Latest News

Lecture to focus on early intervention in child-care

Graham Allen, who was the driving force behind the establishment of the Early Intervention Foundation, will discuss “Early Intervention-why leave it so late?” on Tuesday 6th February 2018 at 6 pm in the Eric Sunderland (MALT) Lecture Theatre, Bangor University. This is the annual Anne Marie Jones 2018 Memorial Lecture organized by the Children’s Early Intervention Trust, based at Bangor University. The public Lecture is free to attend and open to all.

Publication date: 24 January 2018

Adverse childhood experiences increase risk of mental illness, but community support can offer protection

People who have experienced abuse, neglect and other adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) such as living with domestic violence during their childhood are at much greater risk of mental illness throughout life.

Findings from a new national study across Wales found adults who had suffered four or more types of ACE were almost 10 times more likely to have felt suicidal or self-harmed than those who had experienced none.

Publication date: 18 January 2018

Why PrEP takers should still use condoms with HIV+ partners

Condoms have been the mainstay of safer sex messages for 30 years as the best way of reducing HIV transmission. In 2012, however, the US food and drug administration licensed a drug to prevent people from contracting HIV, which had previously only been used to treat the infection. This small blue pill was called Truvada, and so pre-exposure prophylaxis (or PrEP) was born. By this stage, evidence of the safety and effectiveness of Truvada in reducing HIV transmission was already strong, especially among men who have sex with men. The US decision to licence the drug was quickly followed by World Health Organisation guidelines also supporting the use of Truvada for PrEP, not as an alternative to condom use, but rather as part of a broader HIV prevention approach that included condoms.

This article by Simon Bishop, Lecturer in Public Health and Primary Care, School of Healthcare Sciences was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 12 December 2017

Yoga in the workplace can reduce back pain and sickness absence

Back pain is the single leading cause of disability in the world. In the US, four out of every five people experience back pain at some point in their life. In the UK, back pain is one of the most common reasons for visits to the doctor, and missed work. In fact, absence from work due to back problems costs British employers more than £3 billion every year.

But there is a potentially easy way to prevent this problem: yoga. Our new research has found that exercises from the ancient Indian practice can have very positive benefits for back problems. Our findings suggest that yoga programmes consisting of stretching, breathing, and relaxation methods can reduce sickness absence due to back pain and musculoskeletal conditions.

Publication date: 8 December 2017

Tears and laughter as young and old share experiences

Over recent months, in care centres across Wales, an innovative social experiment has been taking place - and the results are astonishing.

In a new series of three emotional programmes on S4C, starting Sunday, 10 December, Hen Blant Bach shows what can happen when six children share their day care with a group of pensioners - and the potential transformational effects it can have.

Publication date: 7 December 2017