News: February 2018

St Gerard’s School are Top of the Bench!

A team from St Gerard’s School in Bangor are this year’s north Wales heat winners of the Top of the Bench competition run by Bangor University’s School of Chemistry.

Publication date: 26 February 2018

Hummit, the new app released by a Bangor University student

We’ve all had that tune in our heads that we can’t name.  Well, Joey Elliott, aged 22 from Oswestry,  has developed a mobile app to resolve that problem!  His app lets users find the names for those annoying tunes in their head such as the title of a catchy song heard on the radio and then later, you cannot remember. Joey created the idea after he found himself having this recurring problem and is hoping to help others in similar situations.

Publication date: 23 February 2018

National bursaries for Bangor's engineering talent

Three students from Bangor University have received Engineering Horizons Bursaries from the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET). The bursaries are awarded to students who are passionate about engineering and have taken up a place on an engineering or technology degree course which has been accredited by the IET.

Publication date: 21 February 2018

Finding new ways to identify and treat the most challenging brain cancers

A large European research collaboration is bringing new technology to bear to combat two of the most aggressive brain cancers.

The research project combines the expertise of leading biologists and electronic engineers to develop innovative microtechnology devices that will ultimately be able to identify and treat Glioblastoma multiforme and Medulloblastoma cancer stem cells.

Publication date: 19 February 2018

Starfish can see in the dark (among other amazing abilities)

If you go down to the shore today, you’re sure of a big surprise. Many will have witnessed the presence of a starfish or two when visiting the seashore or a public aquarium. Starfish come in an exciting range of colours and sizes, but have you ever given a thought to how this multi-armed wonder manages to exist in our oceans when it’s so unlike the other animals we know?

This article by Coleen Suckling, Lecturer in Marine Biology, at the School of Ocean Sciences was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 16 February 2018

Reviewing bioenergy resources for construction and other non-energy uses

Bangor University’s BioComposites Centre (BC) has been selected to lead a consortium to deliver a review on ‘The potential for using bioenergy resources for construction and other non-energy uses’ for the Committee on Climate Change (CCC), a non-governmental advisory body. This review will feed into the updated Bioenergy Review 2018, which will be published by the CCC in the autumn.

Publication date: 8 February 2018

Student work to contribute to challenging sepsis

Rates of sepsis are on the increase. This rare but serious complication which can happen as a result of an infection can be life- threatening.

One chemistry student is hoping that her research work will contribute to the fight against this infection.

Publication date: 8 February 2018

Five ingenious ways snakes manipulate their bodies to hunt and survive

Do a quick search for “snakes” in the news and you’ll find people terrified, bitten or, sadly, killed by these creatures. Many of us fear their slithering ways and researchers have found evidence which suggests that humans have evolved a tendency to spot snakes more easily than other animals.

But there are more than 3,500 species of snake in the world, and they have been around for 167m years – so they must be doing something right.

This article by Tom Major, PhD candidate in Biological Sciences, Bangor University  was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 7 February 2018

Bangor University supporting beaver reintroductions for World Wetlands Day

Bangor University has thrown its support behind the reintroduction of beavers in Wales to mark World Wetlands Day (2.2.18).

Scientists from the university are calling for more support of the Welsh Beaver Project which aims to bring back the iconic animal to the country.

Publication date: 2 February 2018

DNA pinpoints river animals in the here-and-now

New research proves that environmental DNA survives for less than two days in small fast-flowing rivers and so provides highly localised and current information on species composition.  This is crucial new evidence as biologists turn increasingly to new DNA sampling techniques to assess aquatic ecosystem health.

Publication date: 2 February 2018