Modules for course Q1Q3 | BA/LEL
BA Ling with Eng Lit

These were the modules for this course in the 2018–19 academic year.

You can also view the modules offered in the years: 2019–20; 2020–21.

Find out more about studying and applying for this degree.

Use the buttons after the module titles (where available) to see a brief description of the content, or:
Show all descriptions
Hide all descriptions

Year 1 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • QXE-1013: Reading, Thinking, Writing (20)
    The course will include analytical reading of drama, prose, poetry and film in English from the medieval period to the present era; an introduction to critical and theoretical approaches to the reading of literature; integration of close textual study and critical/theoretical approaches, as the foundation for all other modules in the School; practical development of skills of literary commentary, essay writing, and critical discussion.
  • QXL-1110: Introduction to Language (20) Core
    The course provides an overview of a wide range of topics in the study of natural language, including: 1. What is language? 2. Morphology: words and their structure. 3. Phonetics and Phonology: language sounds and sound systems. 4. Syntax: sentence structure 5. Semantics and Pragmatics: meaning and context 6. Language variation. 7. Language change. 8. Language acquisition 9. Language pathologies 10. Language and the brain Furthermore, the course provides guidance on how to plan & write an essay as well as other assessment methods, and on how to prepare effectively for examinations.

Semester 2

  • QXL-1117: Intro to Morphology & Syntax (20)
    The module will be split between the study of syntax and the study or morphology in the ration 60:40. 1. Morphemes: the parts of a word. 2. Types of affix and affix ordering 3. The productivity of affixation. 4. Word-formation without affixes. 5. Compounding 6. Syntactic classification: Parts of Speech and functional relations. 7. Syntactic structure and Immediate Constituent Analysis. 8. Recursion and the generation of syntactic structure. 9. Heads and their dependents 10. Syntactic relations within the sentence. 11. Relations between sentence types.

Optional Modules

40 credits from:

  • QCB-1113: Iaith a Chymdeithas (20) (Semester 1) or
    QXL-1113: Language and Society (20) (Semester 1)
    Sociolinguistic variability means that people use language in various different ways, depending on their social background and the current situation they are in. We will consider this phenomenon using three interrelated perspectives of studying variability: • Linguistic variables: Which aspects of the English language are variable? • Social (and regional) variables: How do speakers differ & which social aspects lead to using the English language in different ways? • Situational variables: When do speakers use which variants of English? Along these lines, the basic terminology used in this field will be introduced and employed for discussion, and empirical insights gained by sociolinguists will be examined critically.
  • QXL-1115: Intro to Phonetics & Phonology (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    This class is an introduction to the phonetics of spoken languages, covering articulatory phonetics, acoustics, and introductory phonology. Areas covered include: anatomy of the vocal tract and terminology used to describe speech articulators, articulatory phonetics, with an emphasis on the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) and how to use it to transcribe speech, an introduction to acoustic theory as it relates to speech sounds, the nature of phonological patterns (alternation and phonotactics), melody and prosody, and the structural representation of speakers’ phonological knowledge. The knowledge and skills acquired here will be essential for many other modules and/or projects.
  • QXL-1116: Introduction to Meaning (20) (Semester 2)
    1. Introduction: What is semantics? Meaning - communication and significance. The semiotic triangle: mind language world and meaning. Lexemes. Sense / reference / denotation / connotation. 2. Semantics: Meaning - Word meaning and sentence meaning. Literal versus non literal. Utterance, sentences and propositions. Semantics and pragmatics 3. Meaning, Thought & Reality - Reference: types. Mental representations: concepts, necessary and sufficient conditions, prototypes, and relations between concepts. Linguistic Relativity. Thought & Reality. 4. Semantic Description - Words and grammatical categories. Words and lexical items, Lexical relations (homonymy, polysemy, synonymy, antonymy, hyponymy, meronymy) 5. Sentence Relations and Truth - Logic and truth, Necessary Truth, A Priori truth and Analyticity, Entailment and Presupposition. 6. Pragmatics: Making sense of each other linguistically - Context and Structure 7. Speech Act Theory & the Cooperative Principle 8. Politeness Theories 9. Critical Discourse Analysis 10. Intercultural Pragmatics
  • QCL-1145: Disgrifio'r Gymraeg (20) (Semester 2)
    • Rhannau ymadrodd y Gymraeg • Cystrawen a threfn geiriol sylfaenol y Gymraeg • Morffoleg sylfaenol y Gymraeg • Ffonoleg a seineg (h.y. sain) sylfaenol y Gymraeg a sut i drawsgrifio’r Gymraeg gan ddefnyddio’r IPA • Disgrifio Cymraeg ffurfiol o safbwynt ieithyddol • Cyflwyniad i ddisgrifio tafodieithoedd y Gymraeg mewn modd ieithyddol • Dylanwad y Saesneg ac ieithoedd eraill ar y Gymraeg (e.e. benthyg, ymyrraeth) • Cymharu’r Gymraeg ag ieithoedd lleiafrifol eraill • Dyfodol y Gymraeg o safbwynt gramadegol

20 credits from:

  • QXP-1001: Creative Writing: Prose (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    This module, compulsory for creative writing students, introduces you to a wide range of creative prose-writing, both fictional and documentary and you will examine creative techniques used in short stories, autobiography, memoir, travel-writing, critical essays/literary reviews and play-scripts. It will include practical sessions in which students will begin to produce their own work in these genres, and group discussion of students’ work in progress. We will discuss the ways in which these genres are distinct from one another and yet share certain features and may in fact be merged by deliberate techniques of hybridisation. We will ask such questions as how a writer of fiction handles the transformation of personal experience as compared to the writer of memoirs. Can imaginative, speculative biographies enhance rather than falsify our knowledge of their subjects? How do writers tackle the adaptation of their work from one medium to another? As well as examining, from the practitioner's point of view, texts by leading authors and critics, you will be encouraged to work independently on your own material, helped by writing-exercises and longer-term assignments designed to stimulate ideas and sharpen technique. You will be encouraged to present your work for class discussion and, by receiving and giving feedback in a supportive atmosphere, you will develop your skills as a close reader and an articulate critic.
  • QXE-1003: Intro. to Medieval Literature (20) (Semester 1)
    Introduction to Medieval Literature offers students the opportunity to study a variety of Old English literature that is evocative of the intricate decoration on the Staffordshire Anglo-Saxon hoard; riddles, Old English battle poetry and The Dream of The Rood (taught in translation). In the second part of the module students will encounter Middle English drama, romance poetry and Chaucerian verse in its original language. The transition between the Old to the Middle English period will be analysed in terms of specific themes and motifs, such as the development from pagan Germanic heroism to Christian values. Chivalry, the comic and bawdy, and piety will be the main foci in the Middle English part of the course, explored through a range of poetry, prose, drama and life writing. This module is an ideal ‘taster’ for the medieval literature modules available at levels two and three.
  • QXP-1003: Creative Writing: Poetry (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    This module, compulsory for creative writing students, introduces you to the range of forms available to the poet in the twenty-first century. You will read a variety of poetry and respond through producing your own poems. You will be asked to work in a variety of forms and to justify your reasons for choosing them. The module will demonstrate the ways in which poetry is an art form particularly well suited to expressing the experience of contemporary everyday life. We will also look at connections between poetry and music and the visual arts as well as the impact of digital technologies. Poetry will be presented both in the written and spoken form, and students will be encouraged to consider the performance of poetry both in class and by attending and reviewing recommended evening poetry readings by leading poets. .
  • QXE-1004: The Literature of Laughter (20) (Semester 2)
    The module is organised on a chronological basis, moving from Chaucer to Monty Python and beyond, taking in on the way a selection of texts by Shakespeare, Wycherley, Pope, Swift, Austen, Dickens, Twain, as well as Kate Atkinson’s Behind the Scenes at the Museum and an anthology of comic verse. The lectures place the texts in their historical and cultural contexts, while the seminars and study groups focus on the week’s specified text for close reading and discussion. Both the lectures and the smaller groups are consistently concerned with the module’s over-riding questions about the nature of literary laughter. Concepts such as wit and satire are analysed, along with some of the recurring topics of humorous writing: religion, politics, sex and gender. The major functions of laughter – for stereotyping, for self-defence, for reform, rebellion, or release of tension – are highlighted for both their continuity and their difference in specific literary and cultural contexts.
  • QXE-1014: The Gothic in Literature/Film (20) (Semester 2)
    This introductory course focuses mainly on Gothic writing from the late eighteenth century onwards, although it begins by looking at examples of the medieval and early-modern grotesque that help to set early Gothic novels in context. Organized in a loosely chronological way, this module is particularly sensitive to the ways in which Gothic texts have been used to represent contemporary cultural anxieties (such as the New Woman in the last quarter of the nineteenth century, or New Technology in the early years of the twenty-first), but it will also examine how the Gothic has been used to articulate political resistance, for example in anti-imperialist, post-colonial, and feminist works. It will also pay particular attention to the Gothic as a visual form, both analysing the representation of Gothic spaces in eighteenth and nineteenth-century literature and art, and investigating the importance of the genre to the development of cinema, from silent-era German expressionism to the present. While the precise topics covered by the module will vary from year to year, themes will include some of the following: Terror and the Sublime; Monstrosity and Deviance; Doubles and Doppelgängers; Vampires and Sexualities; Parody and Pastiche; Domesticity and ‘The Uncanny’; Cybergothic and the Post-human; Feminist and Postcolonial Rewritings; Gothic and the Young Adult Novel. Students will situate texts within their historical and political contexts, and will also gain an awareness of a range of important theories (from Freud’s notion of the Uncanny to Derrida’s theories of hauntology) that will be important to the study of literature in the rest of their degree.

Year 2 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • QXL-2235: Introduction to Bilingualism (20) Core
    This module provides an overview of the study of bilingualism. It introduces the student to the core concepts and gives an overview of the main theories and methodologies characteristic of the field. Topics covered will include 1. Dimensions of bilingualism; 2. Definitions of bilingualism; 3. Early versus late bilingualism; 4. Bilingualism and cognition; 5. Educational policies.

Optional Modules

60 credits from:

  • CXC-2008: Ymarfer Ysgrifennu (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    Rhennir myfyrwyr yn grwpiau (fel arfer o 6-8). Bydd y grwpiau'n aros gydag un tiwtor yn y semester cyntaf ac yna'n symud at diwtor arall yn yr ail semester. Gosodir tasg i bob gr p bob wythnos. Gofynnir i bawb ysgrifennu un darn o ryw 400 gair ar amrywiaeth o bynciau (ysgrif, stori, trafodaeth, cyfieithu). Bydd hwn yn cael ei farcio'n fanwl. Bydd pob gr p yn cyfarfod y tiwtor ar awr benodedig bob wythnos. Yn ystod yr awr hon dychwelir gwaith pob aelod o'r gr p iddo, a thrafodir pob camgymeriad neu wendid yng ngwaith yr holl gr p yr wythnos honno. Bydd hyn yn arwain at drafodaethau ymarferol ar sut i ddefnyddio'r Gymraeg. Y bwriad yw sicrhau hyfforddiant trwyadl mewn iaith a mynegiant.
  • QXL-2201: Sounds and Sound Systems (20) (Semester 1)
    1. articulatory phonetics, 2. spectrographic analysis, 3. the interaction of melody and prosody, 4. the nature of phonological rules, 5. the structural representation of speakers’ phonological knowledge.
  • QXL-2202: Meaning, Mind and Truth (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    1) Language, meaning and mind 2) Universals and Variation in Language, Thought & Experience 3) Embodiment and Conceptual structure 4) Encyclopaedic Semantics 5) Metaphor 6) Metonymy 7) Word meaning and radial categories 8) Mental Spaces and Compositional Semantics 9) Conceptual Blending 10) The semantic basis of grammar
  • QXL-2204: Morphosyntax (20) (Semester 2)
    This module provides an intermediate level framework in which to both study and apply key ideas, terms and concepts on the fields of morphology and syntax. There are two goals for this course. The first goal is to introduce students to more advanced ideas and principles central to the study of both morphology and syntax. The second goal is to provide students with the tools to apply the terms and principles to data / problem sets from a range of languages in order to conduct morphological and /or syntactical analysis. The lectures will provide students with the “big picture”, i.e. central ideas are summarized, important terms and principles defined and theoretical implications outlined. In the tutorials, students discuss key elements in detail and reflect on theoretical implications and apply the knowledge gained to cross linguistic examples and/or data sets. The following are representative topics: 1: Review: Introduction, word structure, types of morphemes. 2: Productivity, Inflectional morphology 3: Morphological mappings of grammatical function 4: Grammatical relations 5: Dependency relations 6: Constituent structure 7: Theories of syntax
  • QCL-2245: Ieithyddiaeth Gymraeg (20) (Semester 1)
    • Orthograffeg (sillafu) y Gymraeg • Agweddau canolradd o ffonoleg a seineg y Gymraeg • Agweddau canolradd o gystrawen y Gymraeg • Agweddau canolradd o forffoleg y Gymraeg • Agweddau canolradd o eirfa’r Gymraeg • Treiglo yn y Gymraeg • Agweddau canolradd o dafodieithoedd y Gymraeg • Creu ac astudio corpysau ieithyddol Cymraeg • Y Gymraeg yn y gymdeithas heddiw (e.e. ar y We, teledu) • Symud iaith, newid iaith a marwolaeth iaith o safbwynt gramadegol
  • QXL-2250: Functions of Discourse (20) (Semester 2)
    In the first part of this module we will focus on the theory of Systemic Functional Grammar (SFG) so as to grasp its basic mechanisms, and identify the main lexicogrammatical structures that are available to speakers of English. The second part will be dedicated to issues around discourse and context. We will look at theories and findings based on SFG, and analyse instances of discourse, exploiting theory to gain insights about the meaning and significance of specific linguistic choices for the discourse area they appear in. Along with theory and analysis, we will consider implications for English language education. Whilst lectures will provide the theoretical and conceptual foundations of SFG and SFG based discourse analysis, the tutorials will be used for discussion, case presentations, and exercises as appropriate for each week's topic. The following topics will be covered: 1. Introduction: SFG and its purposes 2. SFG theory: Clause as message – the textual function 3. SFG theory: Clause as exchange – the interpersonal function 4. SFG theory: Clause as representation – the ideational function 5. SFG theory: Above and below the clause 6. SFG theory: Around the clause – cohesion and discourse 7. Interpreting discourse: Approaches and findings using SFG tools 8. Working with discourse: Appraisal 9. Working with discourse: Ideation 10. Working with discourse: Conjunction and identification 11. Interpreting discourse at different levels of proficiency

40 credits from:

  • QXE-2005: Victorian Literature (20) (Semester 1)
    The Victorians lived in an era of change and contradictions: a culture in which some reaped immense rewards from mechanised industry, but feared the idea of 'mechanism'; a period which saw the growth of cities and democracy, but was attracted to images of medieval feudalism. These themes will be examined, along with: realism in the Victorian novel; the narrators of the Victorian novel; ideas of truth in art and fiction; the figure of the intellectual or 'sage'; the domestic sphere; children and orphans; women as writers and members of Victorian society; the important relationship between notions of scientific 'truth' and religious 'faith', and ideas of nationality and race as expressed in the work of Irish, Scottish and Welsh authors working within concepts associated with the British empire. This course looks at a broad range of texts including novels, poetry and essays. Authors studied may include Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Gaskell, Charlotte Bronte, John Ruskin, Robert Browning, Alfred Tennyson, Christina Rossetti, Robert Stevenson, Bram Stoker and Oscar Wilde.
  • QXE-2019: Contemporary Writing (Lit) (20) (Semester 2)
    ‘Contemporary Literatures’ introduces students to the first postmodern texts in the 1950s, and takes them right up to literature from the present day. The course asks students to investigate how literature (across a range of genres) responds to the broad historical trends and specific events of the age. While these might include residual literary traditions from the 1950s such as the theatre of ‘angry young men’ and ‘Movement’ poetry, the module will initially focus on the emergence of postmodernity. It will go on to consider how the Anglophone literary field has became more international in the second half of the twentieth century, witnessing the emergence of national literary traditions in a range of former colonies. New and contemporary movements and traditions in Anglophone literature will be explored in the second part of the course. These might include British Asian literature, post 9/11 literature, recent American drama, eco-poetry and the effect on literature of recent digital innovation.
  • QXE-2020: The Romantic Period in Britain (20) (Semester 1)
    The Romantic Period (c. 1785 -1832) was marked by social change, political strife and a growth in print culture. In many ways it was the start of the modern age, as Britain sought to define itself both internally and within a global context. This course introduces students to both canonical and non-canonical texts of the period and the ways in which they both shaped and reflected wider social and cultural concerns. It will guide students through key areas of current scholarship of the period so that they may refine their understanding of the relationship between texts and their contexts. In order to question what the term ‘Romanticism’ may entail, this course focuses not only on certain authors and texts from this period but also what may be termed Romantic spaces, including the home, nation, metropolis (both London and Edinburgh will feature prominently), border spaces, natural or picturesque settings (including Tintern Abbey and nearby Snowdon), reading rooms, theatres, the boxing ring and galleries.
  • QXE-2024: Alfred Hitchcock (20) (Semester 2)
    Alfred Hitchcock is perhaps the most notable example of a director whose films were popular both with audiences and with critics seeking to establish the credibility of film as an art form. His work provides a case-study of theories of authorship; of different national cinemas and studio systems, and of a particular genre, the thriller. In addition, the popularity and accessibility of Hitchcock’s films also raise questions concerning narrative, spectatorial pleasure, the gaze, and gender, and consequently provide an opportunity to explore the interrelation and limits of film theory and film practice
  • QXE-2027: Literature and Modernity (20) (Semester 1)
    Literature and Modernity examines literature about, or by writers from, Britain and Ireland in a period bracketed by the emergence of proto-modernist writing in the late 1890s and the emergence in the early 1950s of texts that would later be seen as postmodern. This period in Western Europe witnessed unprecedented changes in the modes of production, in relations between the sexes and between the classes, and in the development of new cultural forms like radio and cinema. While these originated in the Victorian period, they were accelerated by the social and psychological impact of the First World War, global depression, the rise of fascism, another catastrophic World War and the start of the nuclear age, historical factors that make the study of literature from this period especially rewarding. Students will study some of the ways in which authors responded to these cataclysmic shifts by considering work from a range of critical perspectives. These may include the literary movement (for example, modernism), broad historical change (for example, changes in gender roles), a major historical event (for example, the Second World War), genre, or recent trends in criticism which encourage us to look at this period’s writing from a new angle.

Year 3 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • QXL-3341: Dissertation (40) Core
    Topics vary depending on individual students choices, and the emphasis is on individual study. However, they relate to a wide array of issues in linguistics and/or English Language studies. However, classes will include: • How to formulate a research question • Producing a research proposal • Research methodologies • Statistics
    or
    QCB-3341: Traethawd Hir/Dissertation (40) Core
    Topics vary depending on individual students’ choices. However, they relate to a wide array of issues in linguistics and/or English Language studies.

Semester 2

  • QXL-3341: Dissertation
    Topics vary depending on individual students choices, and the emphasis is on individual study. However, they relate to a wide array of issues in linguistics and/or English Language studies. However, classes will include: • How to formulate a research question • Producing a research proposal • Research methodologies • Statistics
    or
    QCB-3341: Traethawd Hir/Dissertation
    Topics vary depending on individual students’ choices. However, they relate to a wide array of issues in linguistics and/or English Language studies.

Optional Modules

40 credits from:

  • QXL-3304: Language Contact & Bilinguals (20) (Semester 2)
    1. the dynamics of language contact, 2. bilingual acquisition 3. speakers’ minds as a locus of contact, 4. transfer effects in bilinguals, 5. language and social subordination, 6. language maintenance in minority language settings, 7. contact-induced language change.
  • QXL-3313: EFL Theory (20) (Semester 1)
    This module provides an overview of TEFL theory by examining a wide range of contexts in which language teaching and learning takes place. Topics will include the following: 1. The use of English within a global context. 2. Language awareness in the classroom. 3. English teaching methodologies. 4. Analysis of teaching English to speakers of other languages based on research articles and DVD material: affective factors and classroom interaction. 5. Implementing and evaluating curriculum change.
  • QXL-3317: First Language Acquisition (20) (Semester 1)
    This module provides an introduction to the study of language development. There are two goals for this course. The first goal is to introduce students to key findings and central debates in the study of language development. The second goal is to provide students with the tools to critically examine the existing literature. The lectures will provide students with the “big picture”, i.e. central topics are summarized, important studies discussed and open questions outlined. In the tutorials, students discuss key studies in detail and reflect on methodologies, results and implications. The following topics will be covered: 1. Early language development 2. Phonological development 3. First language acquisition: Syntactic development 4. Multilingual Acquisition 5. Theories of language development: Constructivist and mentalist approaches 6. Bilingual development 7. Language disorders 8. Developmental neurolinguistics
  • QXL-3320: SLA and Language Teaching (20) (Semester 2)
    The topics covered in this module would be the following: 1. Background to SLA Research 2. Individual differences in L2 users and L2 learners 3. L1 transfer: Code-switching and Second Language Learning 4. Theories of L2 acquisition 5. The role of age in L2 acquisition 6. The goals of language teaching and assessment 7. The L2 user and the native speaker 8. Embedding SLA research into Language teaching
  • QXL-3343: Language and Communication (20) (Semester 2)
    1. Theories and models of communication 2. Principles of communication and miscommunication 3. Methods of discourse analysis 4. Modes of communication 5. Contexts and areas of communication 6. Public contexts (e.g., media, journalism, political, or scientific discourse) 7. Communication in the internet 8. Classroom discourse 9. Casual contexts 10. Situated and task-based interaction
  • QXL-3347: Language Change (20) (Semester 1)
    1) The History of Grammaticalization. 2) Lexicalization: Lexical Constructionalism. 3) Mechanisms of Change (Reanalysis and Analogy). 4) Pragmatic factors. 5) The Hypothesis of Unidirectionality. 6) Clause-Internal Morphological Changes. 7) Grammaticalization across clauses. 8) Grammaticalization in Situations of Extreme Language Contact. 9) Some Basic issues in Grammaticalization and Construction Grammar. 10) Idioms and Formulaicity.
  • QXL-3349: Psycholinguistics (20) (Semester 2)
    This module provides a basic overview of how the mind and the brain process language. There are two goals for this course. The first goal is to introduce students to key findings and central debates in psycholinguistic research. The second goal is to provide students with the tools to critically examine the existing literature. The lectures will provide students with the “big picture”, i.e. central topics are summarized, important studies discussed and open questions outlined. In the tutorials, students discuss key studies in detail and reflect on methodologies, results and implications. The following topics will be covered: 1: Introduction to Language Science and what is psycholinguistics? 2: Speech production and comprehension 3: Word processing 4: Sentence processing 5: Discourse processing 6: Reference and non-literal language 7: Language Acquisition 8: Reading 9: Bilingualism 10: Aphasia 11: Right Hemisphere Language Functions
  • QCL-3370: Agweddau ar Ddwyieithrwydd (20) (Semester 2)
    • Cymru a’r Gymraeg yn y cyd-destun dwyieithog • Diffinio dwyieithrwydd • Dwyieithrwydd unigol vs. dwyieithrwydd cymdeithasol • Caffael iaith mewn cyd-destun dwyieithog • Addysg ddwyieithog yng Nghymru a thu hwnt • Polisïau iaith yn y cyd-destun dwyieithog Cymreig • Cyfnewid côd o safbwynt cymdeithasol a gramadegol • Agweddau seicoieithyddol o ddwyieithrwydd • Agweddau pobl ar ddwyieithrwydd ac ieithoedd lleiafrifol • Newid iaith, marwolaeth iaith a dyfodol y Gymraeg
  • QXL-3375: Historical Linguistics (20) (Semester 1)
    This module explores the field of historical linguistics and philology from both a theoretical and a practical viewpoint. Students will learn about theories of language change and will learn to critically evaluate studies of historical language change. They will also acquire practical skills in identifying the origins of words and grammar in languages that they know. Lectures will introduce students to the big picture and will provide them with concrete and theoretical examples of the topics being discussed, while seminars will be an opportunity to go deeper into the topics in a student-led pedagogical manner. While the lecturer will provide examples of language change (etc.) from his own experiences, students will be highly encouraged to explore languages of their own choice that they find interesting so as to find their own examples of the kinds of changes being learnt about. The following topics will be covered in the lectures and seminars: • Introduction to historical linguistics and philology, and a history of the field • Etymology and exploring Proto-Indo European • Sound change • Semantic change • Syntactic and morphological change • Reconstructive analysis and the comparative method • Issues in Germanic Philology • Issues in Celtic Philology • Historical Linguistics versus contemporary Linguistics (issues in data collation/collection and analysis)
  • QXL-3377: Using Corpora: Theory&Practice (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    This module introduces students to the theoretical and practical issues of using corpora in linguistic studies and helps them to develop the background, knowledge and skills needed in order to develop and utilize a corpus based approach in their own research projects. The goals of this module are two-fold. First the students will be introduced and become familiar with the technical aspects of course based approaches and research. Then, attention will be directed to looking at how corpora and corpuses based approaches are used in a range of linguistic and language oriented studies. The lectures will provide students with the “big picture”, i.e. different research domains will be explored, central topics are summarized, important studies discussed and open questions outlined. In the tutorials, students discuss key studies in detail and reflect on methodologies, results and implications. The following topics will be covered: 1. Introducing corpus linguistics, corpus design, types of corpora and corpus annotation 2. Corpus analysis: concordance, wordlist, keyword analysis 3. Integrating stats and making statistic claims 4. Corpora in grammatical studies 5. Corpora in diachronic studies 6. Metaphor and Corpus Linguistics (A. Deignan) 7. Corpus Approaches to Critical Metaphor Analysis (J. Charteris-Black) 8. Corpora in critical discourse analysis (C. Hart) 9. Corpora language variation research 10. Corpora in sociolinguistic studies 11. Corpora in language education - focus on TEFL.

40 credits from:

  • QXE-3012: Detective Fiction (20) (Semester 1)
    This module covers nineteenth-century works by Poe, Collins and Conan Doyle; English ‘classical’ stories of the early twentieth century (Chesterton, Christie); American ‘hard boiled’ versions (Hammett, Chandler), and modernist and postmodernist variants (Borges, Auster). The module will situate the text in some historical and cultural contexts, and focus on the relationship between form and ideology in the genre.
  • QXE-3034: Arthurian Literature (20) (Semester 2)
    This module will consider a selection of the best writing about the Arthurian legend, from the ninth century to the twentieth, with the aim of showing the development and use of this legend throughout a very long period. The choice of texts may be vary from year to year, but is likely to include the Mabinogion, Geoffrey of Monmouth, Malory, Shakespeare, Tennyson, Mark Twain and T.H. White. The main themes that inform the legend will be discussed alongside the different writers’ agendas in adapting and manipulating the core elements of the tradition.
  • QXE-3080: Chaucer: Comedy, Calamity and (20) (Semester 2)
    This module provides an opportunity to examine a range of works by Geoffrey Chaucer, one of the most interesting and important authors of late medieval English literature. Through an analysis of the Canterbury Tales alongside The House of Fame, The Book of the Duchess, Troilus and Criseyde, and selections from the Legend of Good Women, Chaucer’s literary accomplishments will be examined with the aim of understanding his place in the English canon. During the seminars there will by opportunity to explore the wide range of themes and motifs employed in Chaucer’s works, as well as his extraordinary versatility in tackling different literary genres. Students will also engage with a diversity of theoretical and critical approaches to Chaucer’s work and modern adaptations of his texts, reflecting this medieval author’s continued appeal in the modern world. This module is an ideal companion to any of the other level three medieval literature modules.
  • QXE-3105: Reading Myth (20) (Semester 2)
    This module will take as its focus the textual response to inherited mythic structures: how myth may be perceived in theoretical terms as a proairetic discourse; how it establishes affinities with certain genres (e.g. epic, tragedy, romance); and how in more contemporary cultural debates it has been problematised by expectations of falsehood. The seminar programme will range from Ancient Greek representations of myth (e.g. Medea) to medieval accounts of Scripture in dramatic narrative (e.g. Abraham and Isaac) and to varying accounts of saints’ lives. In the early modern period attention may be devoted to the changing importance of ancient mythologies in literary narrative. In the more contemporary periods, options will change from year to year, but may include explorations of such pervasive constructs as the Founding of Empire (Kipling, Lessing), The American Dream (Capote, Fitzgerald, Highsmith) and The War on Terror (Buchan, Fleming, and Porter’s Empire State).