Profile of Dr Audrey Thorstad B.A. (Hons, College of St Scholastica), M.A., Ph.D. (University of Leeds)

Name
Dr Audrey Thorstad
Position
Lecturer in Early Modern History
Email
a.thorstad@bangor.ac.uk
Phone
01248 382237
Location
Room G3 Main Arts

Biography

Dr Audrey Thorstad studied History with a minor in medieval and Renaissance studies at the College of Saint Scholastica in Minnesota, where she received her B.A. with honours. She went on to receive her M.A. in Medieval History at the University of Leeds where she also pursued her Ph.D. which was awarded in 2015. She has taught at the universities of Leeds, Sheffield, and Chichester. And in 2016 she was a research assistant at the University of Huddersfield. She commenced the post of lecturer in early modern history at Bangor in 2016. She researches social, cultural, and gender history of late medieval and early modern England, Wales, and Europe.

She is especially interested in fifteenth- and sixteenth-century England, Wales, and France. Her recent work, which is currently being revised as a monograph, explores the use of space and the flow of movement in castles during the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries. Her interdisciplinary research is principally concerned with identity, displays of power and authority, spatial theory and ideas of movement, the interactions of people of different social statuses and genders, the make-up of the household, masculinity and the formation of manhood, the cult of kingship, elite lifestyle, military architecture, jousting, hunting, homosocialibility, and expressions of gender.

Areas of teaching and supervision

BA

  • The Tudors: Politics, Society, and Religion in Britain and Irealdn, 1485-1603 (Convener)
  • Gender, Sex, and Society in Early Modern Europe, 1400-1800 (Convener)
  • Debating History (Contributor)
  • BA dissertation supervision for medieval and early modern topics

MA:

  • Documents and Sources in Medieval and Early Modern History (Contributor)
  • Themes and Issues (Contributor)
  • Understanding the Middle Ages (Contributor, MA in Medieval Studies degree)
  • Palaeography (Contributor, MA in Medieval Studies degree)
  • MA thesis supervision in Medieval and Early Modern History

Current research

Dr Audrey Thorstad researches the social, cultural, political, and gender history of late medieval and early modern England, Wales, and Continental Europe, c. 1400-c. 1800. She recent work has focused on England, Wales, and France. Her interdisciplinary research is principally concerned with identity, displays of power and authority, spatial theory and ideas of movement, the interactions of people of different social statuses and genders, the make-up of the household, masculinity and the formation of manhood, the cult of kingship, elite lifestyle, military architecture, jousting, hunting, homosocialibility, and expressions of gender.

She received her Ph.D. from the School of History at the University of Leeds. Her interdisciplinary research explored the use of space, movement, chamber arrangements, and interaction in late medieval and early modern castles in England and Wales. Her research was generous funded by the Ochs Scholarship from the British Archaeological Association. A monograph based on her Ph.D. research is currently forthcoming.

Dr Thorstad has recently started a new project that examines the formation of masculine identities among the elite in England, Wales, and France during the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries. This project pays particular attention group activities such as hunting, jousting, tennis, gambling, and politics in order to gain a better understanding of how men interacted with one another and formed homosocial bonds with their peers and superiors.

She has been involved in a number of international collaborations. In 2013 she participated in a training school on using LiDAR to detect changes in pre-modern landscapes hosted and funded by the Università Degli Studi di Padova. In 2014 Dr Thorstad was invited to attend the ‘Dynamic Middle Ages’ hosted and funded by the National Research University in Moscow, Russia which brought together a number of researchers to discuss periodisation and cross-disciplinary and interdisciplinary research. She has also collaborated with colleagues from Universitat Münster on a project that examines heraldry and heraldic programmes in ceremonial and public rooms in the medieval and early modern period. Her research on heraldry used in medieval and early modern castles will feature in an edited volume produced from the project.

She has organised a key of international and interdisciplinary conferences in the fields of medieval and early modern history. In 2013 and 2014 she co-organised the Monasticism Conference at the University of Leeds, an annual conference that seeks to explore a different theme related to medieval monasticism each year. In 2014 she also co-organised the conference The Early Modernist and the Archives, which was held at the Senate House in London and presented a forum for postgraduate and early career scholars to discuss methodologies and approaches to archival research and early modern documents and sources. In 2016 she helped to organised a conference to be hosted in April 2017 marking the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther nailing his 95 Theses on the Wittenberg Church. The conference, The Material Culture of Religious Change and Continuity, will be held at the University of Huddersfield and has received major grants from the Society for Renaissance Studies and Medium Ævum.

Publications

Authored Books:

  • The Culture of Castles in Tudor England and Wales (forthcoming).
  • Homosocialibility and the Making of Masculinity in England, Wales, and France, c. 1450-c. 1550 (in preparation).

Chapters in edited books or journals:

  • ‘Establishing a Royal Connection: Tudor Iconography and the Creation of a Dynastic Grand Narrative’, in The Typology of Heraldry in State Rooms in Medieval and Early Modern Europe, ed. by Torsten Hiltmann and Miguel Metelo de Seixas (Thorbeck, 2016), forthcoming.
  • ‘There and Back Again: The Journey of a Sixteenth-Century Travelling Household’, in Elite and Royal Households in Medieval and Early Modern Europe, ed. by T. Earenfight (Brill, 2016), forthcoming.
  • ‘Ecclesiastical Licences to Crenellate: Urban Space and Rivalries in Thirteenth- and Fourteenth-Century England’, in Urban Identity: Health, Economy and Regulation, ed. by F. Sabaté and G. Carnisé (Cambridge Scholars, 2015), pp. 68-88.
  • “St George, his pilgrimage to St Davids’: A Pembrokeshire Tournament in 1506’, Pembrokeshire History Society Journal, 23 (2014), 7-18.

Book Reviews:

  • Anthony Emery, Seats of Power in Europe during the Hundred Years War (Oxbow, 2015), in Royal Studies Journal (2016), forthcoming.
  • The Howards and the Tudors: Studies in Science and Heritage, ed. by Phillip Lindley (Donington, 2015), in Society of Antiquaries (2016), forthcoming.
  • Apethorpe: The Story of an English Country House, ed. by K.A. Morrison (Yale University Press, 2016), in Society of Antiquaries (2017), forthcoming.

Publications in preparation:

  • ‘The Early Tudor Welsh Marches: A Lordship in Crisis?’, based on doctoral research, in preparation.
  • “The king takes great pleasure in talking to me of hunting’: Homosocial Bonding and the Hunt in England and France’, based on new research project, in preparation.