News: January 2019

Prestigious early career award goes to PhD student

A Bangor University PhD student is the first female to be awarded an international prize for her outstanding work in the field of marine sedimentology.

Megan Baker was awarded the International Association of Sedimentologists RICHARD W. FAAS RESEARCH PRIZE and a cash award of €2000. The Faas prize is awarded every two years to an early career researcher. This is also the first time that this prize has been awarded to a PhD student.

Publication date: 30 January 2019

Inspirational Bangor University tutor wins national tutor award

A Bangor University lecturer who reminds her students to phone their families has won a national award.

Human Geography lecturer Siân Pierce, who says she finds people “endlessly fascinating”, has picked up an Inspire! Tutor Award after watching thousands of her students graduate in her more than 20 years.

The awards celebrate the achievements of exceptional tutors and mentors in Wales who have shown outstanding passion and commitment to encourage, support and teach other adult learners to pursue their goals and transform their lives, whether it’s in their community or the workplace.

Publication date: 25 January 2019

Bangor University scientist receives honorary doctorate from Chilean university

Dr Shaun Russell, Director of Bangor University’s Treborth Botanic Garden, was awarded a ‘doctor honoris causa’ at a ceremony at the Universidad de Magallanes (UMAG)  recently.

UMAG is located in the city of Punta Arenas on the Straits of Magellan in southern Chile. Dr Russell has been conducting botanical research work in the region for the past 16 years. Tierra del Fuego is a global diversity hotspot for mosses and liverworts, which are classed as bryophytes and Dr Russell’s work on these small but ecologically important plants, contributed directly to the creation of the UNESCO “Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve” there in 2005.

Publication date: 24 January 2019

Year of the Sea Lecture Series now available online Watch your favourite lecture again, or catch up with those you missed

The School of Ocean Sciences marked the 2018 Year of the Sea with a special series of lectures hosted by the Mostyn Gallery in Llandudno.

Publication date: 21 January 2019

Investigating why oak trees are dying is helping scientists understand how infectious diseases work

British oak trees are under threat from a disease known as Acute Oak Decline. Mainly affecting mature trees, it can kill them within four to five years of symptoms appearing. However, while researchers like myself have been looking into what causes it, and trying to find a way to prevent it, our work has been hindered in part by the fact that we have to follow a set of scientific rules known as Koch’s postulates.

This article by James Doonan, Postdoctoral Research Officer, School of Natural Sciences is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 14 January 2019

Bangor University Venom Day attracts world-leading experts

Toxin enthusiasts from around the globe gathered in North Wales for an annual event organised by Bangor University students.

Leading academics, world experts and a TV star joined over a hundred people for the unique Venom Day conference in Bangor to discuss toxicology and venomous species.

Publication date: 10 January 2019

Why foraging for free is food for the soul

 In the past few years, there’s been a resurgence in the idea of foraging for food. The practice of hand gathering plants and animals for bait, money or the table has long taken place, but more recently top chefs have been popularising the idea, while urban foragers have told of the lengths they go to to find wild food in big cities.

This article by PhD candidate at the School of Ocean SciencesElisabeth S. Morris-Webb, is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 10 January 2019

“For services to tackling poverty abroad and to education in Derby”

Dr Daljit Singh Virk, a Senior Research Fellow at Bangor University is to receive the OBE.

The award recognises the impact of Dr Virk’s scientific contributions as geneticist and plant breeder as well as his leading role in establishing the Sikh faith Akaal Primary School, in Derby in 2015. The free school was established under the Academies Act.

Dr Virk has been at the heart of one of Bangor University’s most impactful research projects, which has contributed to improved food security and livelihoods for millions of households in some of the most impoverished countries.

Publication date: 8 January 2019