Module UXS-3090:
Dissertation

Module Facts

Run by School of Music and Media

40 Credits or 20 ECTS Credits

Semester 1 & 2

Organiser: Dr Eben Muse

Overall aims and purpose

This modules consits of two parts, a research methods component in the autumn semester that is assessed by means of a 2,000 word research proposal, and a period of supervised research culminating in the submission of a 10,000 word dissertation. There is opportunity to employ creative methodologies for practice-based students to utilise their learning and skills in a research context through a part-practical dissertation.

Course content

This module is a period of supervised research culminating in the submission of a 10,000-word dissertation worth 40 credits. Students wishing to produce a piece of practice-based research (e.g. a fiction or non-fiction television, film, performance or radio piece) must discuss their project with their supervisor to define the weighting of practice and theory. There will be a series of 6 workshops to prepare the students with research skills and the opportunity to attend further optional workshops in the School and the College as appropriate.

Assessment Criteria

threshold

Submitted work is adequate and shows an acceptable level of competence as follows:

  • Generally accurate but with omissions and errors.
  • Assertions are made without clear supporting evidence or reasoning.
  • Has structure but is lacking in clarity and therefore relies on the reader to make links and assumptions.
  • Draws on a relatively narrow range of material.

good

Good: 50% +

Submitted work is competent throughout and occasionally distinguished by superior style, approach and choice of supporting materials. It demonstrates:

  • Good structure and logically developed arguments.
  • At least in parts draws on material that has been sourced and assessed as a result of independent study, or in a way unique to the student.
  • Assertions are, in the main, backed by evidence and sound reasoning.
  • Accuracy and presentation in an appropriate academic style.

Very Good: 60% +.

Submitted work is competent throughout and distinguished by superior style, approach and choice of supporting materials. It demonstrates:

  • Very good structure and logically developed arguments.
  • Draws on material that has been sourced and assessed as a result of independent study, or in a way unique to the student.
  • Assertions are backed by evidence and sound reasoning.
  • Accuracy and presentation in an appropriate academic style.

excellent

Submitted work is of an outstanding quality and excellent in one or more of the following ways:

  • Has originality of exposition with the student's own thinking being readily apparent.
  • Provides clear evidence of extensive and relevant independent study.
  • Arguments are laid down with clarity and provide the reader with successive stages of consideration to reach conclusions.

Learning outcomes

  1. Apply a range of study skills and methodologies appropriate to research in the Arts and Humanities.
  2. Define a coherent research question, and design and implement a programme of study to investigate this question.
  3. Embed a substantial piece of academic or practice-based research within an appropriate set of cultural, social, institutional, economic and/or critical frameworks.
  4. Work independently to deadline over a sustained period of time.

Assessment Methods

Type Name Description Weight
10000 word essay 90
Research Progress Log & Deliverables 10

Teaching and Learning Strategy

Hours
Workshop

1 hour workshop per week for the first six weeks of autumn semester plus additional workshops in weeks 11 of autumn semester and week 2 of Spring semester. Additional optional workshops available in School and College; students are expected to attend at least 2 hour long workshops in addition to the mandatory programme.

10
Tutorial

3 hours of contact periods with supervisor (usually 15mins per week with supervisor)

3
Private study 387

Transferable skills

  • Literacy - Proficiency in reading and writing through a variety of media
  • Numeracy - Proficiency in using numbers at appropriate levels of accuracy
  • Computer Literacy - Proficiency in using a varied range of computer software
  • Self-Management - Able to work unsupervised in an efficient, punctual and structured manner. To examine the outcomes of tasks and events, and judge levels of quality and importance
  • Exploring - Able to investigate, research and consider alternatives
  • Information retrieval - Able to access different and multiple sources of information
  • Inter-personal - Able to question, actively listen, examine given answers and interact sensitevely with others
  • Critical analysis & Problem Solving - Able to deconstruct and analyse problems or complex situations. To find solutions to problems through analyses and exploration of all possibilities using appropriate methods, rescources and creativity.
  • Presentation - Able to clearly present information and explanations to an audience. Through the written or oral mode of communication accurately and concisely.
  • Management - Able to utilise, coordinate and control resources (human, physical and/or financial)
  • Argument - Able to put forward, debate and justify an opinion or a course of action, with an individual or in a wider group setting
  • Self-awareness & Reflectivity - Having an awareness of your own strengths, weaknesses, aims and objectives. Able to regularly review, evaluate and reflect upon the performance of yourself and others

Subject specific skills

(Communication, media, film and cultural studies benchmark statements) 1. The ability to engage critically with major thinkers, debates and intellectual paradigms within the field and put them to productive use (5.2). 2. The development of substantive and detailed knowledge and understanding in one or more designated areas of the field (5.2). 3. The ability to carry out sustained independent enquiry (5.3). 4. The ability to formulate appropriate research questions and employ appropriate methods and resources for exploring those questions (5.3). 5. The ability to evaluate and draw upon the range of sources and the conceptual frameworks appropriate to research in the chosen area (5.3). 6. The ability to draw on research models enabled or underpinned by emergent technologies (5.3). 7. The ability to explore matters that may be new and emerging, drawing upon a variety of personal skills and upon a variety of academic and non-academic sources (5.3). 8. The ability to work in flexible, creative and independent ways, showing self-discipline, self-direction and reflexivity (6.1). 9. The ability to retrieve and generate information, and evaluate sources, in carrying out independent research (6.1). 10. The ability to communicate effectively in interpersonal settings, in writing and in a variety of media (6.1). 11. The ability to put to use a range of information communication technology (ICT) skills from basic competences such as data analysis and word-processing to more complex skills using web-based technology or multimedia, and develop, as appropriate, specific proficiencies in utilising a range of media technologies (6.1) 12. The ability to organise and manage supervised, self-directed projects (6.1).

Pre- and Co-requisite Modules

Courses including this module

Compulsory in courses:

Optional in courses: