwneud argraff (ramadegol) dda: Deall beth yn union mae cwestiwn y traethawd eisiau i chi ei wneud, sut i drefnu eich gwaith a sut i ddatblygu dadl. Cael golwg ar rai camgymeriadau cyffredin mewn traethodau Hanes ac Archaeoleg a gweld pam fod sillafu da ac atalnodi yn allweddol. 6. Hanesyddiaeth: Sut i wneud synnwyr o'r holl academyddion hyn yn dweud pethau gwahanol ac anghytuno â'i gilydd. Beth yw'r gwahaniaethau (a'r tebygrwydd) rhwng hanes 'academaidd' a 'phoblogaidd'? 7. Dadansoddi a meddwl yn feirniadol: Neu, sut i fynd ymhellach na dim ond disgrifio'r gorffennol. Deall beth mae eich tiwtor yn ei olygu pan fydd yn dweud wrthych am fod yn fwy beirniadol. 8. Cyfle i ddweud eich dweud: cyfathrebu medrus: Deall pam mae'n bwysig i chi gyfathrebu eich syniadau'n glir, a sut y gellwch baratoi'n effeithiol at gyflwyniadau. 9. Dogfennau a ffynonellau: Dysgu sut mae haneswyr yn defnyddio gwahanol fathau o ddogfennau ac arteffactau ac edrych sut y gellwch eu dadansoddi eich hun. 10. Adborth (sylwadau) pellgyrhaeddol: Beth yw diben adborth (sylwadau ar eich gwaith), a sut y caiff mathau gwahanol o aseiniadau eu marcio? Dysgu bod angen i chi edrych y tu hwnt i'ch marc i wella eich gwaith. 11. Sut i weithredu mewn arholiadau: Sut i beidio â chynhyrfu a gwneud yn dda mewn arholiadau, a gweld beth yn union mae cwestiynau arholiad yn gofyn i chi ei wneud.

Year 2 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • ASB-2108: Probability and Optimisation (10)
    • Partial differentiation, and optimisation of functions of two variables; • Integration; • Probability distributions and random variables; • Measures of central tendency and dispersion, mean and variance; • Discrete random variables, the Binomial and Poisson distributions; • Continuous random variables, the Normal distribution, and statistical tables; • Populations and samples, estimators and estimates; • Confidence intervals.
  • ASB-2307: Microeconomics (20)
    • Demand and supply microfoundations • Rational choice • Individual and market demand • Uncertainty and consumer behaviour • The cost of production and profit max • Market structure • Strategic interdependence • Game theory • General equilibrium • Markets with asymmetric info • Externalities • Government regulation • Productivity and comparative advantage • International trade theory.

Semester 2

  • ASB-2110: Statistical Methods (10)
    Constrained optimisation; Hypothesis tests; Type I and Type II errors; Level of significance; Correlation and causality; Linear Regression model; Ordinary Least Squares estimation; Testing the significance of a regression.
  • ASB-2308: Macroeconomics (20)
    • The role of macroeconomics, macroeconomic variables and statistics; • Introduction to schools of thought; • The classical model; • The Keynesian model; • Aggregate demand and supply analysis; • The Phillips curve; • The role of expectations; • Open economy macroeconomics; • Macroeconomic policy debates: monetary policy, fiscal policy, exchange rate policy, government debt management; • Theories of consumption; • Theories of growth.

Optional Modules

60 credits from:

Year 3 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • ASB-3312: International Economics (10)
  • ASB-3313: Financial Economics (10)
  • ASB-3514: Industrial Organisation (10)
    1.Market structure. a. Static imperfect competition. b. Dynamic imperfect competition. 2. Sources of market power. a. Product differentiation. b. Advertising and marketing. c. Information and reputation. 3. Pricing strategy. a. Price discrimination. b. Intertemporal price discrimination. c. Bundling. 4. Competition and regulation. a. Mergers and acquisitions. b. Entry and exit.

Semester 2

  • ASB-3301: Macroeconomics (10)
    Economic growth, physical and human capital, technological progress; Labour market, skills and unemployment; Business cycles, consumption and investment; Fiscal policy, public finances; Monetary policy, money and inflation; International macro, currencies and exchange rates.
  • ASB-3316: Applied Economics (20)
    • Introduction to econometric software. • Sourcing data. • Organisation and manipulation of data. • Programming of software. • Applied skills in analysis of data including summarising and visualisation, and a variety of regression techniques. • Analysis of outputs. • Application to economic problems: o Analysing economic relationships o Testing economic theories

40 credits from:

  • HDH-3075: History dissertation (40) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The report and dissertation will set the chosen research in its broader context e.g. historiography, theoretical framework, geographical and historical framework. It will set research questions and a structure will be worked out. It will describe and analyse the chosen topic using a range of relevant secondary and primary evidence. The project will be written up in an ordered and academic manner.
  • HSH-3092: Ruled by an Orange (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The `Glorious Revolution'; the constitutional and religious settlement of 1689; the style and policies of William and Mary as monarchs; court culture (especially the music of Purcell, and the architecture of Hampton Court); the role of parliament after the revolution; party politics; religion after the 1689 toleration act; the impact of the growth of the state; political thought in the age of John Locke; the electorate, the press, and the emergence of the `public sphere'; Jacobitism; the campaign for a reformation of manners.
  • HSH-3093: Ruled by an Orange (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The `Glorious Revolution'; the constitutional and religious settlement of 1689; the style and policies of William and Mary as monarchs; court culture (especially the music of Purcell, and the architecture of Hampton Court); the role of parliament after the revolution; party politics; religion after the 1689 toleration act; the impact of the growth of the state; political thought in the age of John Locke; the electorate, the press, and the emergence of the `public sphere'; Jacobitism; the campaign for a reformation of manners.
  • HSH-3098: Going to the Devil - Henry II (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The course will examine a number of important episodes of Henry II¿s life and reign, and also key themes such as the growth in the efficiency and expertise of royal government, the development of the English common law, and the patronage or punishment of subjects¿the right balance of which was vital to successful kingship. Close attention will also be given to Robert of Torigni¿s Chronicle, Gerald of Wales¿s The Conquest of Ireland, and a number of textbooks produced at the time such as the legal treatise known as Glanvill, The Dialogue of the Exchequer, and The Civilized Man¿the first book of etiquette. The castles constructed by Henry II will also be considered, as will some of the wall-paintings and manuscript illuminations produced during his reign, so as to provide a rounded picture of the environment in which Henry lived.
  • HSH-3099: Going to the Devil - Henry II (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The course will examine a number of important episodes of Henry II¿s life and reign, and also key themes such as the growth in the efficiency and expertise of royal government, the development of the English common law, and the patronage or punishment of subjects¿the right balance of which was vital to successful kingship. Close attention will also be given to Robert of Torigni¿s Chronicle, Gerald of Wales¿s The Conquest of Ireland, and a number of textbooks produced at the time such as the legal treatise known as Glanvill, The Dialogue of the Exchequer, and The Civilized Man¿the first book of etiquette. The castles constructed by Henry II will also be considered, as will some of the wall-paintings and manuscript illuminations produced during his reign, so as to provide a rounded picture of the environment in which Henry lived.
  • HSH-3118: Anarchism- Europe & USA 19&20c (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    Background: a historical introduction to anarchism Precursors of anarchism (Godwin, Thoreau) Proudhon: founder of anarchism or reactionary? Individualist anarchism and wage theory (Warren, Andrews) Critical approaches to Bakunin The antagonism between Marx and Bakunin in the First International Anarchy and terror: Nechaev, Most, Henry The Chicago Haymarket riot The Conquest of Bread: Peter Kropotkin From terrorism to general strike: anarcho-syndicalism The Makhnovshchina (anarchist Ukraine), 1917¿1921 `The world¿s most dangerous woman¿: Emma Goldman The Sacco-Vanzetti case, 1920¿1927 Anarchism in the Spanish Civil War 1936/37 Libertarian influences in the `1968¿ student protests Anarchism in film, art and literature
  • HSH-3119: Anarchism- Europe & USA 19&20c (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    Background: a historical introduction to anarchism Precursors of anarchism (Godwin, Thoreau) Proudhon: founder of anarchism or reactionary? Individualist anarchism and wage theory (Warren, Andrews) Critical approaches to Bakunin The antagonism between Marx and Bakunin in the First International Anarchy and terror: Nechaev, Most, Henry The Chicago Haymarket riot The Conquest of Bread: Peter Kropotkin From terrorism to general strike: anarcho-syndicalism The Makhnovshchina (anarchist Ukraine), 1917¿1921 `The world¿s most dangerous woman¿: Emma Goldman The Sacco-Vanzetti case, 1920¿1927 Anarchism in the Spanish Civil War 1936/37 Libertarian influences in the `1968¿ student protests Anarchism in film, art and literature
  • HSH-3132: Nationalism in UK 1916-1997 (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
  • HSH-3133: Nationalism in UK 1916-1997 (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
  • Students must take EITHER the Dissertation OR a Special Subject (taught over both Semesters)

Optional Modules

20 credits from: