Modules for course WQ93 | BA/CSTEL
BA Creative Stds & English Lang.

These were the modules for this course in the 2017–18 academic year.

You can also view the modules offered in the years: 2018–19; 2019–20.

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Year 1 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • QXL-1110: Introduction to Language (20) Core
    The course provides an overview of a wide range of topics in the study of natural language, including: 1. What is language? 2. Morphology: words and their structure. 3. Phonetics and Phonology: language sounds and sound systems. 4. Syntax: sentence structure 5. Semantics and Pragmatics: meaning and context 6. Language variation. 7. Language change. 8. Language acquisition 9. Language pathologies 10. Language and the brain Furthermore, the course provides guidance on how to plan & write an essay as well as other assessment methods, and on how to prepare effectively for examinations.

Optional Modules

60 credits from:

  • UXS-1001: Intro to Practical Journalism (20) (Semester 1)
    The Basics of Writing a News Story; How to write Intros, Drop Intros, Lively Intros; What makes a good news story?; Where do stories come from?; How to build a contacts book; How to conduct an interview; Writing for TV and Radio; Colour and Feature Writing; An Introduction to Shorthand; How to deal with breaking news.
    or
    UXC-1001: Cyfl. i Newyddiaduraeth Ymarf. (20) (Semester 1)
    Hanfodion ysgrifennu straeon newyddion; Sut i ysgrifennu Intros, Drop Intros, ac Intros Bywiog; Beth sy’n gwneud stori dda?; O le mae straeon yn dod?; Sut i greu llyfr contacts; Sut i gynnal cyfweliad; Ysgrifennu ar gyfer teledu a radio; Ysgrifennu erthyglau nodwedd; Cyflwyniad i llawfer; Ymdopi â newyddion sy’n torri.
  • UXS-1004: History of Journal & Pub Sph. (20) (Semester 2)
    This course starts by presenting and critiquing Jurgen Habermas’ ideal of the public sphere. It then examines the various forces that he suggests constitute the public sphere’s corruption – namely the forces of propaganda, public relations, interest groups, neo-liberalism and market pressures. Taking a range of analytical perspectives (critical-theoretical, historical, political-economic and sociological) the rise of market-driven journalism will be examined, as will journalism’s struggle to establish its independence from the state and the state’s consequent attempts at manipulation and censorship. Throughout, a range of journalistic ideals, forms and practices, such as the radical press, objective journalism and investigative journalism, will be critically analysed and evaluated.
  • UXS-1017: Writing Across Media (20) (Semester 1)
    In "Creating Narratives" you will have the opportunity to investigate, and participate in, a variety of creative activites relating to the production of fiction. You will be able to develop an awareness of issues connected with the writing and consumption of fiction (e.g.creative, cultural and technological issues), and discover how cultural norms and assumptions, and individually writerly actions, influence fiction writing choice and fiction readerships. You will look at contemporary fiction writing around the world in a variety of media, and consider the role of publishers and readers in the creative process.
  • UXS-1024: Introduction to Screenwriting (20) (Semester 2)
    This module is an introduction to the basic underlying principles of screenwriting. It introduces students to key features of writing for film, and assesses them on their analyses of the screenplay form, plus the writing of a screenplay and treatment, and the pitching of an original concept. Students will primarily focus on writing for the short film format in order to facilitate their assessed short film screenplay assignment. Lectures will deliver various aspects of screenwriting, broken down week-by-week so that students can digest specific aspects of the craft of screenwriting. These include script formatting, style, structure, genre, plotting, characterisation and dialogue. Students will also learn how to present their work in the form of industry treatments and outlines, as well as techniques for outlining a concept orally, in the form of a film pitch. Students will be encouraged to develop professional writing habits and to give and receive critically constructive comment and advice. Seminar time will be spent discussing aspects of screenwriting, screened short films, as well as providing an opportunity for students to carry out creative screenwriting tasks in groups. Students will also be encouraged to critically peer evaluate the work of their cohort, and to analyse published screenplays, applying knowledge gained in the lecture. Students will also be required to read portions of screenplay extracts from published work prior to the seminars and lectures (uploaded to Blackboard) in order to analyse them during the seminars.
  • UXS-1055: Digital Communication (20) (Semester 1)
    The module looks includes a study of information theory in which students engage models for understanding concepts that include data, pattern, similarity of differences, information, structure, design, and communication. Students also explore the history and technology of the internet and the web, the communication models that have grown from them, and the relationship between these channels and the production, delivery, sharing and sale of information. The model includes a practical element in which students work with various software tools to engage with tools and technologies for information design/presentation; this includes background to the main types of information software available and some of the principles that inform them.
    or
    UXB-1055: Cyfathrebu Digidol (20) (Semester 1)
    Mae myfyrwyr yn ymgysylltu â modelau ar gyfer deall cysyniadau sy'n cynnwys data, patrwm, tebygrwydd o wahaniaethau, gwybodaeth, strwythur, dylunio, a chyfathrebu. Myfyrwyr yn archwilio hanes a thechnoleg y rhyngrwyd a'r we, y modelau cyfathrebu sydd wedi tyfu oddi wrthynt, a'r berthynas rhwng y sianelau a chynhyrchu, cyflwyno, rhannu a gwerthu gwybodaeth. Mae'r modiwl yn cynnwys elfen ymarferol y myfyrwyr yn ymgysylltu ag offer a thechnolegau gwybodaeth am ddylunio / cyflwyniad. Mae hyn yn cynnwys cefndir y prif fathau o feddalwedd gwybodaeth sydd ar gael a'r egwyddorion sy'n llywio eu dyluniad. The module looks includes a study of information theory in which students engage models for understanding concepts that include data, pattern, similarity of differences, information, structure, design, and communication. Students also explore the history and technology of the internet and the web, the communication models that have grown from them, and the relationship between these channels and the production, delivery, sharing and sale of information. The model includes a practical element in which students work with various software tools to engage with tools and technologies for information design/presentation; this includes background to the main types of information software available and some of the principles that inform them.
  • UXS-1062: Film Language (20) (Semester 2)
    This module provides students with a toolkit for the analysis of the moving image and aims to provide students with a technical vocabulary to enable them to analyse and to discuss how films communicate meaning. The individual elements of this toolkit are analysed in detail. Lectures cover topics such as: Mise-en-Scene, Editing, Camerawork, Sound, Lighting, and Style. Weekly screenings illustrate relevant aspects of film form. Films to be screened may include: A Man Escaped (Bresson, 1956), The Innocents (Clayton, 1961), City of God (Meirelles, 2002), Atonement (Wright, 2007), Bourne Ultimatum (Greengrass, 2007). The Red Shoes (Powell & Pressburger, 1948), and Moulin Rouge! (Luhrman, 2001)
    or
    UXC-1062: Iaith y Ffilm (20) (Semester 2)
    Mae'r cwrs hwn yn fodd o alluogi myfyrwyr i ddysgu hanfodion dadansoddi'r ddelwedd symydol. Bydd myfyrwyr ar y cwrs yn dysgu terminoleg dechnegol a fydd yn eu cynorthwyo i ddadansoddi a dehongli y modd y mae ffilm yn cyfathrebu ystyr. Bydd darlithoedd unigol yn trafod pynciau megis Mise-en-Scene, Montage, Gwaith Camera, Sain, Goleuo ac Arddull Weledol. Bydd dangosiadau o ffilmiau perthnasol yn cael eu cynnal yn wythnosol, er mwyn cyflwyno engrheifftiau o'r pynciau dan sylw. Bydd y ffilmiau a ddangosir yn cynnwys: A Man Escaped (Bresson, 1956), The Innocents (Clayton, 1961), City of God (Meirelles, 2002), Atonement (Wright, 2007), Bourne Ultimatum (Greengrass, 2007). The Red Shoes (Powell & Pressburger, 1948), ac Moulin Rouge! (Luhrman, 2001)
  • UXS-1063: Film History (20) (Semester 1)
    This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the link between film technologies, narratives, styles, genres, and subjects, and the societies in which film circulates. Lectures will introduce students to a range of important changes which have influenced the development of the filmic medium. The course will help students to situate the selected films in their cultural, , generic, and technological context. Lectures cover topics such as: Genre (Western, Screwball Comedy, Sport, Epic...), Narrative structure, Early Cinematic Milestones, The Introduction of Sound, Classical Hollywood Studio System, Asian Post-War Cinema, Italian Neo-Realism. Weekly screenings illustrate issues covered in lectures and associated readings, and will provide a case study for weekly workshops. Films/shorts to be screened may include: Le Voyage dans la Lune (Méliès, 1902), Man with a Movie Camera (Vertov, 1929), M (Lang, 1931), Blackmail (Hitchcock, 1929), Der Blaue Engel (Von Sternberg, 1930), Citizen Kane (Welles, 1941), Roma, Città Aperta (Rossellini, 1945), Rashomon (Kurosawa, 1950), Ladri di Biciclette (De Sica, 1948), À bout de soufflé (Godard, 1960), Memento (Nolan, 2000), There Will Be Blood (Anderson, 2007).
  • UXS-1065: Film Criticism (20) (Semester 1)
  • UXS-1066: American Television Drama (20) (Semester 2)
  • UXS-1090: Media Culture (20) (Semester 2)
    Media Culture focuses on media developments paying attention to traditional media forms such as film, TV, radio and print media and on to digital media forms. The essence of this module is to consider the impact of media on society and the ways in which they have altered or affected society. This requires us to consider: how media affect that way we live, how we as people interact and communicate, what we make, how we experience places, and more broadly how changes in media positively and negatively make a difference in the world. More formally, this module addresses: affordances of a range of media forms, interrelationships between technology and society, political economy, identity and community, production, dissemination and ownership, communication and interaction, privacy, and the ideological implications of networked mediated culture in a co-creative media age.
    or
    UXB-1043: Diwylliant y Cyfryngau (20) (Semester 2)
  • UXB-1120: Theatre Making (20) (Semester 1)
    What is performance? What are all the elements involved in a performance? The historical and cultural legacy of selected theatre traditions. How selected theatre traditions challenged and enhanced the notion of performance and the theatre.
    or
    UXS-1120: Theatre Making (20) (Semester 1)
    What is performance? What are all the elements involved in a performance? The historical and cultural legacy of selected theatre traditions. How selected theatre traditions challenged and enhanced the notion of performance and the theatre.
  • UXB-1403: Performing for Stage & Screen (20) (Semester 2)
    • Introduction to the key techniques and methods used for performing for the stage and screen • Exploring the psychological, physical and vocal understanding of actor’s training • Investigating the historical and cultural legacy of selected performing traditions.
    or
    UXS-1403: Performing for Stage & Screen (20) (Semester 2)
  • UXS-1800: Game Studies (20) (Semester 1)
  • UXS-1801: Game Design 1 (20) (Semester 2)

40 credits from:

  • QXL-1113: Language and Society (20) (Semester 1)
    Sociolinguistic variability means that people use language in various different ways, depending on their social background and the current situation they are in. We will consider this phenomenon using three interrelated perspectives of studying variability: • Linguistic variables: Which aspects of the English language are variable? • Social (and regional) variables: How do speakers differ & which social aspects lead to using the English language in different ways? • Situational variables: When do speakers use which variants of English? Along these lines, the basic terminology used in this field will be introduced and employed for discussion, and empirical insights gained by sociolinguists will be examined critically.
    or
    QCB-1113: Iaith a Chymdeithas (20) (Semester 1)
  • QXL-1115: Intro to Phonetics & Phonology (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    This class is an introduction to the phonetics of spoken languages, covering articulatory phonetics, acoustics, and introductory phonology. Areas covered include: anatomy of the vocal tract and terminology used to describe speech articulators, articulatory phonetics, with an emphasis on the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) and how to use it to transcribe speech, an introduction to acoustic theory as it relates to speech sounds, the nature of phonological patterns (alternation and phonotactics), melody and prosody, and the structural representation of speakers’ phonological knowledge. The knowledge and skills acquired here will be essential for many other modules and/or projects.
  • QXL-1116: Introduction to Meaning (20) (Semester 2)
    1. Introduction: What is semantics? Meaning - communication and significance. The semiotic triangle: mind language world and meaning. Lexemes. Sense / reference / denotation / connotation. 2. Semantics: Meaning - Word meaning and sentence meaning. Literal versus non literal. Utterance, sentences and propositions. Semantics and pragmatics 3. Meaning, Thought & Reality - Reference: types. Mental representations: concepts, necessary and sufficient conditions, prototypes, and relations between concepts. Linguistic Relativity. Thought & Reality. 4. Semantic Description - Words and grammatical categories. Words and lexical items, Lexical relations (homonymy, polysemy, synonymy, antonymy, hyponymy, meronymy) 5. Sentence Relations and Truth - Logic and truth, Necessary Truth, A Priori truth and Analyticity, Entailment and Presupposition. 6. Pragmatics: Making sense of each other linguistically - Context and Structure 7. Speech Act Theory & the Cooperative Principle 8. Politeness Theories 9. Critical Discourse Analysis 10. Intercultural Pragmatics
  • QXL-1117: Intro to Morphology & Syntax (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The module will be split between the study of syntax and the study or morphology in the ration 60:40. 1. Morphemes: the parts of a word. 2. Types of affix and affix ordering 3. The productivity of affixation. 4. Word-formation without affixes. 5. Compounding 6. Syntactic classification: Parts of Speech and functional relations. 7. Syntactic structure and Immediate Constituent Analysis. 8. Recursion and the generation of syntactic structure. 9. Heads and their dependents 10. Syntactic relations within the sentence. 11. Relations between sentence types.
  • QCL-1145: Disgrifio'r Gymraeg (20) (Semester 2)
    • Rhannau ymadrodd y Gymraeg • Cystrawen a threfn geiriol sylfaenol y Gymraeg • Morffoleg sylfaenol y Gymraeg • Ffonoleg a seineg (h.y. sain) sylfaenol y Gymraeg a sut i drawsgrifio’r Gymraeg gan ddefnyddio’r IPA • Disgrifio Cymraeg ffurfiol o safbwynt ieithyddol • Cyflwyniad i ddisgrifio tafodieithoedd y Gymraeg mewn modd ieithyddol • Dylanwad y Saesneg ac ieithoedd eraill ar y Gymraeg (e.e. benthyg, ymyrraeth) • Cymharu’r Gymraeg ag ieithoedd lleiafrifol eraill • Dyfodol y Gymraeg o safbwynt gramadegol

Year 2 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • QXL-2222: History of English (20) Core
    1. Studying the History of English. 2. The Sounds and Writing of English 3. Causes and Mechanisms of Language Change. 4. The Indo-European Language Family and Proto-Indo European. 5. Germanic and the Development of English. 6. The Sounds and Words of Old English. 7. The Grammar of Old English. 8. The Rise of Middle English: Words and Sounds 9. The Grammar of Middle English and the Rise of a Written Standard. 10. The Sounds and Inflections of Early Modern English. 11. Early Modern English Verbal Constructions and Eighteenth-Century Prescriptivism. 12. Modern English.

Optional Modules

60 credits from:

  • UXS-2025: Stanley Kubrick: Auteur (20) (Semester 1)
    Topics that will be covered in this module include all of Kubrick’s films, as well as how these intersect with events such as World War One, the Holocaust, the Cold War and the Vietnam War and such issues as science, technology, history, race, violence, gender, ethnicity, sexuality and war.
  • UXS-2033: Practical Digital Journalism (20) (Semester 2)
    The course will begin with an introduction to on-line journalism, the influence of new digital technology on journalism and its implications for traditional forms of media. We will also discuss the ethical and legal issues involved in producing on-line content. You will be taught a range of skills including how gather news on-line, write and produce visual and audio content for digital news platforms and how to ensure that content reaches a wide audience. You will be expected to put these skills into practice and create your own digital news platform, create content from that platform and distribute that content to the widest possible audience.
  • UXS-2038: Journalism and Risk (20) (Semester 1)
    This course starts by presenting and critiquing the concept of risk, and the development of the field of risk communication. It then examines two key theorists of the 'risk society', namely Ulrich Beck and Anthony Giddens, to explore sociological theoretical foundations that explain inter-relationships of risk, trust, expertise and mass-mediated communication. Building on this theoretical lens, it then moves to examine journalism, risk and trust, looking at patterns of risk reporting in different aspects of the press. In-depth analysis of specific risk issues and their journalistic communication are examined, ranging from health risks like 'mad cow' disease to security risks like terrorism.
  • UXS-2041: Games and Virtual Environments (20) (Semester 2)
    In 'Games and Virtual Environments' you will investigate the lively contemporary field of computer/video games and virtual worlds. During the module you will define, discuss and analyse various types of games and virtual environments. You will investigate issues surrounding games narrative and ludology (the theory and philosophy of gaming) as well as look at various video game genres (e.g. 1st person shooters, adventures, civilisation and god games; online, platform and massively multiplayer games). You will also examine the social and psychological effects of playing computer games and learn to evaluate realistically the implications of game consumption with respect to education and entertainment. By the end of this module, you will have developed a broad theoretical and critical background to the analysis of games and virtual environments, and you will be familiar with empirical research methods used to evaluate consumer needs and behaviour.
  • UXS-2050: Race & Gender (20) (Semester 2)
    Topics to be looked at will include, Senegalese Cinema, representing prostitution, women in photography, race and gender in performance art, representing women on film, women and genre, Women and horror, women and action, Australian Visual Culture, Aboriginal female film makers, remembering the slave trade, post-colonialism, neo-colonialism and representation, how we define ‘white’.
  • UXS-2052: Radio: Theory and Practice (20) (Semester 1)
    The lectures will initially focus on the history of radio as a specific medium, with a particular focus on Wales and the UK, as well as a broader international perspective. Different radio production methods will then be examined, and subsequently different programme genres, with specific examples being studied. The theoretical aspects of the module culminate in a broad conceptual review of the nature of the medium and how this is changing in the digital age. The practical workshops will run concurrently, with the students revising and developing generic production skills at the beginning of the course, before planning, researching and producing their own individual productions. These will be informed by the study of production methods, genres and programmes introduced in the lectures.
    or
    UXC-2052: Radio Theori ac Ymarfer (20) (Semester 1)
    Bydd y darlithoedd yn canolbwyntio yn gyntaf ar hanes radio fel cyfrwng penodol, gyda sylw arbennig i Gymru a’r Deyrnas Unedig, yn ogystal â phersbectif rhyngwladol ehangach. Nesaf, fe archwilir amryw o ddulliau cynhyrchu radio, ac yna gwahanol fathau o raglenni radio, gan ddadansoddi enghreifftiau penodol. Bydd agweddau damcaniaethol y modiwl yn cael eu crynhoi yn derfynol gydag arolwg cysyniadol eang o natur y cyfrwng a sut mae hyn yn newid yn yr oes ddigidol. Bydd y gweithdai ymarferol yn cyd-redeg â’r darlithoedd, gyda’r myfyrwyr yn datblygu eu sgiliau cynhyrchu cyffredinol cyn iddynt gynllunio, ymchwilio a chreu cynyrchiadau unigol. Bydd yr astudiaeth o ddulliau cynhyrchu, mathau o raglenni a rhaglenni penodol yn y darlithoedd o gymorth i’r myfyrwyr gyda’r gwaith ymarferol.
  • UXS-2055: Privacy and the Media (20) (Semester 1)
    Week 1 – Introduction: why privacy matters Week 2 – Philosophical/theoretical contexts Week 3 – Journalism Week 3 – Telecommunications, transparency and the Snowden leaks Week 4 – Behavioural advertising Week 5 – Big data and sentiment analysis Week 6 – The direction of Google, search and personal assistants Week 7 – Social media Week 8 – Gaming and biometric media Week 9 – Wearable media Week 10 – Telekinetic media and Google Glass Week 11 – Wrap-up: what do media developments tell us about privacy?
  • UXS-2058: Writing for Film & Television (20) (Semester 2)
    This module is designed to develop knowledge and skills in writing for film, and introduces key stylistic and textual characteristics of writing for television. The module provides an overview of television writing, separated into television drama and the situation comedy, and outlines the specific demands of these formats for screenwriters. Students are then assessed on their own original television concept in the form of a treatment and screenplay extract, plus a short critical and reflective essay. The course then goes on to present advanced theories of writing for film - developing concepts of characterisation, structure, genre, visual storytelling and the use of dialogue and action. Students will be encouraged to engage with formal screenwriting concepts such as the three-act structure, genre tropes, active protagonists and plot resolutions. However, they will also be expected to interrogate and challenge these elements of screenwriting craft, and are expected to display this engagement in their assessed work. Students will be assessed on their own original film concept in the form of a treatment and screenplay extract (for a short film or feature film), plus a critical and reflective essay. Lectures will deliver various features of writing for television and film, using screenings as contextual support material. Lectures will initially present some basic concepts of screenwriting such as script formatting, style, structure, genre, plotting, characterisation and dialogue, before moving on to deal specifically with television drama, situation comedy, the short film and the feature film. Seminar time will be spent discussing various aspects of screenwriting outlined in the lectures. Students will be encouraged to engage with, and challenge, elements of the craft of screenwriting, and to carry out creative screenwriting tasks in groups. Students will also critically peer evaluate the work of their cohort, and analyse published screenplays, applying knowledge gained in the lectures. Students will be required to develop professional writing habits and to give and receive critically constructive comment and advice. Proposed films and television programmes to be screened include: The Sopranos (Chase, 1999-2007), The Wire (Simon, 2002-08), Red Riding (Jarrold, 2009), The Singing Detective (Potter, 1986), The Prisoner (McGoohan, 1967-68), Oz (Fontana, 1997-2003), Twin Peaks (Frost/Lynch, 1990-91), The IT Crowd (Linehan, 2006- ), Spaced (Wright, 1999-2001), The Office (Gervais/Merchant, 2001-3), Father Ted (Linehan, 1995-8). The Third Man (Reed, 1949), Brief Encounter (Lean, 1945), The Devil¿s Backbone (Del Toro, 2001), Intacto (Fresnadillo, 2001), Hunger (McQueen, 2008), Dead Man's Shoes (Meadows, 2004), The Sea Inside (Amenábar, 2004), The White Ribbon (Haneke, 2009), Festen (Vinterberg, 1998), Uzak (Ceylan, 2002), Sympathy for Mr Vengeance (Park, 2002), Let the Right One In (Alfredson, 2008), The Road (Hillcoat, 2009), Sexy Beast (Glazer, 2000), No Country for Old Men (Coen, 2007)
  • UXS-2059: Understanding Documentary (20) (Semester 1)
    This course will look at the development of documentary film, attempting to place important developments within a theoretical context. The course will begin by looking at the way in which the early pioneers of documentary film emerged in the 1920s, and seek to understand the contributions of John Grierson, Robert Flaherty and Dziga Vertov, and the relationship between their work. This will be followed by an examination of the emergence of Direct Cinema and Cinema Verité during the 1960s, and the challenges faced by those attempting to work within observational documentary. The rejection of the purely observational mode of documentary, and the rise of the participatory film-maker will follow, leading on to an examination of reflexive documentaries, the role of dramatisation within documentary film, drama-documentary and docudrama. The final part of the course will look at the influence of new technology upon documentary film, analysing the influence of both computer generated imagery and animation upon documentary film. Specific attention will be paid to the work of film-makers such as Albert and David Maysles, DA Pennebaker, Nick Broomfield, Molly Dineen, Errol Morris, and Kevin MacDonald among others.
    or
    UXC-2046: Y Ffilm ddogfen:Theori (20) (Semester 1)
    Bydd y cwrs hwn yn edrych ar ddatblygiad ffilmiau dogfen gan geisio gosod datblygiadau pwysig mewn cyd-destun damcaniaethol. Caiff hanes y ffilm ddogfen ei drafod yng nghyd-destun y cwestiynnau syniadaethol a ddilynodd o esblygiad gwahanol fathau o ffilmiau dogfen. Bydd myfyrwyr ar y cwrs yn edrych ar amrediad o ffilmiau, o'r 1920au hyd heddiw, ond bydd mwyafrif y ffilmiau a fydd yn cael eu harchwilio yn rhai cyfoes. Bydd gofyn i'r myfyrwyr ddadansoddi'r ffilmiau, gan gyfeirio at theori dogfen wedi ei ysgrifennu gan amrywiaeth o awduron, gan gynnwys: John Grierson, Dziga Vertov, Paul Rotha, Bill Nichols, Stella Bruzzi, John Corner, a Paul Wells, ymhlith eraill.
  • UXS-2062: Film Distribution & Marketing (20) (Semester 1)
  • UXS-2064: Film Theory (20) (Semester 2)
  • UXS-2076: Global News Agenda (20) (Semester 2)
    Topics that this module will discuss include: the CNN effect; manipulating global news agendas through public diplomacy; war, perception management and bearing witness through global media forms; reporting distant suffering; satellite news wars; the rise of satellite news in the Middle East and the possible rise of an Arab public sphere; and the impact of global news forms on censorship and resistance.
  • UXS-2078: Writing Genre Fiction (20) (Semester 2)
    Students will approach genre fiction from a creative & critical perspective, examining a particular genre across the semester as a series of case studies (e.g., speculative fiction). They will engage in reading and analyzing relevant texts, applying theory and understanding gained to their own creative project.
  • UXS-2099: Research and Methods (20) (Semester 2)
    Introduction; choosing a research topic Writing a research proposal Research Paradigms: Positivism vs Interpretivism Working with texts 1: Textual analysis Working with texts 2: Content analysis Fieldwork 1: Questionnaires, interviews and focus groups Fieldwork 2: Ethnography and participant observation Case study approaches Quantitative and qualitative sampling issues Research Ethics Doing a literature review; writing a dissertation
  • UXS-2400: Contemporary Theatre Practice (20) (Semester 2) or
    UXB-2400: Contemporary Theatre Practice (20) (Semester 2)
    Introduce theoretical and practical research in Contemporary Theatre Practice Explore advance theatre making methods to create original creative work Practice Workshop delivery and how to evaluate practice
  • UXS-2401: Practical Journalism: ELD (20) (Semester 1)
    The course will teach students media law and how to report on the workings of government. They will gain practical experience in reporting from courts, inquests and council meetings. They will also be taught how to write and research news and feature articles, interviewing techniques, and how to cover running stories and elections.
    or
    UXC-2401: Newyddiaduraeth Ymarferol: MCD (20) (Semester 1)
    Bydd y modiwl yn dysgu myfyrwyr am gyfraith y cyfryngau a sut i ohebu am brosesau'r llywodraeth. Byddant yn cael profiad ymarferol o ohebu am achosion llys, cwestau a chyfarfodydd cyngor. Byddant hefyd yn dysgu sut i ymchwilio ac ysgrifennu erthyglau newyddion ac erthyglau nodwedd, technegau cyfweld a sut i ymdrin â straeon parhaol ac etholiadau.
  • UXB-2408: Site Specific Performance (20) (Semester 1)
    Introduction to site specific performances, conventions and performance practice Exploring performance in a non-theatre building environment The historical and cultural legacy of selected performing traditions.
    or
    UXS-2408: Site Specific Performance (20) (Semester 1)
    Introduction to site specific performances, conventions and performance practice Exploring performance in a non-theatre building environment The historical and cultural legacy of selected performing traditions.
  • UXS-2412: Playable Fiction (20) (Semester 2)
    The creative writer is constantly challenged by the evolution of literary form, striving to create fresh and original narratives that depart from the conventional. Modernism, postmodernism, and now digital media are all avenues of exploration and experimentation. This module focuses on the latter domain, as writers approach narrative through the creation of games. Story-games, such as hypertexts, interactive fictions, and visual novels, necessitate unconventional, and even unnatural, structures and perspectives. By creating playable narratives, students on this course will open their writing up to new expressions, forms, and genres. Students will discuss and explore critical and creative responses to these texts, applying new techniques and awareness to their creative writing practice.

40 credits from:

  • QXL-2201: Sounds and Sound Systems (20) (Semester 2)
    1. articulatory phonetics, 2. spectrographic analysis, 3. the interaction of melody and prosody, 4. the nature of phonological rules, 5. the structural representation of speakers’ phonological knowledge.
  • QXL-2202: Meaning, Mind and Truth (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    1) Language, meaning and mind 2) Universals and Variation in Language, Thought & Experience 3) Embodiment and Conceptual structure 4) Encyclopaedic Semantics 5) Metaphor 6) Metonymy 7) Word meaning and radial categories 8) Mental Spaces and Compositional Semantics 9) Conceptual Blending 10) The semantic basis of grammar
  • QXL-2204: Morphosyntax (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    This module provides an intermediate level framework in which to both study and apply key ideas, terms and concepts on the fields of morphology and syntax. There are two goals for this course. The first goal is to introduce students to more advanced ideas and principles central to the study of both morphology and syntax. The second goal is to provide students with the tools to apply the terms and principles to data / problem sets from a range of languages in order to conduct morphological and /or syntactical analysis. The lectures will provide students with the “big picture”, i.e. central ideas are summarized, important terms and principles defined and theoretical implications outlined. In the tutorials, students discuss key elements in detail and reflect on theoretical implications and apply the knowledge gained to cross linguistic examples and/or data sets. The following are representative topics: 1: Review: Introduction, word structure, types of morphemes. 2: Productivity, Inflectional morphology 3: Morphological mappings of grammatical function 4: Grammatical relations 5: Dependency relations 6: Constituent structure 7: Theories of syntax
  • QCL-2245: Ieithyddiaeth Gymraeg (20) (Semester 1)
    • Orthograffeg (sillafu) y Gymraeg • Agweddau canolradd o ffonoleg a seineg y Gymraeg • Agweddau canolradd o gystrawen y Gymraeg • Agweddau canolradd o forffoleg y Gymraeg • Agweddau canolradd o eirfa’r Gymraeg • Treiglo yn y Gymraeg • Agweddau canolradd o dafodieithoedd y Gymraeg • Creu ac astudio corpysau ieithyddol Cymraeg • Y Gymraeg yn y gymdeithas heddiw (e.e. ar y We, teledu) • Symud iaith, newid iaith a marwolaeth iaith o safbwynt gramadegol
  • QXL-2250: Functions of Discourse (20) (Semester 2)
    In the first part of this module we will focus on the theory of Systemic Functional Grammar (SFG) so as to grasp its basic mechanisms, and identify the main lexicogrammatical structures that are available to speakers of English. The second part will be dedicated to issues around discourse and context. We will look at theories and findings based on SFG, and analyse instances of discourse, exploiting theory to gain insights about the meaning and significance of specific linguistic choices for the discourse area they appear in. Along with theory and analysis, we will consider implications for English language education. Whilst lectures will provide the theoretical and conceptual foundations of SFG and SFG based discourse analysis, the tutorials will be used for discussion, case presentations, and exercises as appropriate for each week's topic. The following topics will be covered: 1. Introduction: SFG and its purposes 2. SFG theory: Clause as message – the textual function 3. SFG theory: Clause as exchange – the interpersonal function 4. SFG theory: Clause as representation – the ideational function 5. SFG theory: Above and below the clause 6. SFG theory: Around the clause – cohesion and discourse 7. Interpreting discourse: Approaches and findings using SFG tools 8. Working with discourse: Appraisal 9. Working with discourse: Ideation 10. Working with discourse: Conjunction and identification 11. Interpreting discourse at different levels of proficiency
  • QCL-2271: Amrywiaeth yn y Gymraeg (20) (Semester 2)
    • Tafodieitheg a thafodieithoedd y Gymraeg • William Labov a theori sosioieithyddiaeth amrywiaethol • Newidynnau annibynnol ieithyddol (e.e. oedran, rhyw, grŵp cymdeithasol) • Amrywiaeth yng ngwahanol rannau o ramadeg y Gymraeg (e.e. ffonoleg, geirfa, morffoleg, cystrawen, cyfnewid cod, treiglo) • Theori ac astudiaethau o newid iaith yn y cyd-destun Cymraeg a thu hwnt • Cymraeg hanesyddol (e.e. Cymraeg Canol) • Hanfodion casglu data sosioieithyddol • Hanfodion dadansoddi data sosioieithyddol (gan gynnwys sesiynau ymarferol)

Year 3 Modules

Optional Modules

60 credits from:

  • UXS-3025: Stanley Kubrick: Auteur (20) (Semester 1)
    The enigmatic Stanley Kubrick was one of the most well-known filmmakers of the twentieth century. Although not prolific, his work was widely admired both by critics and mass audiences. Kubrick's films also provide a prism through which we can view the major events of the twentieth century including World War One, the Holocaust, the Cold War and the Vietnam War. In doing so, his films provide an opportunity to explore the key themes of science, technology, history, race, violence, gender, ethnicity, sexuality and war. Teaching is by means of a two-hour seminar per week. In addition, students are required to organise small-group viewing of designated films per week.
  • UXS-3036: E-Publishing (20) (Semester 2)
    In `E-Publishing' you will have the opportunity to investigate the nature of electronic publishing and electronically published materials, looking at the range, type and style of e-published materials (eg. websites, blogs, podcasts, streamed video and audio, e-books). You will be able to develop an awareness of issues connected with e-publishing (ie. Textual, creative, cultural and technological issues), and discover how cultural norms and assumptions influence e-publishing choice and readership. You will look at global versus national or regional forms of electronic publishing and e-publishing genre. This module will include some master-classes/workshops from the realms of e-publishing.
  • UXS-3038: Journalism and Risk (20) (Semester 1)
    This course starts by presenting and critiquing the concept of risk, and the development of the field of risk communication. It then examines two key theorists of the 'risk society', namely Ulrich Beck and Anthony Giddens, to explore sociological theoretical foundations that explain inter-relationships of risk, trust, expertise and mass-mediated communication. Building on this theoretical lens, it then moves to examine journalism, risk and trust, looking at patterns of risk reporting in different aspects of the press. In-depth analysis of specific risk issues and their journalistic communication are examined, ranging from health risks like 'mad cow' disease to security risks like terrorism.
  • UXS-3041: Games and Virtual Environments (20) (Semester 2)
    In `Advanced Games', you will plot out a project relating to a new product for the computer game industry. This will involve some sense of market profiling and potential, and a discussion of where your particular product might be used. In class, you will discuss and evaluate aspects of game design. By the conclusion of the module you will have researched, outlined and illustrated your product, provided a detailed creative blueprint for its shape and form, and shown an awareness of how it contributes to, or advances, the chosen genre.
  • UXS-3049: Advanced Screenwriting (20) (Semester 1)
    Lectures will deliver various discourses on the history and development of adaptations, and interrogate the relationship of various media to film. Lectures will also examine a range of concepts related to adaptation, including authorship, visual storytelling, narratology and intertextuality. These concepts will then be applied to film adaptations screened in the same week. Seminar time will be spent discussing theories of adaptation, and also provide an opportunity for students to carry out creative adaptation tasks in groups, such as conceiving short film ideas, and developing adaptations from non-literary sources, such as music and photography, and other visual arts. Students will need to demonstrate an understanding of key theories related to the comparative textual analysis of an adaptation to its source material in assessed essays. However, the module is heavily focused on the creative act and process of adaptation, and offers the chance for students to radically imagine pre-existing texts in other media in their assessed coursework. Proposed films to be screened include: Adaptation (Jonze, 2002), Throne of Blood (Kurosawa, 1957), American Psycho (Harron, 2000), The Innocents (Clayton, 1961), The Others (Amenábar, 2001), The Watchmen (Snyder, 2009), Don't Look Now (Roeg, 1973), The Shining (Kubrick, 1980), Apocalypse Now (Coppola, 1979), Stalker (Tarkovsky, 1979), Zatoichi (Kitano, 2003), Where the Wild Things Are (Jonze, 2009), La Jetée (Marker, 1962), 12 Monkeys (Gilliam, 1995), Naked Lunch (Cronenberg, 1991), A Cock & Bull Story (Winterbottom, 2005), Elephant (Clarke, 1989), Elephant (Van Sant, 2003), The Five Obstructions (Leth/Von Trier, 2003).
  • UXS-3050: Race & Gender (20) (Semester 2)
    Topics to be looked at will include, Senegalese Cinema, women in photography, race and gender in performance art, representing women on film, women and genre, Women and horror, women and action, Australian Visual Culture, Aboriginal female film makers, remembering the slave trade, post-colonialism, neo-colonialism and representation, how we define `white'.
  • UXS-3055: Privacy and the Media (20) (Semester 1)
    Week 1 – Introduction: why privacy matters Week 2 – Philosophical/theoretical contexts Week 3 – Journalism Week 3 – Telecommunications, transparency and the Snowden leaks Week 4 – Behavioural advertising Week 5 – Big data and sentiment analysis Week 6 – The direction of Google, search and personal assistants Week 7 – Social media Week 8 – Gaming and biometric media Week 9 – Wearable media Week 10 – Telekinetic media and Google Glass Week 11 – Wrap-up: what do media developments tell us about privacy?
  • UXS-3062: Film Distribution & Marketing (20) (Semester 1)
  • UXS-3076: Global News Agenda (20) (Semester 2)
    Topics that this module will discuss include: the CNN effect; manipulating global news agendas through public diplomacy; war, perception management and bearing witness through global media forms; reporting distant suffering; satellite news wars; the rise of satellite news in the Middle East and the possible rise of an Arab public sphere; and the impact of global news forms on censorship and resistance.
  • UXS-3078: Writing Genre Fiction (20) (Semester 2)
    Students will approach genre fiction from a creative & critical perspective, examining a particular genre across the semester as a series of case studies (e.g., speculative fiction). They will engage in reading and analyzing relevant texts, applying theory and understanding gained to their own creative project.
  • UXS-3090: Dissertation (40) (Semester 1 + 2)
    This module is a period of supervised research culminating in the submission of a 10,000-word dissertation worth 40 credits. In week six students will make a 10 minute oral presentation on the progress of their research to date. Students wishing to produce a piece of practice-based audio-visual research (e.g. a fiction or non-fiction television, film or radio piece) must normally register for UXS 3091 (Final Year Group Project), although there is opportunity to employ creative methodologies so for practice-based students to utilise their learning and skills in a research context.
    or
    UXC-3090: Ast'th Unigol neu Draethawd (40) (Semester 1 + 2)
    Mae'r modiwl hwn yn datblygu ar yr hyn a astudiwyd yn y modiwl UXS 2092 yn yr ail flwyddyn. Cyfnod o ymchwil dan oruchwyliaeth fydd yn arwain at gyflwyno traethawd hir 10,000 o eiriau gwerth 40 credyd yw'r modiwl hwn. Yn wythnos 6, bydd gofyn i fyfyrwyr roi cyflwyniad llafar 10 munud ar hynt eu hymchwil hyd yma. Fel rheol, dylai myfyrwyr sydd eisiau gwneud ymchwil clyweledol yn seiliedig ar ymarfer (e.e. darn teledu, ffilm neu radio ffuglen neu ffeithiol) gofrestru ar UXS 3091 (project grŵp blwyddyn olaf) yn lle’r modiwl hwn, er bod cyfle i ddefnyddio methodolegau creadigol er mwyn i fyfyrwyr ar gyrsiau sy'n seiliedig ar ymarfer allu defnyddio eu dysgu a'u sgiliau mewn cyd-destun ymchwil. Ni ellir cymryd y modiwl hwn gyda UXS 3090. Mae'n rhaid ichi fod wedi astudio UXS 2099 NEU UXS 2092 er mwyn dilyn y modiwl hwn.
  • UXS-3092: Dissertation - Action Research (40) (Semester 1 + 2)
  • UXB-3400: Contemporary Theatre Practice (20) (Semester 2)
    Introduce theoretical and practical research in Contemporary Theatre Practice Explore advance theatre making methods to create original creative work Practice Workshop delivery and how to evaluate practice
    or
    UXS-3400: Contemporary Theatre Practice (20) (Semester 2)
  • UXC-3401: Newyddiaduraeth Ymarferol: MCD (20) (Semester 1)
    Bydd y modiwl yn dysgu myfyrwyr am gyfraith y cyfryngau a sut i ohebu am brosesau'r llywodraeth. Byddant yn cael profiad ymarferol o ohebu am achosion llys, cwestau a chyfarfodydd cyngor. Byddant hefyd yn dysgu sut i ymchwilio ac ysgrifennu erthyglau newyddion ac erthyglau nodwedd, technegau cyfweld a sut i ymdrin â straeon parhaol ac etholiadau.
    or
    UXS-3401: Practical Journalism: ELD (20) (Semester 1)
    The course will teach students media law and how to report on the workings of government. They will gain practical experience in reporting from courts, inquests and council meetings. They will also be taught how to write and research news and feature articles, interviewing techniques, and how to cover running stories and elections.
  • UXB-3408: Site-Specific Performance (20) (Semester 1)
    Introduction to site specific performances, conventions and performance practice Exploring performance in a non-theatre building environment The historical and cultural legacy of selected performing traditions.
    or
    UXS-3408: Site-Specific Performance (20) (Semester 1)
    Introduction to site specific performances, conventions and performance practice Exploring performance in a non-theatre building environment The historical and cultural legacy of selected performing traditions.
  • UXS-3412: Playable Fiction (20) (Semester 2)
    The creative writer is constantly challenged by the evolution of literary form, striving to create fresh and original narratives that depart from the conventional. Modernism, postmodernism, and now digital media are all avenues of exploration and experimentation. This module focuses on the latter domain, as writers approach narrative through the creation of games. Story-games, such as hypertexts, interactive fictions, and visual novels, necessitate unconventional, and even unnatural, structures and perspectives. By creating playable narratives, students on this course will open their writing up to new expressions, forms, and genres. Students will discuss and explore critical and creative responses to these texts, applying new techniques and awareness to their creative writing practice.

60 credits from:

  • QXL-3313: EFL Theory (20) (Semester 1)
    This module provides an overview of TEFL theory by examining a wide range of contexts in which language teaching and learning takes place. Topics will include the following: 1. The use of English within a global context. 2. Language awareness in the classroom. 3. English teaching methodologies. 4. Analysis of teaching English to speakers of other languages based on research articles and DVD material: affective factors and classroom interaction. 5. Implementing and evaluating curriculum change.
  • QXL-3320: SLA and Language Teaching (20) (Semester 2)
    The topics covered in this module would be the following: 1. Background to SLA Research 2. Individual differences in L2 users and L2 learners 3. L1 transfer: Code-switching and Second Language Learning 4. Theories of L2 acquisition 5. The role of age in L2 acquisition 6. The goals of language teaching and assessment 7. The L2 user and the native speaker 8. Embedding SLA research into Language teaching
  • QXL-3329: Teaching EFL (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    This module provides an introduction to the teaching of EFL through practice and theory and by examining a range of contexts in which English language teaching and learning takes place. Topics will include the following: 1. The nature of EFL teaching contexts. 2. Methodologies employed in the EFL classroom. 3. The role of the teacher of EFL. 4. Strategies used teaching vocabulary, grammar, writing, speaking, reading & listening. 5. Factors affecting lesson planning and materials choice/design. 6. Reflective practice – evaluating teaching and lesson aims.
  • QXL-3335: Bilingual & Acquisition Issues (20) (Semester 1)
    Topics will change from year to year and may include: 1. Bilingual social interaction 2. Bilingual first language acquisition 3. Second language acquisition 4. Multilingualism 5. Issues of identity 6. The bilingual brain
  • QXL-3336: Phonology in Bilingual Acq. (20) (Semester 1)
    This module provides an overview of how simultaneous bilinguals develop knowledge of the sound systems of their two languages and how that knowledge is represented in their minds. There are three goals for this course. The first goal is to introduce students to key findings and central debates in research on bilingual acquisition of phonology. The second goal is to provide students with the tools to critically examine the existing literature, particularly with regard to explaining phenomena in bilingual phonology through theory development and evaluation. The third goal is to equip the students with the ability to appropriately frame narrow research hypotheses in view of well-known phenomena and to apply this ability to their own research. The lectures will present and discuss specific issues from current research (mostly from research articles) while also outlining open questions on the topic. In the seminars, students discuss key studies in more detail and reflect on methodologies, results and theoretical implications. The topics will include: 1. Introduction to the acquisition of phonology in bilinguals 2. Phonological organisation in bilinguals 3. Transfer effects in phonology 4. Acceleration effects in phonology 5. The acquisition of melody and segmental content in bilinguals. 6. Phonotactic effects in bilingual acquisition 7. The bilingual acquisition of prosodic patterns.
  • QXL-3341: Dissertation (40) (Semester 1 + 2)
    Topics vary depending on individual students choices, and the emphasis is on individual study. However, they relate to a wide array of issues in linguistics and/or English Language studies. However, classes will include: • How to formulate a research question • Producing a research proposal • Research methodologies • Statistics
    or
    QCB-3341: Traethawd Hir/Dissertation (40) (Semester 1 + 2)
    Topics vary depending on individual students’ choices. However, they relate to a wide array of issues in linguistics and/or English Language studies.
  • QCL-3370: Agweddau ar Ddwyieithrwydd (20) (Semester 1)
    • Cymru a’r Gymraeg yn y cyd-destun dwyieithog • Diffinio dwyieithrwydd • Dwyieithrwydd unigol vs. dwyieithrwydd cymdeithasol • Caffael iaith mewn cyd-destun dwyieithog • Addysg ddwyieithog yng Nghymru a thu hwnt • Polisïau iaith yn y cyd-destun dwyieithog Cymreig • Cyfnewid côd o safbwynt cymdeithasol a gramadegol • Agweddau seicoieithyddol o ddwyieithrwydd • Agweddau pobl ar ddwyieithrwydd ac ieithoedd lleiafrifol • Newid iaith, marwolaeth iaith a dyfodol y Gymraeg
  • QXL-3376: Cognitive Discourse Analysis (20) (Semester 1)
    The module will start by considering what kinds of thoughts, concepts, and cognitive processes can be accessed through language, and then discuss each step of a research process that involves verbalisation of thought: from identifying a suitable research question via data collection and transcription to analysis, interpretation, and triangulation with other kinds of data. The main emphasis will lie on the systematic analysis of linguistic choices, aiming to identify indicators for specific cognitive phenomena that are of interest for the research purpose at hand. In this process, insights from the wider field of cognitive linguistics highlight the significance of specific linguistic choices. While lectures will provide the theoretical and conceptual foundations needed for doing CODA, the tutorials will be used for discussion and exercises as appropriate for each step of the analysis procedure. The following topics will be covered: 1. Introduction: CODA and its purposes 2. Scientific background I: Cognitive Linguistics 3. Scientific background II: Cognitive Psychology 4. Research questions for CODA 5. Data collection techniques and data preparation (transcription and unitisation) 6. Content analysis 7. Resources for linguistic analysis I: Cognitive Linguistics 8. Resources for linguistic analysis II: Functional grammar and discourse structure analysis techniques 9. Linguistic feature analysis I: Mental representations 10. Linguistic feature analysis II: Problem solving processes 11. Interpreting results and establishing relations to other findings
  • QXL-3377: Using Corpora: Theory&Practice (20) (Semester 2)
    This module introduces students to the theoretical and practical issues of using corpora in linguistic studies and helps them to develop the background, knowledge and skills needed in order to develop and utilize a corpus based approach in their own research projects. The goals of this module are two-fold. First the students will be introduced and become familiar with the technical aspects of course based approaches and research. Then, attention will be directed to looking at how corpora and corpuses based approaches are used in a range of linguistic and language oriented studies. The lectures will provide students with the “big picture”, i.e. different research domains will be explored, central topics are summarized, important studies discussed and open questions outlined. In the tutorials, students discuss key studies in detail and reflect on methodologies, results and implications. The following topics will be covered: 1. Introducing corpus linguistics, corpus design, types of corpora and corpus annotation 2. Corpus analysis: concordance, wordlist, keyword analysis 3. Integrating stats and making statistic claims 4. Corpora in grammatical studies 5. Corpora in diachronic studies 6. Metaphor and Corpus Linguistics (A. Deignan) 7. Corpus Approaches to Critical Metaphor Analysis (J. Charteris-Black) 8. Corpora in critical discourse analysis (C. Hart) 9. Corpora language variation research 10. Corpora in sociolinguistic studies 11. Corpora in language education - focus on TEFL.