Dr Maureen McCue

Dr Maureen McCue
Name
Dr Maureen McCue
Position
Lecturer
Email
m.mccue@bangor.ac.uk
Phone
01248 382122
Location
Room 302, New Arts

I joined the School of English in 2013.  Originally from San Francisco, I completed my BA at the University of Montana, before earning my MPhil and PhD at the University of Glasgow. My research examines the literature and culture of the long nineteenth century in Britain, particularly the ways in which British authors harnessed Italian cultural markers in order to engage with contemporary social and political issues at home.

Academic Responsibilities

  • International Officer

  • Personal tutor for International students

  • Personal tutor for Joint honours students

Teaching and Supervision

Undergraduate

Year One:

  • QXE1006 Exploring America (Convenor)
  • QXE1010 Approaches to Literature A

  • QXE1011 Approaches to Literature B

  • QXE1005 Travellers’ Tales

Year Two:

  • QXE2012 Reason to Romanticism

  • QXE2005 Victorian Literature

Year Three:

  • QXE3099 Dissertation

  • QXE3051 Brits & Yanks abroad in Italy (Convenor)

Postgraduate

  • QXE4015 Introduction to Literary Theory, Scholarship and Research

Supervision

I am particularly interested in supervising postgraduate research on Romantic-period visual culture and any aspect of the cultural relationship between Britain and Italy in the long nineteenth century.

Research

  • Anglo-Italian relationships in the long nineteenth century

  • Romantic-period print and visual culture

  • Reception studies

  • William Hazlitt’s art criticism and aesthetic philosophy

  • Construction of nation and identity

Ongoing research projects

My first book British Romanticism and the Reception of Italian Old Master Art, 1793- 1840, based on my doctoral research, is under contract at Ashgate (due July 2013). It argues that the Romantic experience of Italian Old Master art was a key element in the period’s aesthetics and print culture, informing everything from poetics to book bindings. While the Victorian engagement with this art is well known, my book posits that the impact of such paintings on British culture is better understood through examining the ways in which they shaped the imaginative and material aspects of print culture from the 1790s through the 1830s. This interdisciplinary study examines how the Romantics created a new vocabulary for art and literature and, in doing so, made it possible for new reader-viewers to forge new social, national and transnational identities for themselves.

My next project, Romantic Republics: Medieval Tuscany in the Romantic Imagination, 1785-1845 , examines the ways in which the cultural geography of Tuscany offered British Romantic writers a space in which to pursue the possibilities of liberal politics and the imagination. Romantic Republics investigates how such writers focused on Italian political and literary figures, urban spaces and the relationship between artistic patronage and mercantile wealth, to construct a politically innovative and culturally vibrant Medieval Tuscany that offered a dynamic template for contemporary Britain. In writing this historiography of Tuscany, the Romantics were particularly concerned with the 13-15th centuries, yet they also forged connections between figures such as Dante, Machiavelli and Michelangelo. Central to this study will be the popular genres of biography, such as Roscoe’s Life of Lorenzo il Magnifico, and the historical novel, especially Mary Shelley’s Valperga.

Selected Publications

Book

  • British Romanticism and the Reception of Italian Old Master Art, 1793- 1840. Under contract at Ashgate Publishing (due July 2013).

Peer-Reviewed Articles

  • ‘Reverse Pygmalionism: Art and Samuel Rogers’s Italy’, in Romantic Textualities: Literature and Print Culture, 1780-1840.  (Forthcoming, 2013)
  • A Gallery in the Mind’: Hazlitt, the Louvre, and the Meritocracy of Taste’, in The Hazlitt Review, 1 (2008), pp. 51- 62.

Selected Conference Activity

Panels Organized

  • ‘Place, Identity and Nation in Romantic Britain and Italy’, British Association of Romantic Studies: Enlightenment, Romanticism and Nation, University of Glasgow, 28-31 July 2011

Papers Presented

  • ‘Prints and Profits: Samuel Rogers’ Italy and its Gothic tales’, Gothic: Culture, Subculture, Counterculture, St Mary’s University College Twickenham London, 8-9 March 2013
  • ‘British Identity, Italian Art’, British Association of Romantic Studies: Enlightenment, Romanticism and Nation, University of Glasgow, 28-31 July 2011
  • ‘Reverse Pygmalionism: Art and Samuel Rogers’s Italy’, Romantic Visual Cultures, Cardiff University, 17 April 2009
  • ‘Hazlitt and the Bologna School of Painting’, North American Society for the Study of Romanticism and Centro Interdisciplinare di Studi Romantici: (Trans)national Identities – Re-Imagining Communities, University of Bologna, Italy, 12-15 March 2008
  • ‘Byron, Hawthorne, and Anglo-American Aesthetic Tourism’, Byron Society of America: Byron and America panel, Modern Languages Association Convention, Chicago, IL, USA, 27-29 December 2007
  • ‘“The Goddess Loves in Stone”: Byron, Shelley and Aesthetic Debate’, International Byron Society: Byron and Identity, Venice International University and Ca’Foscari University of Venice, Italy, 9-13 July 2007

Awards and Grants

  • Modern Languages Association Postgraduate Travel Grant (2011)
  • Postgraduate Award, Department of English Literature, University of Glasgow  (2009)
  • Graduate School of Arts and Humanities Research Award, University of Glasgow (2008)
  • Postgraduate Award, Department of English Literature, University of Glasgow (2008)
  • Stephen Copley Postgraduate Bursary, British Association for Romantic Studies (2007)
  • Postgraduate Award, Department of English Literature, University of Glasgow (2007)
  • Postgraduate Award, Department of English Literature, University of Glasgow (2006)
  • Walter N. King Memorial Scholarship, University of Montana (2003)

Languages

  • Italian (Strong reading, writing and speaking ability)

Professional Membership

  • Modern Languages Association (MLA)
  • British Association for Romantic Studies