News: October 2018

Family habit of inheriting volunteer roles could help small charities

Though many of us live increasingly busy lives, the number of those actively involved in volunteerism in the UK is growing. In fact, every year more than 21m people volunteer at least once. But for many people, volunteering is not just a one off, or infrequent thing. In fact, it can be a legacy, a form of tradition which is often passed down through family generations.

This article by Stephanie Jones, PhD student at the School of History, Philosophy and Social Sciences, is republished from The Conversationunder a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 30 October 2018

Bangor University student publishes ground-breaking book on local mining history

A Bangor University student has launched a book about mines in Cwm Rheidol and Ystumtuen after starting work on it when he was just eight years old.

Publication date: 29 October 2018

Cultures, challenges and injustices: Festival of Social Sciences in Bangor

From dance forms to welfare reforms, Bangor University is taking part in the Economic & Social Research Council’s Festival of Social Sciences again this year, and is inviting the public to take part in a wide variety of events.

Publication date: 29 October 2018

Magical History Tour

Bangor University are offering the chance to take a magical history tour of the Isle of Anglesey.

Publication date: 24 October 2018

Changing Wales: National research centre marks tenth anniversary

The Wales Institute of Social and Economic Research, Data and Methods (WISERD) is celebrating ten years of influencing policy and debate.

A collaboration of five Welsh universities (Aberystwyth, Bangor, Cardiff, South Wales and Swansea), WISERD has carried out a decade of pioneering research, providing important insights into the social and economic challenges facing Wales.

Publication date: 22 October 2018

Careers and Employability Fair

Publication date: 11 October 2018

Universities must look at local employment markets when building their graduates' skills

Students are often reminded that a degree is “not enough”, and that they will also need “employability skills” – a complex combination of personal attributes, discipline-specific knowledge and generic talents – to succeed after university. They are encouraged while studying to develop skills such as problem solving, self-management and the ability to work as part of a team.

This article by Teresa Crew, Lecturer in Social Policy, School of History, Philosophy & Social Sciences is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 4 October 2018

Why we should give prejudiced students a voice in the classroom

In the space of a few years, Britain’s political landscape has changed. Now, generally, young people are proportionately more likely to have socially liberal and socialist views, and want to remain part of the EU. Meanwhile, older demographics proportionately voted for Brexit, and were said to be largely responsible for voting the Conservatives into office in 2017.

This article by Corinna Patterson, Lecturer in Sociology, at the School of History, Philosophy and Social Science is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 3 October 2018