Modules for course V400 | BA/ARCH
BA Archaeology

These were the modules for this course in the 2017–18 academic year.

You can also view the modules offered in the years: 2018–19; 2019–20.

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Year 2 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • HTA-2118: Field Archaeology in Britain (20)
    Lectures 1. Course introduction: outline of course aims, content, assessment. 2. Research designs and regional sampling. 3. Desk-based research: (using HERs, literature searches (including grey literature), accessing aerial photographs, historical documents, place name research, map regression analysis). 4. Surveying upstanding monuments: building recording; setting up a site grid (EDM and tapes); surveying earthworks; fieldwalking strategies. 5. Geophysical surveys: magnetometer, resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, GPR 6. Setting up an archaeological excavation: SMCs, landowner permissions, logistics, sampling strategy, schedule. 7. Doing an excavation: excavation techniques: dryland, wetland, contexts 8. Doing an excavation: recording techniques (planning, section drawing, small finds) 9. Doing an excavation: sampling strategies (soil samples, dating samples) 10. Excavating human remains 11. Planning post-excavation analyses and presenting sites to the public: the importance of outreach Workshops 1. Interpreting aerial photography and geophysical surveys: formation processes, site and landscape stratigraphy, plotting data 2. Making maps (downloading data from Edina, Illustration, plotting data) 3. Designing an excavation strategy for three different case-study sites 4. Environmental soil sampling; sorting of soil residues (course residues) and presentation and analysis of data 5. Interpreting archaeological field illustrations (e.g. sections and plans); site formation processes and stratigraphy; writing stratigraphic reports Fieldtrips 1. Using the HER and grey literature searches: Gwynedd Archaeological Trust (2 hours) 1. Setting up a site grid and surveying upstanding remains (5 hours) 2. Building recording (3 hours)

Semester 2

  • HTA-2120: Rethinking Archaeology (20)
    Lectures 1. The origins of archaeological theory 2. The ‘New Archaeology’ and post processualism 3. Marxist and structuralist approaches in archaeology 4. The post-processualist critique 5. Multi disciplinary approaches to the archaeological record 6. The archaeology of people and social relations 7. Towards an archaeology of gender 8. Approaches to the study and interpretation of material culture 9. Contemporary approaches to archaeological landscapes 10. Understanding the built environment 11. The archaeology of ritual and religion 12. Archaeology in theory and in practice Seminars 1. The identification of cultural groups from archaeological evidence 2. The loss of innocence and the development of the ‘New Archaeology’ 3. Symbolic and structural archaeology 4. Re-constructing an interpretive archaeology 5. Social evolution and cognitive archaeology 6. How were past societies organised? 7. Representing gender in the archaeological past 8. Art or artefact: key debates in material culture studies 9. Experiencing the past: a phenomenology of landscape 10. House form and culture 11. What is ritual and religion and can we identify them in the archaeological record? 12. Critical approaches to archaeological fieldwork

40 to 80 credits from:

  • HWA-2070: Archaeology Workplace S1 (20) (Semester 1)
    The student normally spends one day a week during the appropriate semester, and in total about 70 hours, working in an archives office, an archaeological unit or a museum service undertaking specific tasks of a practical as well as an academic nature as given them by the officer(s) in charge. These typically include drawing up inventories, collating field evidence, drawing up catalogues of discrete manuscript or artefact collections, as well as at times dealing with public enquiries. Currently the Department has agreements with most of the archive record offices in north Wales, but especially at Caernarfon and Llangefni, with the Gwynedd Archaeological Trust, with Oriel Bangor and Oriel Môn at Llangefni and the regimental Museum at Caernarfon. Approved excavation training courses may qualify if of sufficient duration and rigour and conform to the Course Guidelines. Students should also be aware that there are health and safety implications to all placements.
  • HWA-2071: Archaeology Workplace S2 (20) (Semester 2)
  • HTA-2111: Ancestral Landscapes (20) (Semester 1)
    1. Introduction and the chronology of later prehistoric Britain and Ireland 2. Mesolithic background and the nature of hunter-gatherers 3. The Mesolithic/Neolithic transition 4. The environment, forest clearances and the role of cereals and meat in Neolithic diets 5. Settlements, houses and mobility 6. Neolithic material culture: pottery, stone tools, axes and flint mines 7: Places for the ancestors: the role of the dead in Neolithic society 8. Monuments 1: chambered tombs 9. Monuments 2: causewayed enclosures 10. Monuments 3: cursus, henges and stone circles 11. Theory 1: Prehistoric landscapes, phenomenology and experience 12. Theory 2: The natural world: natural places and human-animal relations 13. Ireland: a case study 14. Early Bronze Age: Introduction 15. Places for the dead: Earlier Bronze Age burial and ceremony 16. Early Bronze Age: elements of continuity, elements of change 17. Early Bronze Age/Middle Bronze Age transition 18: Dividing the land: Later Bronze Age Settlement 19. Later Bronze Age burial and ceremony 20. The production and consumption of prestige goods 21. Regional archaeologies? 22. Revision session
  • HTA-2114: Experimental Archaeology (20) (Semester 2)
    1. Introduction: experimental archaeology today and its links with ethnoarchaeology 2. The history of experimental archaeology 3. Experiment by design: designing experiments, recording data and methodology 4. Prehistoric metallurgical practices: copper and bronze production 5. Stone and flint technologies; production and use-wear analysis 6. Prehistoric metallurgical practices: iron production 7. Food production: cooking with stone and food storage pits 8. Making prehistoric roundhouses 9. Cremation pyres: a case study on Early Bronze Age practices 10. Taphonomies: understanding the formation of the archaeological record through experimental archaeology 11. Experiencing experiments and materials; revision lecture
  • HTA-2117: Roman Frontier Society (20) (Semester 2)
    One of the key themes of this module is the interaction between the Roman army and native populations, and the subsequent evolution of distinct frontier societies. Contextualisation will be central to the investigation of the archaeology. Examination of material evidence from military and civilian sites will include settlement, burial and environmental evidence. Iconographic and epigraphic evidence will also be examined, as will contemporary written sources (e.g. the Vindolanda letters). Key issues explored will centre on continuity and change, and topics will include syncretism and native resistance. The history of Roman scholarship and its influence on perceptions of frontier life forms an important aspect of this course, with particular emphasis given to current post-colonial approaches.
  • HTA-2123: Archaeology Field School (20) (Semester 1)
    Practical skills: Archaeological excavation and survey: removing turf and topsoil cover, cleaning surfaces, sectioning and excavating features, recovering finds, soil and paleoenvironmental sampling, drawing of plans and sections, 2D and 3D photography, surveying with a total station and GPS Rover, producing written records. Archaeological post-excavation work: finds processing and recording, wet sieving soil samples, plan digitization, finds drawing and photography, report writing. Theoretical knowledge: Principles of archaeological stratigraphy, GIS and CAD applications in archaeology, UK archaeological heritage legislation; organising and financing an excavation
  • Chose between 40 to 80 credits of Archaeology modules Students on this programme must take the workplacement modules either at Level 5 or Level 6.

Optional Modules

80 credits from:

  • HGC-2003: Ail Danio'r Ddraig (20) (Semester 1) or
    HGW-2003: Re-igniting the Dragon (20) (Semester 1)
  • HGW-2003: Re-igniting the Dragon (20) (Semester 1)
  • HCG-2011: Dehongli'r Gorffennol (20) (Semester 1)
    Er y byddir yn rhoi peth sylw i rai o haneswyr mawr y bedwaredd ganrif ar bymtheg – fel Ranke, Macaulay a Marx – bydd pwyslais y cwrs ar hanesyddiaeth yr ugeinfed ganrif. Canolbwyntir gan hynny ar feddylwyr a thueddiadau allweddol ym maes hanesyddiaeth yn ystod y ganrif ddiwethaf gan astudio enghreifftiau penodol o gynnyrch y meddylwyr a’r ysgolion dan sylw. Ymysg y pynciau a astudir bydd Ysgol yr Annales, Hanesyddiaeth Farcsaidd, Hanes Merched, Hanes Llafar, a her syniadaeth ôl-strwythurol ac ôl-fodern. Neulltuir yn ogystal ddwy ddarlith i drafod agweddau ar Hanesyddiaeth Cymru yn y cyfnod diweddar.
  • HCH-2050: Debating History (20) (Semester 1)
    The first part of the course is concerned with the use of the past made by historians and commentators such as politicians, the way traditions are invented (and destroyed), and introduces the different historiographical schools. The second part covers some historiographical (ie. concerned with the art of writing history) issues with emphasis on the various ideas about the study and writing of history which have developed over the last two centuries and which students need to understand in order to engage confidently with the different approaches which professional historians take to their work. This is taught through a case-study approach where students can apply the different approaches studied in the first part of the course to specific controversial historical subjects. The course will cover the following topics: Whig and Tory history, Ranke, the professionalisation of the study of history, nations, empire, structuralism, post-structuralism, revisionism, counter-factual history, case studies may change from year to year but will include topics such as The Peasants’ Revolt, The English civil war, the outbreak of world war one; suffrage, consumerism, the Welsh in history, the Reformation. American Civil war, Cold War; Oral history; National identity.
    or
    HCG-2011: Dehongli'r Gorffennol (20) (Semester 1)
    Er y byddir yn rhoi peth sylw i rai o haneswyr mawr y bedwaredd ganrif ar bymtheg – fel Ranke, Macaulay a Marx – bydd pwyslais y cwrs ar hanesyddiaeth yr ugeinfed ganrif. Canolbwyntir gan hynny ar feddylwyr a thueddiadau allweddol ym maes hanesyddiaeth yn ystod y ganrif ddiwethaf gan astudio enghreifftiau penodol o gynnyrch y meddylwyr a’r ysgolion dan sylw. Ymysg y pynciau a astudir bydd Ysgol yr Annales, Hanesyddiaeth Farcsaidd, Hanes Merched, Hanes Llafar, a her syniadaeth ôl-strwythurol ac ôl-fodern. Neulltuir yn ogystal ddwy ddarlith i drafod agweddau ar Hanesyddiaeth Cymru yn y cyfnod diweddar.
  • HWA-2070: Archaeology Workplace S1 (20) (Semester 1)
    The student normally spends one day a week during the appropriate semester, and in total about 70 hours, working in an archives office, an archaeological unit or a museum service undertaking specific tasks of a practical as well as an academic nature as given them by the officer(s) in charge. These typically include drawing up inventories, collating field evidence, drawing up catalogues of discrete manuscript or artefact collections, as well as at times dealing with public enquiries. Currently the Department has agreements with most of the archive record offices in north Wales, but especially at Caernarfon and Llangefni, with the Gwynedd Archaeological Trust, with Oriel Bangor and Oriel Môn at Llangefni and the regimental Museum at Caernarfon. Approved excavation training courses may qualify if of sufficient duration and rigour and conform to the Course Guidelines. Students should also be aware that there are health and safety implications to all placements.
  • HTA-2111: Ancestral Landscapes (20) (Semester 1)
    1. Introduction and the chronology of later prehistoric Britain and Ireland 2. Mesolithic background and the nature of hunter-gatherers 3. The Mesolithic/Neolithic transition 4. The environment, forest clearances and the role of cereals and meat in Neolithic diets 5. Settlements, houses and mobility 6. Neolithic material culture: pottery, stone tools, axes and flint mines 7: Places for the ancestors: the role of the dead in Neolithic society 8. Monuments 1: chambered tombs 9. Monuments 2: causewayed enclosures 10. Monuments 3: cursus, henges and stone circles 11. Theory 1: Prehistoric landscapes, phenomenology and experience 12. Theory 2: The natural world: natural places and human-animal relations 13. Ireland: a case study 14. Early Bronze Age: Introduction 15. Places for the dead: Earlier Bronze Age burial and ceremony 16. Early Bronze Age: elements of continuity, elements of change 17. Early Bronze Age/Middle Bronze Age transition 18: Dividing the land: Later Bronze Age Settlement 19. Later Bronze Age burial and ceremony 20. The production and consumption of prestige goods 21. Regional archaeologies? 22. Revision session
  • HGH-2112: Civil War: Eng & Wal 1558-1660 (20) (Semester 1)
    The course concentrates upon political and religious history - but social, cultural, economic and intellectual aspects are also considered where they are relevant to the core of the course. Major topics explored include: The ‘crisis’ of the 1590s; The impact of the arrival of the Stuart dynasty; Divisions in English Protestantism; Charles I’s Personal Rule, and the outbreak of civil war; The course of the conflict, and attempts at a settlement; The reasons for the regicide; The English Republic and the restoration, 1649-1660
  • HTH-2112: Reformation & Counter-Reforma. (20) (Semester 2)
    The nature of the late medieval region; Luther's teaching; the early spread of the Reformation in town; the Peasants war; radical reformation and protestant divisions; the reformation in kingdoms and principalities; Calvinism and its association with revolt; the origins and nature of the counter-reformation; comparison of sixteenth century protestantism and catholicism.
  • HTA-2114: Experimental Archaeology (20) (Semester 2)
    1. Introduction: experimental archaeology today and its links with ethnoarchaeology 2. The history of experimental archaeology 3. Experiment by design: designing experiments, recording data and methodology 4. Prehistoric metallurgical practices: copper and bronze production 5. Stone and flint technologies; production and use-wear analysis 6. Prehistoric metallurgical practices: iron production 7. Food production: cooking with stone and food storage pits 8. Making prehistoric roundhouses 9. Cremation pyres: a case study on Early Bronze Age practices 10. Taphonomies: understanding the formation of the archaeological record through experimental archaeology 11. Experiencing experiments and materials; revision lecture
  • HTA-2117: Roman Frontier Society (20) (Semester 2)
    One of the key themes of this module is the interaction between the Roman army and native populations, and the subsequent evolution of distinct frontier societies. Contextualisation will be central to the investigation of the archaeology. Examination of material evidence from military and civilian sites will include settlement, burial and environmental evidence. Iconographic and epigraphic evidence will also be examined, as will contemporary written sources (e.g. the Vindolanda letters). Key issues explored will centre on continuity and change, and topics will include syncretism and native resistance. The history of Roman scholarship and its influence on perceptions of frontier life forms an important aspect of this course, with particular emphasis given to current post-colonial approaches.
  • HTA-2118: Field Archaeology in Britain (20) (Semester 1)
    Lectures 1. Course introduction: outline of course aims, content, assessment. 2. Research designs and regional sampling. 3. Desk-based research: (using HERs, literature searches (including grey literature), accessing aerial photographs, historical documents, place name research, map regression analysis). 4. Surveying upstanding monuments: building recording; setting up a site grid (EDM and tapes); surveying earthworks; fieldwalking strategies. 5. Geophysical surveys: magnetometer, resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, GPR 6. Setting up an archaeological excavation: SMCs, landowner permissions, logistics, sampling strategy, schedule. 7. Doing an excavation: excavation techniques: dryland, wetland, contexts 8. Doing an excavation: recording techniques (planning, section drawing, small finds) 9. Doing an excavation: sampling strategies (soil samples, dating samples) 10. Excavating human remains 11. Planning post-excavation analyses and presenting sites to the public: the importance of outreach Workshops 1. Interpreting aerial photography and geophysical surveys: formation processes, site and landscape stratigraphy, plotting data 2. Making maps (downloading data from Edina, Illustration, plotting data) 3. Designing an excavation strategy for three different case-study sites 4. Environmental soil sampling; sorting of soil residues (course residues) and presentation and analysis of data 5. Interpreting archaeological field illustrations (e.g. sections and plans); site formation processes and stratigraphy; writing stratigraphic reports Fieldtrips 1. Using the HER and grey literature searches: Gwynedd Archaeological Trust (2 hours) 1. Setting up a site grid and surveying upstanding remains (5 hours) 2. Building recording (3 hours)
  • HGH-2119: Britain 1945-1990 (20) (Semester 2)
    Britain at the outbreak of war; Dawn of a new Jerusalem; The Attlee governments, 1945-51; The affluent society ? The Wilson governments; Heath to Thatcher The decline of socialism Social attitudes and class; Youth culture Thatcherism to the Third Way; New Labour The break-up of Britain ?.
  • HTA-2123: Archaeology Field School (20) (Semester 1)
    Practical skills: Archaeological excavation and survey: removing turf and topsoil cover, cleaning surfaces, sectioning and excavating features, recovering finds, soil and paleoenvironmental sampling, drawing of plans and sections, 2D and 3D photography, surveying with a total station and GPS Rover, producing written records. Archaeological post-excavation work: finds processing and recording, wet sieving soil samples, plan digitization, finds drawing and photography, report writing. Theoretical knowledge: Principles of archaeological stratigraphy, GIS and CAD applications in archaeology, UK archaeological heritage legislation; organising and financing an excavation
  • HTH-2124: Heritage and Identity (20) (Semester 1)
    Individual, group, local, regional, national and global identities; museums; political and cultural role of archaeology and history, the heritage in minority groups, the heritage of elites, oral culture, heritage and the nation state, the creation of heritage-based identities in past societies.
  • HGH-2127: Europe, Early Middle Ages (20) (Semester 2)
    1. The fall of the western Roman empire; 2. The foundation of the `barbarian¿ kingdoms; 3. Merovingians and Carolingians; 4. Charlemagne; 5. The papacy and monasticism; 6. Justinian and the Byzantine revival; 7. Culture and society; 8. Towns and economy; 9. The Vikings and the foundation of Normandy; 10. The birth of Islam and the creation of the caliphate of Cordoba. Students taking the course will study these topics using both primary sources (such as Gregory of Tours, Paul the Deacon, Einhard¿s Life of Charlemagne) and the modern historiography.
  • HTW-2127: Wales, Renaissance & Europe (20) (Semester 2)
  • HTC-2128: Cestyll a Chymdeithas (20) (Semester 1)
    Bydd y modiwl yn edrych ar y themâu canlynol: 1. Cefndir a chyd-destun hanesyddiaethol; 2. Gwreiddiau cestyll y cyfnod; 3. Cestyll a chrefft rhyfela yn y cyfnod; 4. Castell pawb ei dŷ: cestyll fel cartrefi ac anheddau; 5. Astudiaeth achos 1: Cestyll y Croesgadwyr 1098-1291; 6. Cestyll y dychymyg a’r delfryd sifalrig; 7. Astudiaeth achos 2: Cestyll yng Nghymru 1063-1415; 8. Tirlun a phensaernïaeth gastellog; 9. Cestyll a chartrefi caerog yr Oesau Canol Diweddar; 10. Machlud Cestyll yr Oesau Canol? Ceir cyfle yn ystod y seminarau i archwilio’r themâu hyn ymhellach.
  • HTC-2132: Rhyfel Mawr trwy lygaid y Cym. (20) (Semester 2)
    (Wythnos 1) Cyflwyniad Darlith 1 - Adrodd hanes y Rhyfel Sut mae’r ddealltwriaeth o’r Rhyfel Mawr wedi newid dros y degawdau Seminar 1 - Trafodaeth o sut mae’r myfyrwyr yn edrych ar y Rhyfel, a’r delweddau sydd yn gyfarwydd i’r Cymry; gwylio rhaglen Y Rhwyg (1988), a gyflwynwyd gan Dr John Davies (Wythnos 2) 1880-1914 Darlith 2 - Sôn am ryfel; poeni am ryfel; paratoi at ryfel; ysu am ryfel? Darlith 3 - Gorffennaf i Awst 1914 (Wythnos 3) Gwleidyddiaeth: Lloyd George, y Rhyddfrydwyr a’r Sosialwyr Darlith 4 - Cymeriad Lloyd George; Cyfraniad Lloyd George; Chwedl Lloyd George; Atgofion Lloyd George Darlith 5 - Sosialwyr a’r Rhyfel Seminar 2 – Gwleidyddiaeth a’r Rhyfel. Sut wnaeth gwleidyddion bortreadu’r Rhyfel, yn ystod yr ymladd ac yn y degawdau canlynol. (Wythnos 4) Her i’r hen syniadau am wareiddiad Darlith 6 - Gwrthwynebwyr Cydwybodol; Merched Cymru a’r Rhyfel Seminar 3 - Ymladd a gwrthod ymladd: agweddau Gwrthwynebwyr Cydwybodol, ac agweddau cymdeithas tuag at wrthwynebwyr cydwybodol (Wythnos 5) Ennill y Rhyfel; colli’r heddwch Darlith 7 – Buddugoliaeth Lloyd George? Cytundeb Versailles Darlith 8 – Dirwasgiad a Dadrithiad: y 1920au; Gwersi 1914 a’r ymgais i gymodi â Hitler: y 1930au (Wythnos 6) Yn sgil y Dadrithio Darlith 9 – Ymateb llenyddol yn y degawdau ar ôl 1918: chwedl Hedd Wyn; All Quiet on the Western Front Seminar 4 - David Davies a’r mudiad heddwch; Dyhuddiaeth a gwrthwynebiad i’r Ail Ryfel Byd (Wythnos 7) Y Llewod a’r Asynnod Darlith 10: Trafodaeth y 1960au: ‘Lions led by Donkeys’; pwysleisio ffolineb a gwastraff y rhyfel Seminar 5 – Gwylio darnau o gyfres The Great War (BBC, 1964) (Wythnos 8) Conundrum ‘y ddau Ffrynt Gorllewinol’ Darlith 11: Y gwahaniaeth rhwng maes y gad a fodolodd yn Ffrainc a Fflandrys rhwng 1914 a 1918 a’r un dychmygol sy’n gread y cenedlaethau a edrychai nôl mewn syndod a braw Seminar 6 – Cofeb Mametz; gwylio rhaglen Mametz (S4C, 1987) (Wythnos 9) Atgofion hen wŷr Darlith 12 - Trafferthion gydag atgofion cyn-filwyr, er gwaethaf eu hatyniad amlwg Darlith 13 – atgofion Griffith Williams, Bob Owen ac Ithel Davies (Wythnos 10) Hanes Diwylliannol y Rhyfel Darlith 14 - Rhoi’r cyfan mewn i gyd-destun diwylliannol Seminar 7 – Portreadu’r Rhyfel Mawr yn y Gymraeg heddiw: Lleisiau’r Rhyfel Mawr (2008) + Sesiwn ar gyfer cyflwyniadau’r myfyrwyr
  • HTH-2139: Norman Sicily (20) (Semester 1)
    1. Introduction - the creation of the kingdom, 1000-1130; 2. Roger II: the establishment of a new monarchy, 1130-1154; 3. Court culture and race relations; 4. Roger II's assizes: law and kingship; 5. Government in Sicily under the kings; 6. Reign of William I `the Bad', 1154-1166; 7. Reign of William II `the Good', 1166-1189; 8. The mosaics of the Norman kingdom¿Cefalu, Palermo and Monreale; 9. The church and the kings; 10. The chroniclers: Alexander of Telese and Hugh Falcandus. Students taking the course will study these topics using both primary sources (including the art produced in the kingdom) and the modern historiography.
  • HTH-2149: Britannia Rule the Waves (20) (Semester 2)
    (1) Introduction to the module, British Empire and Imperial Studies (2) Governing the Empire (3) British Policy and Trade (4) Technological Change (5) Scientific Exploration (6) The Empire: Asia (7) The Empire: America (8) The Empire: Africa (9) The Empire: Australasia (10) The British Empire and the Approach of War (11) Concluding lecture
  • HTH-2150: Britain in the Jazz Age (20) (Semester 2)
    1. War, Empire and Modernisation: The Boer War, WWI and an overview of the period. 2. Royalty and national identity: the Edwardian era; 1911 Investiture of the Prince of Wales; the Abdication Crisis. 3. Technological modernisation: Electricity, the wireless and motors. Case study of the Wembley Exhibition 4. Britain on the Breadline: health, living conditions and depression 5. Whippets, fish & chips and gambling: Workers, socialism and leisure 6. Nationalism and identity: Wales, Ireland and Scotland. 7. Ideology and the prelude to 1939 in Britain. A case study of Oswald Mosley and the British Union of Fascists. 8. Women in Love: Gender roles and fashion. A case study of the Mitford sisters 9. Bright Young People: Sexuality, aristocracy and decadence 10. Popular music: music halls, Jazz and Americanisation. 11. From bodyline bowling to mountaineering: Sport and society 1900-1939. 12. Workshop: Film and Jazz Age Britain 13. 1 day field trip to Manchester: Museum of Science and Industry and the People’s History Museum (including access to the Labour Party Archive)
  • HTC-2151: Gwladgarwyr a Gwladychwyr (20) (Semester 2)
    1. Cyflwyniad: trefedigaethau America yn yr Ymerodraeth Brydeinig 2. Radicaliaeth: Gweriniaethwyr a Cymedrolion 3. Cwrs y Rhyfel 4. Boston, Efrog Newydd a Virginia 5. Dynion Mawr: Washington, Jefferson 6. Y rhyfel mewn cyd-destun ehangach: Ffrainc a Phrydain 7. Creu gwladwriaeth: Datganiad Annibyniaeth; y Cyfansoddiad; Mesur Iawnderau 8. O’r tu allan: Americanwyr Cynhenid, Teyrngarwyr, Pobl Du a Menwod 9. Y Weriniaeth Gynnar 10. Effeithiau’r ‘Chwyldro’ a barnau cyfoes
  • HTC-2156: Rhyfel Cartref America (20) (Semester 1)
    Y Gogledd a’r De Gwleidyddiaeth yr 1850au Caethwasiaeth Achosion y Rhyfel a’r Argyfwng Arwahanu Ymladd y Rhyfel Abraham Lincoln Y Cymry a’r Rhyfel Y Rhyfel a’r Gorllewin Rhyddhau’r Caethweision Ennill y Rhyfel Adluniad a’i Fethiant
  • HTH-2157: The Age of the Castle (20) (Semester 1)
    This module explores the following themes: 1. Introduction: From the ‘Castle Story’ to Current Thinking; 2. The Origin of the Castle; 3. ‘The King of the Castle’: Great Towers and Keeps; 4. ‘An Englishman’s Home is his Castle’?: The Castle as Lordly Residence; 5. The Castles of the Crusaders 1098-1291; 6. Castles and the Chivalric Ideal; 7. The Castles of Wales 1066-1415; 8. Castles and Elite Landscapes; 9. The Decline of the Castle?; 10. Romantic Ruins? Artists, Poets and the Heritage Industry You will be given an opportunity to focus in-depth on these themes and on the underpinning primary sources in your seminars.
  • HTH-2159: History in Practice (20) (Semester 2)
  • HTH-2163: Nazi Germany 1933-1945 (20) (Semester 1)
  • HTH-2164: Violence in Early Mod Britain (20) (Semester 1)
  • Choose modules relevant to Archaeology. Students may take up to 60 credits in History over Levels 5 & 6.

Year 3 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • HDA-3075: Archaeology Dissertation (40) Core
    The report and dissertation will set the chosen research in its broader context e.g. historiography, theoretical framework, archaeological/geographical framework. It will set research questions and a structure will be worked out. It will describe and analyse the chosen topic using a range of relevant secondary and primary archaeological evidence. The project will be written up in an ordered and academic manner.
  • HTA-3118: Field Archaeology in Britain (20)
    Lectures 1. Course introduction: outline of course aims, content, assessment. 2. Research designs and regional sampling. 3. Desk-based research: (using HERs, literature searches (including grey literature), accessing aerial photographs, historical documents, place name research, map regression analysis). 4. Surveying upstanding monuments: building recording; setting up a site grid (EDM and tapes); surveying earthworks; fieldwalking strategies. 5. Geophysical surveys: magnetometer, resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, GPR 6. Setting up an archaeological excavation: SMCs, landowner permissions, logistics, sampling strategy, schedule. 7. Doing an excavation: excavation techniques: dryland, wetland, contexts 8. Doing an excavation: recording techniques (planning, section drawing, small finds) 9. Doing an excavation: sampling strategies (soil samples, dating samples) 10. Excavating human remains 11. Planning post-excavation analyses and presenting sites to the public: the importance of outreach Workshops 1. Interpreting aerial photography and geophysical surveys: formation processes, site and landscape stratigraphy, plotting data 2. Making maps (downloading data from Edina, Illustration, plotting data) 3. Designing an excavation strategy for three different case-study sites 4. Environmental soil sampling; sorting of soil residues (course residues) and presentation and analysis of data 5. Interpreting archaeological field illustrations (e.g. sections and plans); site formation processes and stratigraphy; writing stratigraphic reports Fieldtrips 1. Using the HER and grey literature searches: Gwynedd Archaeological Trust (2 hours) 1. Setting up a site grid and surveying upstanding remains (10 hours) 2. Building recording (5 hours)

Semester 2

  • HDA-3075: Archaeology Dissertation
    The report and dissertation will set the chosen research in its broader context e.g. historiography, theoretical framework, archaeological/geographical framework. It will set research questions and a structure will be worked out. It will describe and analyse the chosen topic using a range of relevant secondary and primary archaeological evidence. The project will be written up in an ordered and academic manner.

40 to 60 credits from:

  • HWA-3070: Archaeology Workplace Mod S1 (20) (Semester 1)
    The student normally spends one day a week during the appropriate semester, and in total about 70 hours, working in an archives office, an archaeological unit or a museum service undertaking specific tasks of a practical as well as an academic nature as given them by the officer(s) in charge. These typically include drawing up inventories, collating field evidence, drawing up catalogues of discrete manuscript or artefact collections, as well as at times dealing with public enquiries. Currently the Department has agreements with most of the archive record offices in north Wales, but especially at Caernarfon and Llangefni, with the Gwynedd Archaeological Trust, with Oriel Bangor and Oriel Môn at Llangefni and the regimental Museum at Caernarfon. Approved excavation training courses may qualify if of sufficient duration and rigour and conform to the Course Guidelines. Students should also be aware that there are health and safety implications to all placements.
  • HTA-3111: Ancestral Landscapes (20) (Semester 1)
    1. Introduction and the chronolgy of later prehistoric Britain and Ireland 2. Mesolithic background and the nature of hunter gatherers 3. The Mesolithic/ Neolithic transition 4. The environment, forest clearances and the role of cereals and meat in Neolithic diets 5. Settlements, houses and mobility 6. Neolithic material culture: pottery, stone tools, axes and flint mines 7. Places for the ancestors: the role of the dead in Neolithic society 8. Monuments 1: chambered tombs 9. Monuments 2: causewayed enclosures 10. Monuments 3: curses, henges and stone circles 11. Theory 1: Prehistoric landscapes, phenomenology and experience 12. Theory 2: The natural world: natural places and human animal relations 13. Ireland: a case study 14. Early Bronze Age: Introduction 15. Places for the dead: Earlier Bronze Age burial and ceremony 16. Early Bronze Age; elements of continuity, elements of change 17. Early Bronze Age/ Middle Bronze AGe transition 18. Dividing the land: Later Bronze Age Settlement 19. Later Bronze Age burial and ceremony 20. The production and consumption of prestige goods. 21. Regional archaeoloiges? 22. Revision session
  • HTA-3114: Experimental Archaeology (20) (Semester 2)
    1. Introduction: experimental archaeology today and its links with ethnoarchaeology 2. The history of experimental archaeology 3. Experiment by design: designing experiments, recording data and methodology 4. Prehistoric metallurgical practices: copper and bronze production 5. Stone and flint technologies; production and use-wear analysis 6. Prehistoric metallurgical practices: iron production 7. Food production: cooking with stone and food storage pits 8. Making prehistoric roundhouses 9. Cremation pyres: a case study on Early Bronze Age practices 10. Taphonomies: understanding the formation of the archaeological record through experimental archaeology 11. Experiencing experiments and materials; revision lecture
  • HTA-3117: Roman Frontier Society (20) (Semester 2)
    One of the key themes of this module is the interaction between the Roman army and native populations, and the subsequent evolution of distinct frontier societies. Contextualisation will be central to the investigation of the archaeology. Examination of material evidence from military and civilian sites will include settlement, burial and environmental evidence. Iconographic and epigraphic evidence will also be examined, as will contemporary written sources (e.g. the Vindolanda letters). Key issues explored will centre on continuity and change, and topics will include syncretism and native resistance. The history of Roman scholarship and its influence on perceptions of frontier life forms an important aspect of this course, with particular emphasis given to current post-colonial approaches.
  • HTA-3123: Supervising Archaeolog FieldWk (20) (Semester 1)
    Practical skills: Archaeological fieldwork supervision: maintaining records and taking responsibility for decisions as a supervisor or officer on an archaeological field project in the roles of context officer, drawing officer, photo officer, finds officer, sample officer, surveying officer, health and safety officer, trench supervisor, site visitor guide, deputy site director. Archaeological post-excavation supervision: taking responsibility for decisions as a supervisor or officer on an archaeological field project in the roles of environmental sample post-processing officer, finds post-processing officer, plan digitization officer, report writing officer. Theoretical knowledge: Principles of archaeological stratigraphy, GIS and CAD applications in archaeology, UK archaeological heritage legislation; organising and financing an excavation
  • Students on this programm must take the workplacement at Leve 6 if they did not take it at Level 5.

Optional Modules

0 to 40 credits from:

  • HGW-3003: Re-igniting the Dragon (20) (Semester 1)
  • HWA-3070: Archaeology Workplace Mod S1 (20) (Semester 1)
    The student normally spends one day a week during the appropriate semester, and in total about 70 hours, working in an archives office, an archaeological unit or a museum service undertaking specific tasks of a practical as well as an academic nature as given them by the officer(s) in charge. These typically include drawing up inventories, collating field evidence, drawing up catalogues of discrete manuscript or artefact collections, as well as at times dealing with public enquiries. Currently the Department has agreements with most of the archive record offices in north Wales, but especially at Caernarfon and Llangefni, with the Gwynedd Archaeological Trust, with Oriel Bangor and Oriel Môn at Llangefni and the regimental Museum at Caernarfon. Approved excavation training courses may qualify if of sufficient duration and rigour and conform to the Course Guidelines. Students should also be aware that there are health and safety implications to all placements.
  • HTA-3111: Ancestral Landscapes (20) (Semester 1)
    1. Introduction and the chronolgy of later prehistoric Britain and Ireland 2. Mesolithic background and the nature of hunter gatherers 3. The Mesolithic/ Neolithic transition 4. The environment, forest clearances and the role of cereals and meat in Neolithic diets 5. Settlements, houses and mobility 6. Neolithic material culture: pottery, stone tools, axes and flint mines 7. Places for the ancestors: the role of the dead in Neolithic society 8. Monuments 1: chambered tombs 9. Monuments 2: causewayed enclosures 10. Monuments 3: curses, henges and stone circles 11. Theory 1: Prehistoric landscapes, phenomenology and experience 12. Theory 2: The natural world: natural places and human animal relations 13. Ireland: a case study 14. Early Bronze Age: Introduction 15. Places for the dead: Earlier Bronze Age burial and ceremony 16. Early Bronze Age; elements of continuity, elements of change 17. Early Bronze Age/ Middle Bronze AGe transition 18. Dividing the land: Later Bronze Age Settlement 19. Later Bronze Age burial and ceremony 20. The production and consumption of prestige goods. 21. Regional archaeoloiges? 22. Revision session
  • HGH-3112: Civil War: Eng & Wal 1558-1660 (20) (Semester 1)
    The course concentrates upon political and religious history - but social, cultural, economic and intellectual aspects are also considered where they are relevant to the core of the course. Major topics explored include: The ‘crisis’ of the 1590s; The impact of the arrival of the Stuart dynasty; Divisions in English Protestantism; Charles I’s Personal Rule, and the outbreak of civil war; The course of the conflict, and attempts at a settlement; The reasons for the regicide; The English Republic and the restoration, 1649-1660
  • HTH-3112: Reformation & Counter-Reforma. (20) (Semester 2)
    The nature of the late medieval region; Luther's teaching; the early spread of the Reformation in town; the Peasants war; radical reformation and protestant divisions; the reformation in kingdoms and principalities; Calvinism and its association with revolt; the origins and nature of the counter-reformation; comparison of sixteenth century protestantism and catholicism.
  • HTA-3114: Experimental Archaeology (20) (Semester 2)
    1. Introduction: experimental archaeology today and its links with ethnoarchaeology 2. The history of experimental archaeology 3. Experiment by design: designing experiments, recording data and methodology 4. Prehistoric metallurgical practices: copper and bronze production 5. Stone and flint technologies; production and use-wear analysis 6. Prehistoric metallurgical practices: iron production 7. Food production: cooking with stone and food storage pits 8. Making prehistoric roundhouses 9. Cremation pyres: a case study on Early Bronze Age practices 10. Taphonomies: understanding the formation of the archaeological record through experimental archaeology 11. Experiencing experiments and materials; revision lecture
  • HTA-3117: Roman Frontier Society (20) (Semester 2)
    One of the key themes of this module is the interaction between the Roman army and native populations, and the subsequent evolution of distinct frontier societies. Contextualisation will be central to the investigation of the archaeology. Examination of material evidence from military and civilian sites will include settlement, burial and environmental evidence. Iconographic and epigraphic evidence will also be examined, as will contemporary written sources (e.g. the Vindolanda letters). Key issues explored will centre on continuity and change, and topics will include syncretism and native resistance. The history of Roman scholarship and its influence on perceptions of frontier life forms an important aspect of this course, with particular emphasis given to current post-colonial approaches.
  • HTA-3123: Supervising Archaeolog FieldWk (20) (Semester 1)
    Practical skills: Archaeological fieldwork supervision: maintaining records and taking responsibility for decisions as a supervisor or officer on an archaeological field project in the roles of context officer, drawing officer, photo officer, finds officer, sample officer, surveying officer, health and safety officer, trench supervisor, site visitor guide, deputy site director. Archaeological post-excavation supervision: taking responsibility for decisions as a supervisor or officer on an archaeological field project in the roles of environmental sample post-processing officer, finds post-processing officer, plan digitization officer, report writing officer. Theoretical knowledge: Principles of archaeological stratigraphy, GIS and CAD applications in archaeology, UK archaeological heritage legislation; organising and financing an excavation
  • HTH-3124: Heritage and Identity (20) (Semester 1)
    Individual, group, local, regional, national and global identities; museums; political and cultural role of archaeology and history, the heritage in minority groups, the heritage of elites, oral culture, heritage and the nation state, the creation of heritage-based identities in past societies
  • HGH-3127: Europe Early Middle Ages (20) (Semester 2)
    1. The fall of the western Roman empire; 2. The foundation of the `barbarian¿ kingdoms; 3. Merovingians and Carolingians; 4. Charlemagne; 5. The papacy and monasticism; 6. Justinian and the Byzantine revival; 7. Culture and society; 8. Towns and economy; 9. The Vikings and the foundation of Normandy; 10. The creation of the caliphate of Cordoba. Students taking the course will study these topics using both primary sources (such as Gregory of Tours, Paul the Deacon, Einhard¿s Life of Charlemagne) and the modern historiography.
  • HTW-3127: Wales, Renaissance & Europe (20) (Semester 2)
  • HTC-3132: Rhyfel Mawr trwy lygaid y Cym. (20) (Semester 2)
    (Wythnos 1) Cyflwyniad Darlith 1 - Adrodd hanes y Rhyfel Sut mae’r ddealltwriaeth o’r Rhyfel Mawr wedi newid dros y degawdau Seminar 1 - Trafodaeth o sut mae’r myfyrwyr yn edrych ar y Rhyfel; Dadansoddi delweddau poblogaidd o'r rhyfel ar y teledu, gan roi sylw arbennig i raglen Y Rhwyg (1988), a gyflwynwyd gan Dr John Davies (Wythnos 2) 1880-1914 Darlith 2 - Sôn am ryfel; poeni am ryfel; paratoi at ryfel; ysu am ryfel? Darlith 3 - Gorffennaf i Awst 1914 (Wythnos 3) Gwleidyddiaeth: Lloyd George, y Rhyddfrydwyr a’r Sosialwyr Darlith 4 - Cymeriad Lloyd George; Cyfraniad Lloyd George; Chwedl Lloyd George; Atgofion Lloyd George Darlith 5 - Sosialwyr a’r Rhyfel (Wythnos 4) Her i’r hen syniadau am wareiddiad Darlith 6 - Gwrthwynebwyr Cydwybodol; Merched Cymru a’r Rhyfel Seminar 2 - Ymladd a gwrthod ymladd: Sosialwyr a’r Rhyfel / Gwrthwynebwyr Cydwybodol. Dadansoddi’r disgrifiadau a gafwyd yn y wasg o’r rhai a wrthwynebodd y Rhyfel (Wythnos 5) Ennill y Rhyfel; colli’r heddwch Darlith 7 – Buddugoliaeth Lloyd George? Cytundeb Versailles Darlith 8 – Dirwasgiad a Dadrithiad: y 1920au; Gwersi 1914 a’r ymgais i gymodi â Hitler: y 1930au (Wythnos 6) Yn sgil y Dadrithio Darlith 9 – Ymateb llenyddol yn y degawdau ar ôl 1918: chwedl Hedd Wyn; All Quiet on the Western Front Seminar 3 – Dadansoddi agweddau gwleidyddion Cymreig a Phrydeinig (gan gynnwys David Davies) tuag at yr ymgyrch heddwch yn y degawdau rhwng y rhyfeloedd; dadansoddi’r gwrthwynebiad a welwyd yng Nghymru i’r Ail Ryfel Byd, a’i gymharu â dadleuon y rhai a gefnogai’r ymgyrch (Wythnos 7) Y Llewod a’r Asynnod Darlith 10: Trafodaeth y 1960au: ‘Lions led by Donkeys’; pwysleisio ffolineb a gwastraff y rhyfel Seminar 4 – Dadansoddi cynnwys a phwysigrwydd cyfres fawr The Great War (BBC, 1964) (Wythnos 8) Conundrum ‘y ddau Ffrynt Gorllewinol’ Darlith 11: Y gwahaniaeth rhwng maes y gad a fodolodd yn Ffrainc a Fflandrys rhwng 1914 a 1918 a’r un dychmygol sy’n gread y cenedlaethau a edrychai nôl mewn syndod a braw Seminar 5 – Trafod yr amrywiol ffyrdd y mae’r Cymry wedi coffâu brwydr Mametz; dadansoddi rhaglen Mametz (S4C, 1987) (Wythnos 9) Atgofion hen wŷr Darlith 12 - Trafferthion gydag atgofion cyn-filwyr, er gwaethaf eu hatyniad amlwg Seminar 6 – Dadansoddi atgofion y cyn-filwyr Griffith Williams, Bob Owen a’r gwrthwynebydd cydwybodol Ithel Davies, a thrafod eu dilysrwydd (Wythnos 10) Hanes Diwylliannol y Rhyfel Darlith 13 - Rhoi’r cyfan mewn i gyd-destun diwylliannol Seminar 7 – Dadansoddi’r modd y portreadir y Rhyfel Mawr yn y Gymraeg heddiw, gan astudio cyfres Lleisiau’r Rhyfel Mawr (S4C, 2008) + Sesiwn ar gyfer cyflwyniadau’r myfyrwyr
  • HTH-3139: Norman Sicily (20) (Semester 1)
    1. Introduction - the creation of the kingdom, 1000-1130; 2. Roger II: the establishment of a new monarchy, 1130-1154; 3. Court culture and race relations; 4. Roger II¿s assizes: law and kingship; 5. Government in Sicily under the kings; 6. Reign of William I `the Bad¿, 1154-1166; 7. Reign of William II 'the Good', 1166-1189; 8. The mosaics of the Norman kingdom - Cefalu, Palermo and Monreale; 9. The church and the kings; 10. The chroniclers: Alexander of Telese and Hugh Falcandus. Students taking the course will study these topics using both primary sources (including the art produced in the kingdom) and the modern historiography.
  • HTH-3149: Britannia Rule the Waves (20) (Semester 2)
    (1) Introduction to the module, British Empire and Imperial Studies (2) Governing the Empire (3) British Policy and Trade (4) Technological Change (5) Scientific Exploration (6) The Empire: Asia (7) The Empire: America (8) The Empire: Africa (9) The Empire: Australasia (10) The British Empire and the Approach of War (11) Concluding lecture
  • HTH-3150: Britain in the Jazz Age (20) (Semester 2)
    1. War, Empire and Modernisation: The Boer War, WWI and an overview of the period. 2. Royalty and national identity: the Edwardian era; 1911 Investiture of the Prince of Wales; the Abdication Crisis. 3. Technological modernisation: Electricity, the wireless and motors. Case study of the Wembley Exhibition 4. Britain on the Breadline: health, living conditions and depression 5. Whippets, fish & chips and gambling: Workers, socialism and leisure 6. Nationalism and identity: Wales, Ireland and Scotland. 7. Ideology and the prelude to 1939 in Britain. A case study of Oswald Mosley and the British Union of Fascists. 8. Women in Love: Gender roles and fashion. A case study of the Mitford sisters 9. Bright Young People: Sexuality, aristocracy and decadence 10. Popular music: music halls, Jazz and Americanisation. 11. From bodyline bowling to mountaineering: Sport and society 1900-1939. 12. Workshop: Film and Jazz Age Britain 13. 1 day field trip to Manchester: Museum of Science and Industry and the People’s History Museum (including access to the Labour Party Archive)
  • HTC-3151: Gwladgarwyr a Gwladychwyr (20) (Semester 2)
    1. Cyflwyniad: trefedigaethau America yn yr Ymerodraeth Brydeinig 2. Radicaliaeth: Gweriniaethwyr a Cymedrolion 3. Cwrs y Rhyfel 4. Boston, Efrog Newydd a Virginia 5. Dynion Mawr: Washington, Jefferson 6. Y rhyfel mewn cyd-destun ehangach: Ffrainc a Phrydain 7. Creu gwladwriaeth: Datganiad Annibyniaeth; y Cyfansoddiad; Mesur Iawnderau 8. O’r tu allan: Americanwyr Cynhenid, Teyrngarwyr, Pobl Du a Menwod 9. Y Weriniaeth Gynnar 10. Effeithiau’r ‘Chwyldro’ a barnau cyfoes
  • HTC-3156: Rhyfel Cartref America (20) (Semester 1)
    Y Gogledd a’r De Gwleidyddiaeth yr 1850au Caethwasiaeth Achosion y Rhyfel a’r Argyfwng Arwahanu Ymladd y Rhyfel Abraham Lincoln Y Cymry a’r Rhyfel Y Rhyfel a’r Gorllewin Rhyddhau’r Caethweision Ennill y Rhyfel Adluniad a’i Fethiant
  • HTH-3157: The Age of the Castle (20) (Semester 1)
  • HTH-3163: Nazi Germany 1933-1945 (20) (Semester 1)
  • Students may take up to 60 credits in History over Levels 5 & 6.