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Funding to develop dementia researchers

In Wales there at 45,000 people living with dementia and the cost of illness has been estimated at £1.4 billion per year. The highest part of this cost is unpaid care by family and friends. Support services can be fragmented and difficult for people to access across health and social care sectors. Poor transport links and the risk of carers feeling more isolated and unsupported are particular challenges for rural areas.

Researchers at Bangor University’s School of Healthcare Sciences have been awarded over half a million pounds in funding to undertake fellowships in dementia research. These fellowships, funded by Welsh Government through Health and Care Research Wales, aim to build capacity in health and social care research by supporting individuals to become independent researchers and to undertake high-quality research projects’.

Publication date: 30 August 2017

Funding to develop dementia researchers

In Wales there at 45,000 people living with dementia and the cost of illness has been estimated at £1.4 billion per year. The highest part of this cost is unpaid care by family and friends. Support services can be fragmented and difficult for people to access across health and social care sectors. Poor transport links and the risk of carers feeling more isolated and unsupported are particular challenges for rural areas.

Researchers at Bangor University’s School of Healthcare Sciences have been awarded over half a million pounds in funding to undertake fellowships in dementia research. These fellowships, funded by Welsh Government through Health and Care Research Wales, aim to build capacity in health and social care research by supporting individuals to become independent researchers and to undertake high-quality research projects’.

Publication date: 30 August 2017

Auntie Glenda & her Dementia Friends – Launch Event

A new resource to raise awareness about dementia and created by school pupils at Ysgol Pentreuchaf, is to be launched as part of a celebration of the innovative ‘Auntie Glenda’ project. This takes place at Bangor University’s stand at the National Eisteddfod on Tuesday between 10-1.00.

Dementia is a major public health issue in Wales and the research and teaching at Bangor University is focused on increasing support to those living with the condition. It is estimated between 40,000 and 50,000 people in Wales are currently living with dementia. Symptoms can vary according to the type of dementia but the condition can affect daily tasks, communication, senses and memory.

Publication date: 1 August 2017

One social hour a week in dementia care improves lives and saves money

Person-centred activities combined with just one hour a week of social interaction can improve quality of life and reduce agitation for people with dementia living in care homes, while saving money.

The findings from a large-scale trial were presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference 2017 (AAIC) recently. The research was led by the University of Exeter, King’s College London and Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust, with participation from Bangor University, and was funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR).

Publication date: 19 July 2017

People with dementia benefit from goal-oriented therapy

Ninety people who are living with dementia and their carers from across north Wales, have contributed to new research findings which have shown that personalised cognitive rehabilitation therapy can help people with early stage dementia to significantly improve their ability to engage in important everyday activities and tasks.

The large-scale trial presented at the international Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC) 2017 on Tuesday July 18, found that cognitive rehabilitation leads to people seeing satisfying progress in areas that enable them to maintain their functioning and independence.

Publication date: 18 July 2017