Modules for course VVV2 | BA/PRWH
BA Philosophy and Religion and Welsh History

These are the modules currently offered on this course in the 2019–20 academic year.

You can also view the modules offered in the years: 2018–19; 2020–21.

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Year 1 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • HXW-1010: Wales since 1789 (20) or
    HXC-1006: Cymru yn y Byd Modern (20)
    Wythnos 1: Darlith: Deall Cymru fodern ac amcanion y modiwl Dim seminar Wythnos 2: Darlith: Meithrin Cymru fodern (i): Diwydiant ac economi Seminar: Siartiaeth a Beca Wythnos 3: Darlith: Meithrin Cymru fodern (ii): Trosedd, cosb a moesoldeb Seminar: Y Gymru fywgraffiadol: David Lloyd George fel astudiaeth achos Wythnos 4: Darlith: Themâu (i): Mewnfudo ac allfudo Seminar: Mewnfudo Wythnos 5: Darlith: Themâu (ii): Iaith, addysg a chrefydd yn y 19eg ganrif Seminar: Cenedlaetholdeb, Tynged yr Iaith Wythnos 6: Darlith: Themâu (iii): Effaith y ddau ryfel byd Seminar: Y Gymru Lafurol Gweithdy: Eidalwyr yng Nghymru Wythnos 7: WYTHNOS DDARLLEN Wythnos 8: Darlith: Themâu (iv): Merched a llunio Cymru fodern Seminar: Cerddoriaeth boblogaidd Wythnos 9: Darlith: Themâu (v): Diwylliant poblogaidd a newid cymdeithasol Seminar: Merched mewn llenyddiaeth Gymreig Wythnos 10: Darlith: Themâu (vi): Chwaraeon a hunaniaeth Seminar: Hunaniaeth Wythnos 11: Darlith: Materion (i): Y frwydr am hunan-reolaeth Seminar: Y Cwestiwn Cenedlaethol Wythnos 12: Darlith: Materion (ii): Creu Cymru newydd? Seminar: Sesiwn adolygu

Semester 2

  • HXW-1007: Wales: Princes to Tudors (20)
    Wales in the age of Owain Gwynedd and Lord Rhys; Gerald of Wales; rise of Llywelyn ap Iorwerth in Gwynedd and over much of the rest of Wales; the reign of Dafydd ap Llywelyn and succession to Gwynedd; the hegemony and downfall of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, prince of Wales; poetry and history writing in medieval Wales; Welsh political aspirations in l4th century; Owain Glyndŵr and his movement; Brutus, 1485 and political prophecy; Wales and the Reformation; Wales and the Renaissance; Wales and 16th-century politics – the Acts of Union.
    or
    HXC-1007: Cymru: Tywysogion i Duduriaid (20)
    Oes Owain Gwynedd a'r Arglwydd Rhys; Gerallt Gymro; Llywelyn ap Iorwerth (m. 1240) a'i feibion; Penarglwyddiaeth a chwymp Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, Tywysog Cymru (m. 1282); barddoniaeth a hanes yn yr Oesoedd Canol; dyheadau gwleidyddol Cymreig yn y bedwaredd ganrif ar ddeg; mudiad Glyndwr; Brutus, 1485 a'r traddodiad proffwydol; Cymru a'r Diwygiad Protestannaidd; Cymru a'r Dadeni; Cymru a gwleidyddiaeth yr unfed ganrif ar bymtheg - y Deddfau Uno.

Optional Modules

20 credits from:

  • HAC-1001: Y Wladwriaeth Les (20) (Semester 2)
  • HPS-1002: Power, Freedom & the State (20) (Semester 2)
  • HPS-1004: Death of God (20) (Semester 2)
  • HPS-1005: Existentialism (20) (Semester 1)
  • HXA-1005: Archaeological Principles&Tech (20) (Semester 1)
    What is archaeology?; what archaeologists study; the history of archaeological principles and techniques; archaeological techniques: surveying, excavation, scientific analysis and dating; interpretation in archaeology; internet tools and resources, aerial photography, stratigraphy and experimental archaeology.
  • HXH-1005: Intro to History and Heritage (20) (Semester 1)
    Definitions of history, heritage and archaeology; the development of museums; cabinets of curiosities; new heritage sites; heritage agencies; the state and heritage management; heritage and landscape conservation; industrial heritage; heritage and identity.
  • HPS-1006: Ess. Skills for Ac. Success (20) (Semester 1) or
    HAC-1006: Ess. Skills for Ac. Success (20) (Semester 1)
  • HXA-1006: Intro. to British Prehistory (20) (Semester 2)
    What is prehistory?; homo erectus and the earliest human societies; from ancient to modern ¿ the Middle Palaeolithic; late glacial hunters of the Upper Palaeolithic; managing the land ¿ the Mesolithic; the Meso/Neo transition; an introduction to the Neolithic; tombs for the ancestors - death and burial; communal monuments; Bronze Age beakers and barrows - rise of the individual; Stonehenge and its landscape; settlement and agriculture - the earlier/later Bronze Age transition; the production and deposition of metalwork; houses and households in later prehistory; enclosures and Iron Age 'hillforts'; Iron Age settlement and agriculture; ritual and burial practices; Late Iron Age Britain and the Romans; regional variation; social change in prehistory.
  • HXA-1008: Intro. to Historic Archaeology (20) (Semester 2)
    This course will provide a foundation for the period demonstrating the main developments using examples and showing how interpretations have changed. For the Roman Period, the course will examine the conquest and military archaeology; the countryside (villas, native settlements, farming and mineral extraction); towns; craft and the economy; religion and burial; and the end of Roman Britain. For the Early Medieval Period, the course will examine the archaeology of western Britain from the fifth to seventh centuries; Anglo-Saxon settlement and pagan cemeteries; Anglo-Saxon rural settlement; the origins of Anglo-Saxon towns; the conversion and Anglo-Saxon monasteries and churches; the Picts; the Viking impact; and the archaeology of late Anglo-Saxon England. For the Later Medieval Period, the course will examine the Norman Conquest and castles; rural settlement; the countryside; urban settlement; craft and trade; and church archaeology, including that of monasteries.

60 credits from:

  • HPS-1004: Death of God (20) (Semester 2)
  • HPS-1005: Existentialism (20) (Semester 1)
  • HPS-1007: Islam:Hist, Soc and Beliefs (20) (Semester 1)
  • VPR-1105: Ethics: Religious Perspectives (20) (Semester 2)
    The module will begin with a discussion of the origin of ethics and will examine some of the relevant survivng materials relevant to the subject from the great civilizations of Mesopotamia and Egypt (including the stories about heroes who exemplified the kind of virtues most admired, and the legal codes which defined acceptable and unacceptable conduct). The module will then examine the ethical values of the Jewish religion, as reflected in the Old Testament, and the ethical values of the Christian tradition as reflected in the New Testament. This will be followed by an overview of ethical concerns in the Buddhist tradition. The module will conclude with an examination of the ‘divine command’ theory of ethics and will consider to what extent the moral good should be identified with God’s will or God’s command.
    or
    VPC-1105: Moeseg: Agweddau Crefyddol (20) (Semester 2)
    Bydd y modiwl yn dechrau gyda thrafodaeth ar darddiad moeseg a bydd yn edrych ar beth o'r deunyddiau perthnasol i'r pwnc sydd wedi goroesi o ddiwylliannau mawr Mesopotamia a'r Aifft (yn cynnwys storïau am arwyr a ymgorfforai'r rhinweddau a edmygid fwyaf, a'r codau cyfreithiol a ddiffiniai ymddygiad derbyniol ac annerbyniol). Bydd y modiwl wedyn yn archwilio gwerthoedd moesegol y grefydd Iddewig, fel yr adlewyrchir hwynt yn yr Hen Destament, a gwerthoedd moesegol y traddodiad Cristnogol, fel yr adlewyrchir hwynt yn y Testament Newydd. Yn dilyn hynny ceir golwg gyffredinol ar faterion moesegol sy'n gysylltiedig â'r traddodiad Bwdistaidd. Daw'r modiwl i'w derfyn drwy edrych ar ddamcaniaeth foesegol 'gorchymyn dwyfol', a bydd yn ystyried i ba raddau y dylid uniaethu daioni moesol ag ewyllys Duw neu orchymyn Duw.
  • VPR-1106: Intro: Judaism & Christianity (20) (Semester 1)
    The module outlines of some of the basic tenets of the Jewish faith as reflected in the Old Testament and the Christian faith as reflected in the New Testament. Among issues considered will be the contribution to the Jewish faith by the rabbis and the controversies faced by Judaism over the centuries, culminating in a discussion of issues relating to the holocaust. Among Jewish philosophers discussed will be Maimonides and Martin Buber. The modules will then turn to the Christian faith and will examine some of the theological issues arising from the New Testament, with a particular focus on Paul’s theology and the Early Church Fathers, such as Origen and Eusebius. There will also be a discussion of a representative sample of major Christian thinkers over the centuries.
  • VPR-1110: Themes - Eastern Religion/Phil (20) (Semester 2)
    This module offers an introduction to the philosophical and religious development of key eastern religious traditions - Hinduism, Islam, Sikhism, Buddhism, Confucianism and Shinto – and provides a detailed overview of their origins, histories, doctrines and scriptures. In order to explore a wide spectrum of religious and philosophical beliefs, the following will be considered teaching priorities: (1) Survey of the beliefs and practices of six Eastern religions and philosophies; (2) understand the multifaceted religious heritage of the six Eastern religions – from the pre-modern era to contemporary religious practice; (3) Examination of the mutual influences and intersections of the Eastern religions and philosophies and how they interact with other elements of Eastern culture and society; (4) Deconstruct the East and West meeting points, focusing on the spread and influence of Eastern religion and philosophy in the West.
  • VPR-1300: Intro to Philosophy of Religio (20) (Semester 1)
    The module begins by clarifying the state of the analytic philosophy of religion at the turn of the 20th century, reflecting upon its inheritance of 19th century ‘modernity’. This is contrasted with some concurrent developments in the continental tradition (German Romanticism, Dostoevsky, Nietzsche). This is the context from which, and into which, Wittgenstein speaks. We will cover the early, middle, and late eras of Wittgenstein’s thought, and show the revolutionary impact that his thought had for the philosophy of religion. We track the various directions in which Wittgenstein’s influence was felt; for example, in A. J. Ayer’s verificationism, or those overtly ‘Wittgensteinian’ philosophers of religion such as D. Z. Phillips. The ‘meta-philosophy of religion’ is introduced throughout, as we tackle the question of how best to philosophise about religion.
  • VPR-1301: Introduction to Logic (20) (Semester 2)
  • VPC-1303: Cyflwyniad i Gristnogaeth (20) (Semester 1)

Year 2 Modules

Optional Modules

60 credits from:

  • HAC-2002: Addysg yn y Gymru Gyfoes (20) (Semester 1)
  • HGW-2003: Re-igniting the Dragon (20) (Semester 2) or
    HGC-2003: Ail Danio'r Ddraig (20) (Semester 2)
  • HAC-2009: Cymdeithas, Iaith a Phrotest (20) (Semester 2)
  • HCG-2011: Dehongli'r Gorffennol (20) (Semester 1)
    Er y byddir yn rhoi peth sylw i rai o haneswyr mawr y bedwaredd ganrif ar bymtheg – fel Ranke, Macaulay a Marx – bydd pwyslais y cwrs ar hanesyddiaeth yr ugeinfed ganrif. Canolbwyntir gan hynny ar feddylwyr a thueddiadau allweddol ym maes hanesyddiaeth yn ystod y ganrif ddiwethaf gan astudio enghreifftiau penodol o gynnyrch y meddylwyr a’r ysgolion dan sylw. Ymysg y pynciau a astudir bydd Ysgol yr Annales, Hanesyddiaeth Farcsaidd, Hanes Merched, Hanes Llafar, a her syniadaeth ôl-strwythurol ac ôl-fodern. Neulltuir yn ogystal ddwy ddarlith i drafod agweddau ar Hanesyddiaeth Cymru yn y cyfnod diweddar.
    or
    HCH-2050: Debating History (20) (Semester 1)
    The first part of the course is concerned with the use of the past made by historians and commentators such as politicians, the way traditions are invented (and destroyed), and introduces the different historiographical schools. The second part covers some historiographical (ie. concerned with the art of writing history) issues with emphasis on the various ideas about the study and writing of history which have developed over the last two centuries and which students need to understand in order to engage confidently with the different approaches which professional historians take to their work. This is taught through a case-study approach where students can apply the different approaches studied in the first part of the course to specific controversial historical subjects. The course will cover the following topics: Whig and Tory history, Ranke, the professionalisation of the study of history, nations, empire, structuralism, post-structuralism, revisionism, counter-factual history, case studies may change from year to year but will include topics such as The Peasants’ Revolt, The English civil war, the outbreak of world war one; suffrage, consumerism, the Welsh in history, the Reformation. American Civil war, Cold War; Oral history; National identity.
  • HGH-2112: Civil War: Eng & Wal 1558-1660 (20) (Semester 2)
    The course concentrates upon political and religious history - but social, cultural, economic and intellectual aspects are also considered where they are relevant to the core of the course. Major topics explored include: The ‘crisis’ of the 1590s; The impact of the arrival of the Stuart dynasty; Divisions in English Protestantism; Charles I’s Personal Rule, and the outbreak of civil war; The course of the conflict, and attempts at a settlement; The reasons for the regicide; The English Republic and the restoration, 1649-1660
  • HTA-2117: Roman Frontier Society (20) (Semester 2)
    One of the key themes of this module is the interaction between the Roman army and native populations, and the subsequent evolution of distinct frontier societies. Contextualisation will be central to the investigation of the archaeology. Examination of material evidence from military and civilian sites will include settlement, burial and environmental evidence. Iconographic and epigraphic evidence will also be examined, as will contemporary written sources (e.g. the Vindolanda letters). Key issues explored will centre on continuity and change, and topics will include syncretism and native resistance. The history of Roman scholarship and its influence on perceptions of frontier life forms an important aspect of this course, with particular emphasis given to current post-colonial approaches.
  • HGH-2118: The United States, 1877-1945 (20) (Semester 1)
    This course module is designed to provide a general but comprehensive introduction to the major themes and events of American History from 1877-1945. Topics covered include: Progressivism; the 'Incorporation' of America and the rise of big business; immigration and migration; the birth of American foreign policy; the First World War; America in the 1920s; the Stock Market Crash and the Great Depression; Pearl Harbour and the Second World War.
  • HTC-2123: Owain Glyndwr a'i Fudiad (20) (Semester 2)
    Yn unol â¿r amcanion a nodir uchod, bydd y themau a ganlyn yn cael eu trafod: 1. Beth ddigwyddodd rhwng 1400-1421? ¿ Cwrs y Gwrthryfel 2. Glynd¿r y dyn ¿ yr arweinydd a¿r arwr 3. Rhesymau dros wrthryfel ¿ i Cymru¿r drefedigaeth wedi 1282; ii Cymru a thrychinebau¿r bedwaredd ganrif ar ddeg; iii Anawsterau¿r Eglwys; iv Uchelwyr a gwerin 4. Cenedligrwydd a gwleidyddiaeth ar droad y bymthegfed ganrif. 5. Propaganda a phrydyddion ¿ y bardd yn y gymdeithas Gymreig. 6. Gwladwriaeth Gymreig y bymthegfed ganrif ¿ breuddwyd gwrach? 7. Cynlluniau¿r mudiad ar gyfer Cymru a¿i phobl ¿ Senedd, Addysg ac Eglwys 8. Cwymp y mudiad 9. Cymru wedi¿r cwymp
  • HGH-2127: Europe, Early Middle Ages (20) (Semester 1)
    1. The fall of the western Roman empire; 2. The foundation of the `barbarian¿ kingdoms; 3. Merovingians and Carolingians; 4. Charlemagne; 5. The papacy and monasticism; 6. Justinian and the Byzantine revival; 7. Culture and society; 8. Towns and economy; 9. The Vikings and the foundation of Normandy; 10. The birth of Islam and the creation of the caliphate of Cordoba. Students taking the course will study these topics using both primary sources (such as Gregory of Tours, Paul the Deacon, Einhard¿s Life of Charlemagne) and the modern historiography.
  • HTC-2128: Cestyll a Chymdeithas (20) (Semester 2)
    Bydd y modiwl yn edrych ar y themâu canlynol: 1. Cefndir a chyd-destun hanesyddiaethol; 2. Gwreiddiau cestyll y cyfnod; 3. Cestyll a chrefft rhyfela yn y cyfnod; 4. Castell pawb ei dŷ: cestyll fel cartrefi ac anheddau; 5. Astudiaeth achos 1: Cestyll y Croesgadwyr 1098-1291; 6. Cestyll y dychymyg a’r delfryd sifalrig; 7. Astudiaeth achos 2: Cestyll yng Nghymru 1063-1415; 8. Tirlun a phensaernïaeth gastellog; 9. Cestyll a chartrefi caerog yr Oesau Canol Diweddar; 10. Machlud Cestyll yr Oesau Canol? Ceir cyfle yn ystod y seminarau i archwilio’r themâu hyn ymhellach.
    or
    HTH-2157: The Age of the Castle (20) (Semester 2)
    This module explores the following themes: 1. Introduction: From the ‘Castle Story’ to Current Thinking; 2. The Origin of the Castle; 3. ‘The King of the Castle’: Great Towers and Keeps; 4. ‘An Englishman’s Home is his Castle’?: The Castle as Lordly Residence; 5. The Castles of the Crusaders 1098-1291; 6. Castles and the Chivalric Ideal; 7. The Castles of Wales 1066-1415; 8. Castles and Elite Landscapes; 9. The Decline of the Castle?; 10. Romantic Ruins? Artists, Poets and the Heritage Industry You will be given an opportunity to focus in-depth on these themes and on the underpinning primary sources in your seminars.
  • HTC-2132: Rhyfel Mawr trwy lygaid y Cym. (20) (Semester 2)
    (Wythnos 1) Cyflwyniad Darlith 1 - Adrodd hanes y Rhyfel Sut mae’r ddealltwriaeth o’r Rhyfel Mawr wedi newid dros y degawdau Seminar 1 - Trafodaeth o sut mae’r myfyrwyr yn edrych ar y Rhyfel, a’r delweddau sydd yn gyfarwydd i’r Cymry; gwylio rhaglen Y Rhwyg (1988), a gyflwynwyd gan Dr John Davies (Wythnos 2) 1880-1914 Darlith 2 - Sôn am ryfel; poeni am ryfel; paratoi at ryfel; ysu am ryfel? Darlith 3 - Gorffennaf i Awst 1914 (Wythnos 3) Gwleidyddiaeth: Lloyd George, y Rhyddfrydwyr a’r Sosialwyr Darlith 4 - Cymeriad Lloyd George; Cyfraniad Lloyd George; Chwedl Lloyd George; Atgofion Lloyd George Darlith 5 - Sosialwyr a’r Rhyfel Seminar 2 – Gwleidyddiaeth a’r Rhyfel. Sut wnaeth gwleidyddion bortreadu’r Rhyfel, yn ystod yr ymladd ac yn y degawdau canlynol. (Wythnos 4) Her i’r hen syniadau am wareiddiad Darlith 6 - Gwrthwynebwyr Cydwybodol; Merched Cymru a’r Rhyfel Seminar 3 - Ymladd a gwrthod ymladd: agweddau Gwrthwynebwyr Cydwybodol, ac agweddau cymdeithas tuag at wrthwynebwyr cydwybodol (Wythnos 5) Ennill y Rhyfel; colli’r heddwch Darlith 7 – Buddugoliaeth Lloyd George? Cytundeb Versailles Darlith 8 – Dirwasgiad a Dadrithiad: y 1920au; Gwersi 1914 a’r ymgais i gymodi â Hitler: y 1930au (Wythnos 6) Yn sgil y Dadrithio Darlith 9 – Ymateb llenyddol yn y degawdau ar ôl 1918: chwedl Hedd Wyn; All Quiet on the Western Front Seminar 4 - David Davies a’r mudiad heddwch; Dyhuddiaeth a gwrthwynebiad i’r Ail Ryfel Byd (Wythnos 7) Y Llewod a’r Asynnod Darlith 10: Trafodaeth y 1960au: ‘Lions led by Donkeys’; pwysleisio ffolineb a gwastraff y rhyfel Seminar 5 – Gwylio darnau o gyfres The Great War (BBC, 1964) (Wythnos 8) Conundrum ‘y ddau Ffrynt Gorllewinol’ Darlith 11: Y gwahaniaeth rhwng maes y gad a fodolodd yn Ffrainc a Fflandrys rhwng 1914 a 1918 a’r un dychmygol sy’n gread y cenedlaethau a edrychai nôl mewn syndod a braw Seminar 6 – Cofeb Mametz; gwylio rhaglen Mametz (S4C, 1987) (Wythnos 9) Atgofion hen wŷr Darlith 12 - Trafferthion gydag atgofion cyn-filwyr, er gwaethaf eu hatyniad amlwg Darlith 13 – atgofion Griffith Williams, Bob Owen ac Ithel Davies (Wythnos 10) Hanes Diwylliannol y Rhyfel Darlith 14 - Rhoi’r cyfan mewn i gyd-destun diwylliannol Seminar 7 – Portreadu’r Rhyfel Mawr yn y Gymraeg heddiw: Lleisiau’r Rhyfel Mawr (2008) + Sesiwn ar gyfer cyflwyniadau’r myfyrwyr
  • HGH-2135: Victorian Britain 1837-1901 (20) (Semester 2)
    (1) Victorian values (2) Economy, industry and work (3) Popular culture and leisure (4) Medicine and science (5) Technological developments (6) Poverty and crime (7) Votes for women (8) Eclipse of the elites (9) The British Empire (10) Shadows of war (11) Concluding lecture
  • HGH-2138: Europe 1945-1992 (20) (Semester 1)
  • HTH-2142: Americanisation (20) (Semester 2)
    This module examines American impacts on the rest of the world - in particular Europe - and addresses reactions to these focused by a critical approach to the concepts 'Americanisation' and 'Anti-Americanism'. In particular: . Attraction and resistance: ambivalences of Americanisation . Images and enemy images . The reciprocity of transatlantic cultural transfers . Anti-Americanism as a projection . Anti-Americanism in the inter-war period . Nazi Germany and America . GIs as agents of Americanisation . Americanisation and Sovietisation . Anti-American propaganda in the Cold War . The anti-Americanism of the New Left . Anti-Americanism and Anti-Semitism . Shopping mall, Disneyland and theme park in Europe
  • HTH-2143: The Reign of King Stephen (20) (Semester 2)
    This course offers students the opportunity to study the reign of king Stephen in the period 1135-54. It was, and has remained, controversial. Topics include: the roots of civil war: the reign of Henry I, the origins of civil war, the course of the war and the stalemate in the period1150-54, the role and characters of king Stephen and the Empress Matilda, the role of the barons, the social, economic, political impact of civil war, masculinity, kingship, queenship, women and power, attitudes to war and the role and views of the church.
  • HTH-2149: Britannia Rule the Waves (20) (Semester 1)
    (1) Introduction to the module, British Empire and Imperial Studies (2) Governing the Empire (3) British Policy and Trade (4) Technological Change (5) Scientific Exploration (6) The Empire: Asia (7) The Empire: America (8) The Empire: Africa (9) The Empire: Australasia (10) The British Empire and the Approach of War (11) Concluding lecture
  • HTC-2156: Rhyfel Cartref America (20) (Semester 1)
    Y Gogledd a’r De Gwleidyddiaeth yr 1850au Caethwasiaeth Achosion y Rhyfel a’r Argyfwng Arwahanu Ymladd y Rhyfel Abraham Lincoln Y Cymry a’r Rhyfel Y Rhyfel a’r Gorllewin Rhyddhau’r Caethweision Ennill y Rhyfel Adluniad a’i Fethiant
  • HTH-2159: History in Practice (20) (Semester 2) or
    HTW-2159: History in Practice (20) (Semester 2)
  • HTH-2163: Nazi Germany 1933-1945 (20) (Semester 1)
  • HTH-2164: Violence in Early Mod Britain (20) (Semester 1)

60 credits from:

  • HAC-2002: Addysg yn y Gymru Gyfoes (20) (Semester 1)
  • SXU-2002: Cont. Social and Political Deb (20) (Semester 1)
    There will be no set curriculum - rather this will emerge each time the module is taught depending on staff and student interests. The approach adopted will be to devote the first workshop to identifying themes and issues to be addressed, and to draw up the curriculum for that academic session in collaboration between staff and students. The workshop style of teaching and learning will allow emerging issues and contemporary debates to be addressed. Possible topics to be covered: Should drugs be legalised? Social control and the media Thinking critically about criminology Should there be a sociology of the environment? Exploring disaster capitalism Girls will be girls and boys will be boys – debunking the myth of gender. Exploring the relationship between inequality and capitalism Radicalisation, immigration, identity and racism. The Arab Spring Riots and civil liberties Thinking beyond the norm – the rationalization of ‘them’ and ‘us’
  • HPS-2008: Sociology of Religion (20) (Semester 2)
  • HAC-2009: Cymdeithas, Iaith a Phrotest (20) (Semester 2)
  • HPS-2011: Paradoxes of Self: Nietz./Jung (20) (Semester 1)
  • SXS-2035: Classical Social Theory (20) (Semester 1)
    The module introduces the classic contributions of Marx, Tocqueville, Tonnies, Weber, Durkheim and Simmel and the development of their thinking concerning modernity, capitalism, rationalisation and bureaucracy, and the question of moral and social order. The module then considers how the classic tradition has been transformed and new paths have been pursued in the contexts of Parsons' 'system theory', symbolic interactionism, critical theory and feminist social theory.
  • HTH-2163: Nazi Germany 1933-1945 (20) (Semester 1)
  • VPR-2202: Applied Ethics (20) (Semester 1)
    The module will begin with a brief outline of the various ethical challenges which face contemporary society. It will then consider the following issues: (a) world poverty (is it the responsibility of individuals or governments or both to alleviate world poverty?); (b) the arguments justifying an environmental ethic; ethical considerations to be considered in the case of voluntary and non-voluntary euthanasia; the issue of abortion and the notion of reverence for human life; war and peace (the just war theory; ethics and nuclear weapons etc).
  • VPR-2219: Comp. Philosophy: East/West (20) (Semester 2)
    This module seeks to explore two distinct philosophical traditions: Eastern and Western. Framing the module in a comparative way enables students to identify key relationships and differences that relate to major philosophical themes. In particular, the module begins by defining the comparative philosophical approach, which will be used throughout the course as the means to study the East and the West. The vast majority of the module will be dedicated to examining different metaphysical and ethical concerns. The module will explore several key thematic notions: (1) Reason and Faith (ignorance, knowledge, causation, scepticism, revelation and divinity); (2) Reality (origins, existence, monism, dualism, pluralism and naturalism); (3) Virtue (tradition, divinity, rites, human nature and altruism); (4) Mind (enlightenment, emptiness, transcendence, introspection and immanence).
  • VPR-2300: Ancient Philosophy (20) (Semester 1)
    This module provides a broad overview of, and introduction to, ancient philosophy in the Western tradition. It will cover, mainly in chronological order, the entirety of the ‘ancient’ philosophical era, beginning with the pre-Socratics, moving through Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, and onwards to Stoicism, some key Roman philosophers, and Neo-Platonism. Emphasis will be put on the connections between ancient philosophy and later philosophical or religious developments, and on the influence that ancient philosophy has had on human thought generally. Historical narrative detail will be included where relevant (e.g., Socrates’ death, the Peloponnesian War, Aristotle and Alexander the Great, etc.) to provide context. Significant emphasis will be placed on the continued relevance that ancient philosophical schools can have for our modern lives, enabling us to overcome adversity and ‘live well’.
  • VPR-2301: 20th Century Phil of Religion (20) (Semester 2)
    The module begins by clarifying the state of the analytic philosophy of religion at the turn of the 20th century, reflecting upon its inheritance of 19th century ‘modernity’. This is contrasted with some concurrent developments in the continental tradition (German Romanticism, Dostoevsky, Nietzsche). This is the context from which, and into which, Wittgenstein speaks. We will cover the early, middle, and late eras of Wittgenstein’s thought, and show the revolutionary impact that his thought had for the philosophy of religion. We track the various directions in which Wittgenstein’s influence was felt; for example, in A. J. Ayer’s verificationism, or those overtly ‘Wittgensteinian’ philosophers of religion such as D. Z. Phillips. The ‘meta-philosophy of religion’ is introduced throughout, as we tackle the question of how best to philosophise about religion.
  • VPR-2302: Faith and Reason (20) (Semester 2)
    The module is composed of two parts, each looking at the interaction of ‘faith’ and ‘reason’. In the first part, I construct a narrative regarding the origins of our modern conception of ‘reason’, contrasting this with our conception of what it is to have ‘faith’. This narrative begins with Francis Bacon and (which is the more usual philosophical starting point) Descartes. I develop this through certain key thinkers of the modern period (Spinoza, Locke, Hume), concluding with the 19th century’s conception of ‘natural theology’. I press the case that a certain conception of ‘reason’ squeezed ‘faith’ out of the picture (along with a great deal of other meaningful dimensions of human life), prompting us to ask whether we must hold to the traditional conception of ‘reason’ at any cost. The second part of the module looks at contemporary examples of the interaction of ‘reason’ and ‘faith’, in the form of the interaction of science and religion. We consider examples of science being used to support religion (‘Intelligent Design’, the ‘Fine Tuning’ argument), and to debunk religion (evolution, the cognitive science of religion), and ask whether science and religion must necessarily be in conflict with each other. No prior philosophical or scientific knowledge is presumed. A brief introduction to quantum theory will be included.
  • VPR-2303: Immanuel Kant (20) (Semester 1)
    This module provides an introduction to the thought of Immanuel Kant. It covers his contributions to metaphysics and epistemology, by discussing his ‘transcendental idealism’. It covers Kant’s significant contributions to ethics, introducing the various formulations of his ‘categorical imperative’. It covers his contributions to the philosophy of religion, in particular his moral argument for belief in God. Throughout the module, I place Kant in the context of the history of philosophy, identifying those key aspects of philosophy to which Kant was responding (i.e., rationalism and empiricism), and those philosophers whose work was shaped by Kant’s legacy. Finally, we reflect on the place Kant’s thought holds in contemporary philosophy, particularly moral philosophy.
  • VPR-2305: Hinduism in the Modern World (20) (Semester 1)
  • VPR-2408: Religious Education (20) (Semester 2) or
    VPC-2408: Addysg Grefyddol (20) (Semester 2)

Year 3 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

Semester 2

40 credits from:

20 credits from:

  • HAC-3002: Addysg yn y Gymru Gyfoes (20) (Semester 1)
  • HGW-3003: Re-igniting the Dragon (20) (Semester 2) or
    HGC-3003: Ail Danio'r Ddraig (20) (Semester 2)
  • HGH-3112: Civil War: Eng & Wal 1558-1660 (20) (Semester 2)
    The course concentrates upon political and religious history - but social, cultural, economic and intellectual aspects are also considered where they are relevant to the core of the course. Major topics explored include: The ‘crisis’ of the 1590s; The impact of the arrival of the Stuart dynasty; Divisions in English Protestantism; Charles I’s Personal Rule, and the outbreak of civil war; The course of the conflict, and attempts at a settlement; The reasons for the regicide; The English Republic and the restoration, 1649-1660
  • HTC-3123: Owain Glyndwr a'i Fudiad (20) (Semester 2)
    Yn unol â¿r amcanion a nodir uchod, bydd y themau a ganlyn yn cael eu trafod: 1. Beth a ddigwyddodd rhwng 1400-1421? ¿ Cwrs y Gwrthryfel 2. Glynd¿r y dyn ¿ yr arweinydd a¿r arwr 3. Rhesymau dros wrthryfel ¿ i Cymru¿r drefedigaeth wedi 1282; ii Cymru a thrychinebau¿r bedwaredd ganrif ar ddeg; iii Anawsterau¿r Eglwys; iv Uchelwyr a gwerin 4. Cenedligrwydd a gwleidyddiaeth ar droad y bymthegfed ganrif. 5. Propaganda a phrydyddion ¿ y bardd yn y gymdeithas Gymreig. 6. Gwladwriaeth Gymreig y bymthegfed ganrif ¿ breuddwyd gwrach? 7. Cynlluniau¿r mudiad ar gyfer Cymru a¿i phobl ¿ Senedd, Addysg ac Eglwys 8. Cwymp y mudiad 9. Cymru wedi¿r cwymp
  • HGH-3127: Europe Early Middle Ages (20) (Semester 1)
    1. The fall of the western Roman empire; 2. The foundation of the `barbarian¿ kingdoms; 3. Merovingians and Carolingians; 4. Charlemagne; 5. The papacy and monasticism; 6. Justinian and the Byzantine revival; 7. Culture and society; 8. Towns and economy; 9. The Vikings and the foundation of Normandy; 10. The creation of the caliphate of Cordoba. Students taking the course will study these topics using both primary sources (such as Gregory of Tours, Paul the Deacon, Einhard¿s Life of Charlemagne) and the modern historiography.
  • HTC-3132: Rhyfel Mawr trwy lygaid y Cym. (20) (Semester 2)
    (Wythnos 1) Cyflwyniad Darlith 1 - Adrodd hanes y Rhyfel Sut mae’r ddealltwriaeth o’r Rhyfel Mawr wedi newid dros y degawdau Seminar 1 - Trafodaeth o sut mae’r myfyrwyr yn edrych ar y Rhyfel; Dadansoddi delweddau poblogaidd o'r rhyfel ar y teledu, gan roi sylw arbennig i raglen Y Rhwyg (1988), a gyflwynwyd gan Dr John Davies (Wythnos 2) 1880-1914 Darlith 2 - Sôn am ryfel; poeni am ryfel; paratoi at ryfel; ysu am ryfel? Darlith 3 - Gorffennaf i Awst 1914 (Wythnos 3) Gwleidyddiaeth: Lloyd George, y Rhyddfrydwyr a’r Sosialwyr Darlith 4 - Cymeriad Lloyd George; Cyfraniad Lloyd George; Chwedl Lloyd George; Atgofion Lloyd George Darlith 5 - Sosialwyr a’r Rhyfel (Wythnos 4) Her i’r hen syniadau am wareiddiad Darlith 6 - Gwrthwynebwyr Cydwybodol; Merched Cymru a’r Rhyfel Seminar 2 - Ymladd a gwrthod ymladd: Sosialwyr a’r Rhyfel / Gwrthwynebwyr Cydwybodol. Dadansoddi’r disgrifiadau a gafwyd yn y wasg o’r rhai a wrthwynebodd y Rhyfel (Wythnos 5) Ennill y Rhyfel; colli’r heddwch Darlith 7 – Buddugoliaeth Lloyd George? Cytundeb Versailles Darlith 8 – Dirwasgiad a Dadrithiad: y 1920au; Gwersi 1914 a’r ymgais i gymodi â Hitler: y 1930au (Wythnos 6) Yn sgil y Dadrithio Darlith 9 – Ymateb llenyddol yn y degawdau ar ôl 1918: chwedl Hedd Wyn; All Quiet on the Western Front Seminar 3 – Dadansoddi agweddau gwleidyddion Cymreig a Phrydeinig (gan gynnwys David Davies) tuag at yr ymgyrch heddwch yn y degawdau rhwng y rhyfeloedd; dadansoddi’r gwrthwynebiad a welwyd yng Nghymru i’r Ail Ryfel Byd, a’i gymharu â dadleuon y rhai a gefnogai’r ymgyrch (Wythnos 7) Y Llewod a’r Asynnod Darlith 10: Trafodaeth y 1960au: ‘Lions led by Donkeys’; pwysleisio ffolineb a gwastraff y rhyfel Seminar 4 – Dadansoddi cynnwys a phwysigrwydd cyfres fawr The Great War (BBC, 1964) (Wythnos 8) Conundrum ‘y ddau Ffrynt Gorllewinol’ Darlith 11: Y gwahaniaeth rhwng maes y gad a fodolodd yn Ffrainc a Fflandrys rhwng 1914 a 1918 a’r un dychmygol sy’n gread y cenedlaethau a edrychai nôl mewn syndod a braw Seminar 5 – Trafod yr amrywiol ffyrdd y mae’r Cymry wedi coffâu brwydr Mametz; dadansoddi rhaglen Mametz (S4C, 1987) (Wythnos 9) Atgofion hen wŷr Darlith 12 - Trafferthion gydag atgofion cyn-filwyr, er gwaethaf eu hatyniad amlwg Seminar 6 – Dadansoddi atgofion y cyn-filwyr Griffith Williams, Bob Owen a’r gwrthwynebydd cydwybodol Ithel Davies, a thrafod eu dilysrwydd (Wythnos 10) Hanes Diwylliannol y Rhyfel Darlith 13 - Rhoi’r cyfan mewn i gyd-destun diwylliannol Seminar 7 – Dadansoddi’r modd y portreadir y Rhyfel Mawr yn y Gymraeg heddiw, gan astudio cyfres Lleisiau’r Rhyfel Mawr (S4C, 2008) + Sesiwn ar gyfer cyflwyniadau’r myfyrwyr
  • HGH-3135: Victorian Britain 1837-1901 (20) (Semester 2)
    (1) Victorian values (2) Economy, industry and work (3) Popular culture and leisure (4) Medicine and science (5) Technological developments (6) Poverty and crime (7) Votes for women (8) Eclipse of the elites (9) The British Empire (10) Shadows of war (11) Concluding lecture
  • HTH-3142: Americanisation (20) (Semester 2)
    This module examines American impacts on the rest of the world - in particular Europe ¿and addresses reactions to these focused by a critical approach to the concepts 'Americanisation' and 'Anti-Americanism'. In particular: . Attraction and resistance: ambivalences of Americanisation . Images and enemy images . The reciprocity of transatlantic cultural transfers . Anti-Americanism as a projection . Anti-Americanism in the inter-war period . Nazi Germany and America . GIs as agents of Americanisation . Americanisation and Sovietisation . Anti-American propaganda in the Cold War . The anti-Americanism of the New Left . Anti-Americanism and Anti-Semitism . Shopping mall, Disneyland and theme park in Europe
  • HTH-3143: The Reign of King Stephen (20) (Semester 2)
    This course offers students the opportunity to study the reign of king Stephen in the period 1135-54. It was, and has remained, controversial. Topics include: the roots of civil war: the reign of Henry I, the origins of civil war, the course of the war and the stalemate in the period1150-54, the role and characters of king Stephen and the Empress Matilda, the role of the barons, the social, economic, political impact of civil war, masculinity, kingship, queenship, women and power, attitudes to war and the role and views of the church.
  • HTH-3149: Britannia Rule the Waves (20) (Semester 1)
    (1) Introduction to the module, British Empire and Imperial Studies (2) Governing the Empire (3) British Policy and Trade (4) Technological Change (5) Scientific Exploration (6) The Empire: Asia (7) The Empire: America (8) The Empire: Africa (9) The Empire: Australasia (10) The British Empire and the Approach of War (11) Concluding lecture
  • HTC-3156: Rhyfel Cartref America (20) (Semester 1)
    Y Gogledd a’r De Gwleidyddiaeth yr 1850au Caethwasiaeth Achosion y Rhyfel a’r Argyfwng Arwahanu Ymladd y Rhyfel Abraham Lincoln Y Cymry a’r Rhyfel Y Rhyfel a’r Gorllewin Rhyddhau’r Caethweision Ennill y Rhyfel Adluniad a’i Fethiant
  • HTH-3157: The Age of the Castle (20) (Semester 2) or
    HTC-3128: Cestyll a Chymdeithas (20) (Semester 2)
    Bydd y modiwl yn edrych ar y themâu canlynol: 1. Cefndir a chyd-destun hanesyddiaethol; 2. Gwreiddiau cestyll y cyfnod; 3. Cestyll a chrefft rhyfela yn y cyfnod; 4. Castell pawb ei dŷ: cestyll fel cartrefi ac anheddau; 5. Astudiaeth achos 1: Cestyll y Croesgadwyr 1098-1291; 6. Cestyll y dychymyg a’r delfryd sifalrig; 7. Astudiaeth achos 2: Cestyll yng Nghymru 1063-1415; 8. Tirlun a phensaernïaeth gastellog; 9. Cestyll a chartrefi caerog yr Oesau Canol Diweddar; 10. Machlud Cestyll yr Oesau Canol? Ceir cyfle yn ystod y seminarau i archwilio’r themâu hyn ymhellach.
  • HTH-3163: Nazi Germany 1933-1945 (20) (Semester 1)
  • HTH-3164: Violence in Early Mod. Britain (20) (Semester 1)

Optional Modules

60 credits from:

  • HPS-3001: Work Placement - Semester 1 (20) (Semester 1) or
    HAC-3001: Lleoliad Gwaith - Semester 1 (20) (Semester 1)
  • HAC-3002: Addysg yn y Gymru Gyfoes (20) (Semester 1)
  • SXS-3003: Theorizing Society & Politics (20) (Semester 1)
    This module explores the origins, nature and significance of sociological theories and concepts developed in the 20th and 21st century. It examines the strengths and weaknesses of such approaches as critical theory (Adorno, Horkheimer, Marcuse et al) structuralism and neo-structuralism (Levi-Strauss, Foucault, Bourdieu), and feminist standpoint theory. It considers a range of theories which seek to address knowledge, power and subordination in terms of gender divisions and differences of class, race or sexuality. The module seeks to ask questions about the relationship between social theory, social action, sociological research and everyday life. This in turn encourages students to reflect on their own position as participants in social interaction.
  • HPS-3006: Dissertation (40) (Semester 1 + 2) or
    HAC-3006: Traethawd Hir (40) (Semester 1 + 2)
  • HPS-3008: Sociology of Religion (20) (Semester 2)
  • HPS-3011: Paradoxes of Self: Nietz..Jung (20) (Semester 1)
  • HTH-3163: Nazi Germany 1933-1945 (20) (Semester 1)
  • VPR-3302: Applied Ethics (20) (Semester 1)
    The module will begin with a brief outline of the various ethical challenges which face contemporary society. It will then consider the following issues: (a) world poverty (is it the responsibility of individuals or governments or both to alleviate world poverty?); (b) the arguments justifying an environmental ethic; ethical considerations to be considered in the case of voluntary and non-voluntary euthanasia; the issue of abortion the notion of reverence for human life; war and peace (the just war theory; ethics and nuclear weapons etc.)
  • VPR-3319: Comp. Philosophy: East/West (20) (Semester 2)
    This module seeks to explore two distinct philosophical traditions: Eastern and Western. Framing the module in a comparative way enables students to identify key relationships and differences that relate to major philosophical themes. In particular, the module begins by defining the comparative philosophical approach, which will be used throughout the course as the means to study the East and the West. The vast majority of the module will be dedicated to examining different metaphysical and ethical concerns. The module will explore several key thematic notions: (1) Reason and Faith (ignorance, knowledge, causation, scepticism, revelation and divinity); (2) Reality (origins, existence, monism, dualism, pluralism and naturalism); (3) Virtue (tradition, divinity, rites, human nature and altruism); (4) Mind (enlightenment, emptiness, transcendence, introspection and immanence).
  • VPR-3330: Ancient Philosophy (20) (Semester 1)
    This module provides a broad overview of, and introduction to, ancient philosophy in the Western tradition. It will cover, mainly in chronological order, the entirety of the ‘ancient’ philosophical era, beginning with the pre-Socratics, moving through Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, and onwards to Stoicism, some key Roman philosophers, and Neo-Platonism. Emphasis will be put on the connections between ancient philosophy and later philosophical or religious developments, and on the influence that ancient philosophy has had on human thought generally. Historical narrative detail will be included where relevant (e.g., Socrates’ death, the Peloponnesian War, Aristotle and Alexander the Great, etc.) to provide context. Significant emphasis will be placed on the continued relevance that ancient philosophical schools can have for our modern lives, enabling us to overcome adversity and ‘live well’.
  • VPR-3331: 20th Century Phil of Religion (20) (Semester 2)
    The module begins by clarifying the state of the analytic philosophy of religion at the turn of the 20th century, reflecting upon its inheritance of 19th century ‘modernity’. This is contrasted with some concurrent developments in the continental tradition (German Romanticism, Dostoevsky, Nietzsche). This is the context from which, and into which, Wittgenstein speaks. We will cover the early, middle, and late eras of Wittgenstein’s thought, and show the revolutionary impact that his thought had for the philosophy of religion. We track the various directions in which Wittgenstein’s influence was felt; for example, in A. J. Ayer’s verificationism, or those overtly ‘Wittgensteinian’ philosophers of religion such as D. Z. Phillips. The ‘meta-philosophy of religion’ is introduced throughout, as we tackle the question of how best to philosophise about religion.
  • VPR-3332: Faith and Reason (20) (Semester 2)
    The module is composed of two parts, each looking at the interaction of ‘faith’ and ‘reason’. In the first part, I construct a narrative regarding the origins of our modern conception of ‘reason’, contrasting this with our conception of what it is to have ‘faith’. This narrative begins with Francis Bacon and (which is the more usual philosophical starting point) Descartes. I develop this through certain key thinkers of the modern period (Spinoza, Locke, Hume), concluding with the 19th century’s conception of ‘natural theology’. I press the case that a certain conception of ‘reason’ squeezed ‘faith’ out of the picture (along with a great deal of other meaningful dimensions of human life), prompting us to ask whether we must hold to the traditional conception of ‘reason’ at any cost. The second part of the module looks at contemporary examples of the interaction of ‘reason’ and ‘faith’, in the form of the interaction of science and religion. We consider examples of science being used to support religion (‘Intelligent Design’, the ‘Fine Tuning’ argument), and to debunk religion (evolution, the cognitive science of religion), and ask whether science and religion must necessarily be in conflict with each other. No prior philosophical or scientific knowledge is presumed. A brief introduction to quantum theory will be included.
  • VPR-3333: Immanuel Kant (20) (Semester 1)
    This module provides an introduction to the thought of Immanuel Kant. It covers his contributions to metaphysics and epistemology, by discussing his ‘transcendental idealism’. It covers Kant’s significant contributions to ethics, introducing the various formulations of his ‘categorical imperative’. It covers his contributions to the philosophy of religion, in particular his moral argument for belief in God. Throughout the module, I place Kant in the context of the history of philosophy, identifying those key aspects of philosophy to which Kant was responding (i.e., rationalism and empiricism), and those philosophers whose work was shaped by Kant’s legacy. Finally, we reflect on the place Kant’s thought holds in contemporary philosophy, particularly moral philosophy.
  • Students may choose whether to take the dissertation in Philosophy/Religion or their other subject