Comparative Criminology and Criminal Justice MA/PGDip/PGCert

Overview

Course facts

  • Name: Comparative Criminology and Criminal Justice
  • Qualification: MA/PGDip/PGCert
  • Duration: 1 year full-time. This programme offers both January and September start

The course was one of the first to take an internationally comparative perspective across a broad range of criminology and criminal justice issues. It is designed to meet the needs of three groups of potential students: those requiring a thorough research training specialising in criminology and criminal justice; those who are interested in pursuing criminology and criminal justice to an advanced level; and practitioners in the criminal justice field who wish to expand their horizons from national to international levels. The programme components consist of a generic research module (The Research Process) for training in qualitative and quantitative research methods in the Social Sciences, specialised training in Applied Research Criminology and a module on international case studies in Criminology, which allows students to incorporate their particular research interests and areas of enquiry in comparative criminological and criminal justice research. The MA includes a 20,000 word dissertation.

Research Interests of the Criminology and Criminal Justice Team

  • Youth homelessness and crime
  • Institutional child abuse
  • Critical approaches to law, crime and criminology
  • Sociology of law
  • Public opinion on crime and criminal justice
  • Penal policy
  • Rural criminology
  • Lay judges and jurors
  • Procedural justice
  • Popular legal culture, including film and TV
  • Victimology
  • Islamic extremism and terrorism
  • Trust in courts, police and the legal profession

Teaching and assessment methods

Teaching occurs via lectures, seminars and tutorials given by research experts in the School of Social Sciences. The team of lecturers employs the concept of ’active learning’ by students. Assessment methods include essays, assignments, presentations and a 20,000 word dissertation.

 

Course content is for guidance purposes only and may be subject to change.

Course Content

The course aims to provide advanced training in research and analysis, linking theoretical awareness with empirical studies in criminology and criminal justice. The taught element of the course is studied by both MA and Diploma students and consists of core research training and theory modules, plus a module focussing on international and comparative criminological and criminal justice research. MA students who successfully complete the taught element proceed to the research dissertation.

Modules:

  • Transnational Crime
  • Comparative and International Criminal Justice
  • Research Design and Strategy
  • Research Process and Meaning
  • Social Science in Action
  • Social Science in Action 2
  • Key Issues in Criminology
  • Troseddeg Fforensic (Welsh medium)

MA students also take part in the fortnightly lecture series of the School of Social Sciences. Visiting speakers and Bangor staff present topics related to social policy, criminology and sociology.

Research Dissertation:

The dissertation is a piece of independent research where you are expected to apply your research skills to a specific criminological or criminal justice topic. You will conduct this work with academic guidance provided by your supervisor who will be a member of the criminology and criminal justice team. 

Modules for the current academic year

Module listings are for guide purposes only and are subject to change. Find out what our students are currently studying on the Comparative Criminology and Criminal Justice Modules page.

Entry Requirements

A single or joint honours degree of at least 2(ii) classification in Criminology, Sociology, Law, Political Science, Social Studies, Social Policy, or a related academic discipline.

Applications from candidates who have relevant professional experience in lieu of a bachelor degree will also be considered. All applicants in this category will be invited for interview.

If your native language is not English, you must provide satisfactory evidence that you have an adequate knowledge and understanding of written and spoken English: 

  • IELTS: 6.0 (with no element below 5.5)
  • Pearson PTE: a score of 56 (with no element lower than 51)
  • Cambridge English Test – Advanced: 169 (with no element lower than 162)

International Students

For information and further detailed guidance on entry requirements for International Students, including the minimum English Language entry requirement, please visit the Entry Requirements by Country pages on the International Education Centre section of our website.

Ask the IEC for assistance...

If you want advice or a general chat about what’s available contact the International Education Centre on +44 (0) 1248 382028 or email international@bangor.ac.uk

Apply

How to Apply

International students

  • Agents: if you are an agent applying on behalf of the student, then you can Apply here. For further guidance click here

Need help applying? International students please contact:

International Education Office: international@bangor.ac.uk or write to

International Education Centre
Bangor University
Gwynedd
LL57 2DG

Telephone: +44 (0) 1248 382028

When to apply

The University will accept applications throughout the year, but we would generally advise that you send in your application form by the end of June (for September intake) or the end of October (for January intake) to ensure that you have time to make any funding and/or accommodation arrangements, and for documents such as transcripts and references to be obtained if not submitted with the application. This will also give you more time to meet any conditions we may potentially attach to an offer (e.g. taking an IELTS Test to meet the English Language requirement).

Careers and Employability

The course prepares for a wide range of employment including:

  • Law-enforcement agencies: the police, customs, the prison service
  • Public administration: including crime prevention units, offender management, general administration, international institutions
  • Political associations, work for members of parliaments, for lobby groups related to the criminal justice system and to issues of social justice broadly conceived
  • Research institutes, researching criminological and sociological issues
  • Academic institutions such as universities

Further information

Contact us

Study modes

Full Time Study In full-time mode, the course normally lasts for a period of twelve months. Taught courses are undertaken September – May, and the dissertation completed from May to September. Part Time Study In part-time mode, the course normally lasts for a period of two and a half years. Taught courses are undertaken from September to May over a period of two years, and on successful completion of the 120 credits of taught courses, the dissertation may be undertaken. Lectures are concentrated on one day per week for part-time students.

Funding

The School offers bursaries for MA and PhD students. These vary in value up to £3,390 and are open to UK/EU and overseas students.

Bursaries will be awarded on the strength of applications received. Whilst academic achievement is a key criterion, a broad view of each candidate's academic, work experience and life achievements will be considered.

In addition to completing the University application form, please complete a Social Sciences Bursary application form.

The deadline for submission of funding applications is 30 June.

Click here for further details.

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