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Module SXP-4015:
Tackling Inequality & Injustic

Module Facts

Run by School of History, Philosophy and Social Sciences

20 Credits or 10 ECTS Credits

Semester 2

Organiser: Dr Teresa Crew

Overall aims and purpose

Social Policy is an interdisciplinary and applied subject concerned with societies' responses to social need" (The London School of Economics, 2015). The study of Social Policy has highlighted that some individuals or groups, may face greater challenges than others. This module aims to address and tackle inequalities and injustice, with a specific focus on four case studies:

  • homelessness
  • the viability of basic/minimum income,
  • accommodation for Gypsy Travellers, and;
  • people who are not in education, training or employment (NEETs).

Students will develop a number of employability skills in this module.

Course content

Subjects will include, but not limited too

  • What are inequalities, injustices and social problems?
  • Overview of how particular groups/individuals may experience inequalities and injustices
  • Tackling inequalities and injustices
  • Conducting research
  • Literature searching
  • What is a professional presentation?
  • What does a report look like? Structure, content, style etc

Assessment Criteria

excellent

Excellent students (A- and above) will show strong achievement across all the criteria combined with particularly impressive depths of knowledge and/or subtlety of analysis in relation to the chosen case study.

The report will be supported with a wealth of relevant detail/examples. They will also demonstrate an acute awareness of the relevant data, research and debates, and will be able to give an account of why the report recommendations are reached.

Oral presentations will meet the following criteria

  • Excellent delivery in terms of speed, eye contact, clarity, audibility and tone
  • Excellent content i.e discusses relevant issues, explains key terms and provides a confident understanding of the key debates.
  • Recommendations are well thought through.
  • Excellent structure: logical, easy to follow, each section relates to overall purpose
  • Excellent use of visual aids uses handouts or other visual aids, relevant to content
  • Excellent response to questions: willing to answer questions, actively seeks questions

Overall, the standards of content, argument, and analysis expected will be consistently superior to top upper-second work.

good

Good students (B+ to C-) will demonstrate achievement across some of the criteria, and will have a depth of knowledge in some areas, and/or some subtlety of analysis in relation to the chosen case study.

The report will be supported with some relevant detail/examples. They will also demonstrate some awareness of relevant data, research and debates, and/or the report recommendations will be clear, but not detailed.

Oral presentations will meet the following criteria

  • Good/ varied delivery in terms of speed, eye contact, clarity, audibility and tone
  • Good/varied content i.e discusses some relevant issues, explains some key terms and provides an understanding of some of the key debates.
  • Good recommendations which need more detail.
  • Good overall structure with some limitations: logical, easy to follow, each section relates to overall purpose
  • Good use of some visual aids i.e handouts or other visual aids, relevant to content
  • Good response to questions: willing to answer questions, actively seeks questions but needed more substance

Overall, the standards of content, argument, and analysis expected will be in the B- to B+ range.

threshold

Students in this range (D and D+) will demonstrate a satisfactory achievement across some of the criteria combined with satisfactory range of knowledge and/or some subtlety of analysis in relation to the chosen case study.

The report will be supported with a satisfactory level of detail/examples. They will also demonstrate a satisfactory awareness of some of the relevant data, research and debates, and will be able to give a satisfactory account of how the report recommendations are reached.

Oral presentations will meet the following criteria

  • Satisfactory delivery in terms of speed, eye contact, clarity, audibility and tone
  • Satisfactory content i.e discusses some relevant issues, explains some key terms and provides a satisfactory understanding of the key debates.
  • Recommendations are provided.
  • Satisfactory structure: parts are logical, easy to follow, each section relates somewhat to overall purpose
  • Satisfactory use of visual aids uses handouts or other visual aids, relevant to content
  • Satisfactory response to questions:

Overall, the standards of content, argument, and analysis expected will be satisfactory and suitable for a D or D+

Learning outcomes

  1. Demonstrate a critical analysis of various social problems

  2. Demonstrate a critical analysis of why some groups, or individuals may encounter inequalities or injustices

  3. Demonstrate report writing skills suitable for local/national government or charities

  4. Demonstrate professional presentation skills

Assessment Methods

Type Name Description Weight
REPORT Academic report

An academic report with recommendations and executive summary.

50
INDIVIDUAL PRESENTATION Individual presentation

15 minute presentation.

50

Teaching and Learning Strategy

Hours
Private study

This time should be spent on the following:

  • Meeting classmates to discuss the research project
  • Conducting small research study using questionnaire method or content analysis
  • Reading research (from reading list and searching for own material) on the various social problems/affected groups
  • Reading and making notes on how research reports are structured, how results are communicated and how existing research is incorporated
  • Watching examples of professionals give presentations - whether it be in the university , or via online formats such as Ted talks
176
Workshop

Weekly 2 hour workshops. Subjects will include, but not limited too

  • What are social problems, inequalities and injustices?
  • Overview of the experiences of particular groups/individuals that, according to research, may experience inequalities and injustices
  • What is a professional presentation?
  • What does a report look like? Structure, content, style etc
  • Literature searching
24

Transferable skills

  • Computer Literacy - Proficiency in using a varied range of computer software
  • Exploring - Able to investigate, research and consider alternatives
  • Information retrieval - Able to access different and multiple sources of information
  • Inter-personal - Able to question, actively listen, examine given answers and interact sensitevely with others
  • Critical analysis & Problem Solving - Able to deconstruct and analyse problems or complex situations. To find solutions to problems through analyses and exploration of all possibilities using appropriate methods, rescources and creativity.
  • Presentation - Able to clearly present information and explanations to an audience. Through the written or oral mode of communication accurately and concisely.
  • Teamwork - Able to constructively cooperate with others on a common task, and/or be part of a day-to-day working team
  • Argument - Able to put forward, debate and justify an opinion or a course of action, with an individual or in a wider group setting
  • Self-awareness & Reflectivity - Having an awareness of your own strengths, weaknesses, aims and objectives. Able to regularly review, evaluate and reflect upon the performance of yourself and others

Resources

Talis Reading list

http://readinglists.bangor.ac.uk/modules/sxp-4015.html

Reading list

https://rl.talis.com/3/bangor/lists/BE67666A-8AF5-C2E3-E984-F28B905EB8EB.html?lang=en&login=1

Courses including this module

Compulsory in courses:

Optional in courses: