Latest News

One social hour a week in dementia care improves lives and saves money

Person-centred activities combined with just one hour a week of social interaction can improve quality of life and reduce agitation for people with dementia living in care homes, while saving money.

The findings from a large-scale trial were presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference 2017 (AAIC) recently. The research was led by the University of Exeter, King’s College London and Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust, with participation from Bangor University, and was funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR).

Publication date: 19 July 2017

People with dementia benefit from goal-oriented therapy

Ninety people who are living with dementia and their carers from across north Wales, have contributed to new research findings which have shown that personalised cognitive rehabilitation therapy can help people with early stage dementia to significantly improve their ability to engage in important everyday activities and tasks.

The large-scale trial presented at the international Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC) 2017 on Tuesday July 18, found that cognitive rehabilitation leads to people seeing satisfying progress in areas that enable them to maintain their functioning and independence.

Publication date: 18 July 2017

Higher use of general health care services throughout adult life linked with traumatic childhoods

Experiencing physical, sexual or emotional abuse as a child, or other stresses such as living in a household affected by domestic violence, substance abuse or mental illness, can lead to higher levels of health service use throughout adulthood.

research paper in the Journal of Health Service Research & Policy provides, for the first time, the statistical evidence showing that, regardless of socio-economic class or other demographics, people who have adverse childhood experiences use more health and medical services through their lifetime.

Publication date: 12 July 2017

How operational deployment affects soldiers' children

So many of us have seen delightful videos of friends and family welcoming their loved ones home from an operational tour of duty. The moment they are reunited is heartwarming, full of joy and tears – but, for military personnel who were deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan post 9/11, their time away came with unprecedented levels of stress for their whole family.

Military personnel faced longer and more numerous deployments, with short intervals in between. The impact of operational deployments on military personnel’s mental health is well reported. Far less is known, however, about how deployment affects military families, particularly those with young children.

This article by Leanne K Simpson, PhD Candidate, School of Psychology | Institute for the Psychology of Elite Performance, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 23 June 2017

£1.8m funding for major new study into management of bleeding after childbirth

£1.8m funding from the UK National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) has been awarded to run a large study into the drug treatment of bleeding after childbirth (COPE).

Publication date: 21 June 2017