Modules for course F101 | MCHEM/CIND
MChem Chemistry with Industrial Experience

These are the modules currently offered on this course in the 2019–20 academic year.

You can also view the modules offered in the years: 2018–19; 2020–21.

Find out more about studying and applying for this degree.

Use the buttons after the module titles (where available) to see a brief description of the content, or:
Show all descriptions
Hide all descriptions

Year 2 Modules

Year 3 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • FXX-9000: Industrial Placement one year (120)
    You will attend a work placement, as arranged by yourself in conjunction with the School of Chemistry and taking into account personal preferences, for the duration of the academic year (minimum 9 months). The School will maintain contact with you throughout the year through your personal tutor. This contact will be by telephone, letter, visit or e-mail. You will be assigned an industrial supervisor at the placement location, who will be responsible for the day-to-day management of your work placement. A brief description of the plan for your placement (up to one A4 page) should be drawn up prior to commencing the placement and this should be sent to the Placement Officer in Chemistry. The nature of the placement can take many forms (e.g. one project that runs for the whole placement or several smaller projects). The placement can be in any area of chemistry (from commercial issues right through to research and development work). However, it is expected that your placement activities should contain an element of project work which can be written up in a report at the end of the placement (see below). At the end of the placement period, the industrial supervisor will be asked to complete a questionnaire on your attributes and progress and these marks will be a major component of the assessment of your industrial year (please see details below). The placement officer will be able to advise on this procedure if required. You will be expected to write-up your activities in the form of a final report (25-30 pages) which is assessed by your personal tutor and one other academic from the School of Chemistry. If deemed appropriate by the Company, part or all of this report can be marked as confidential and it will be marked and handled accordingly You will be expected to undertake academic work in addition to the industrial work during your placement year. This additional work will comprise 4 pieces as follows:- (1) Coursework - deadline end of September of the following year (2) Oral presentation to your industrial supervisor and your personal tutor. This will take place around Easter. You will be asked to arrange a convenient date for yourself, your industrial supervisor and your personal tutor. (3) Report on your industrial placement - deadline end of September of the following year (4) Oral Examination on your placement report - this exam should take place in November of the following year. The year in industry placement mark (year 3) will be incorporated into your final mark which determines your degree classification as follows:- Four Year BSc (Hons) Chemistry with Industrial Experience (F103) Four Year BSc (Hons) Environmental Chemistry with Industrial Experience (F142) Year 2 (16.5%), Year 3 (year in industry) (16.5%), Year 4 (67%) Five year MChem (Hons) Chemistry with Industrial Experience (F101) Year 2 (8.5%), Year 3 (year in industry) (8.5%), Year 4 (33%), Year 5 (50%) Course Team: Dr C Gwenin and Industrial Supervisor RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING - None RECOMMENDED - None SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS Students will be based at companies that may not be local to Bangor and will need to make appropriate accomodation/travel arrangements.

Semester 2

  • FXX-9000: Industrial Placement one year
    You will attend a work placement, as arranged by yourself in conjunction with the School of Chemistry and taking into account personal preferences, for the duration of the academic year (minimum 9 months). The School will maintain contact with you throughout the year through your personal tutor. This contact will be by telephone, letter, visit or e-mail. You will be assigned an industrial supervisor at the placement location, who will be responsible for the day-to-day management of your work placement. A brief description of the plan for your placement (up to one A4 page) should be drawn up prior to commencing the placement and this should be sent to the Placement Officer in Chemistry. The nature of the placement can take many forms (e.g. one project that runs for the whole placement or several smaller projects). The placement can be in any area of chemistry (from commercial issues right through to research and development work). However, it is expected that your placement activities should contain an element of project work which can be written up in a report at the end of the placement (see below). At the end of the placement period, the industrial supervisor will be asked to complete a questionnaire on your attributes and progress and these marks will be a major component of the assessment of your industrial year (please see details below). The placement officer will be able to advise on this procedure if required. You will be expected to write-up your activities in the form of a final report (25-30 pages) which is assessed by your personal tutor and one other academic from the School of Chemistry. If deemed appropriate by the Company, part or all of this report can be marked as confidential and it will be marked and handled accordingly You will be expected to undertake academic work in addition to the industrial work during your placement year. This additional work will comprise 4 pieces as follows:- (1) Coursework - deadline end of September of the following year (2) Oral presentation to your industrial supervisor and your personal tutor. This will take place around Easter. You will be asked to arrange a convenient date for yourself, your industrial supervisor and your personal tutor. (3) Report on your industrial placement - deadline end of September of the following year (4) Oral Examination on your placement report - this exam should take place in November of the following year. The year in industry placement mark (year 3) will be incorporated into your final mark which determines your degree classification as follows:- Four Year BSc (Hons) Chemistry with Industrial Experience (F103) Four Year BSc (Hons) Environmental Chemistry with Industrial Experience (F142) Year 2 (16.5%), Year 3 (year in industry) (16.5%), Year 4 (67%) Five year MChem (Hons) Chemistry with Industrial Experience (F101) Year 2 (8.5%), Year 3 (year in industry) (8.5%), Year 4 (33%), Year 5 (50%) Course Team: Dr C Gwenin and Industrial Supervisor RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING - None RECOMMENDED - None SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS Students will be based at companies that may not be local to Bangor and will need to make appropriate accomodation/travel arrangements.

Year 4 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • FXX-3116: Project - Quadruple Module (40) Core
    CORE MODULE. This module is CORE to your degree programme. In order to progress to the next year of study or qualify for a degre you MUST successfully complete and pass this module. This practical module concentrates on an area of research in a sub-discipline (organic, inorganic, physical) of your choosing. You will be required to undertake chemical laboratory / computational / instrumental research for a considerable period of time each week (approx. 18 hours) and to write-up a 40 page report on your findings. Course Team: Project Supervisor, Research Committee Members (2) RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING - None RECOMMENDED READING - None SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS - None
  • FXX-3201: Separation Science (10)
  • FXX-3503: Research Skills (10)
    The main topics covered are:- 1. Identifying and retrieving chemical research information (from peer reviewed journals and academic databases) 2. Organising, summarising and integrating the chemical literature 3. Public understanding of science 4. Project management tasks- focusing on project planning and monitoring. 5. Understanding nature of the scientific method and ethics. 6. Have an awareness of current chemistry research (RSC lectures) 7. Participate in career/employability workshops. Course Team: Dr R Davies (3 lectures), Dr M Lahmann (3 lectures), Dr H Tai (6 lectures), Dr L Murphy (6 lectures), Dr M Beckett (3 lectures), Employability (1 lecure) non credit bearing. RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING 1. Study and Communication Skills for the Chemical Sciences Tina Overton, Stuart Johnson, and Jon Scott 2011 (OUP) RECOMMENDED READING none SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS It is expected that students will purchase or have ready access to the essential text books above
  • FXX-3507: Advanced Physical Chemistry (10)
    Techniques in Quantum Chemistry (12 hours) - Techniques in Quantum Chemistry - Introductory matrix algebra. Potential surfaces, minima and transition structures. Molecular mechanics. Hartree-Fock and density functional theories. Emphasis is on the techniques, reliability and current applications (including computer packages) of modern computational quantum chemistry in electronic structure theory. Techniques of geometry optimization. Chemical Dynamics (12 hours) The course begins with a brief introduction to statistical thermodynamics with the goal of introducing partition functions. Transition State theory is then discussed followed by a review and classification of potential energy surfaces. The course then focusses on quantum dynamics where the time-dependent Schroedinger equation is introduced. Course Team : Professor B Paizs, Dr K Hughes RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING Physical Chemistry, Atkins (OUP)* *Most recent editions of this as it is regularly updated. RECOMMENDED READING 1. Chemical Modeling from Atoms to Liquids, A Hinchcliffe, (John Wiley & Sons Ltd 1999) 2. Atoms in Molecules: Quantum Theory (The International Series of Monographson Chemistry No 22), Richard F. W. Bader, (OUP) 3. Reaction Dynamics, M. Brouard (Oxford Chemistry Primer 1998) 4. Chemical Kinetics and Dynamics, J.I. Steinfield, J.S. Francisco, W.L. Hase, 2nd edition, 1999 SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS It is expected that students will purchase or have ready access to the essential text books above
  • FXX-3510: Core Organic Chemical Concepts (10)
    Physical organic chemistry and synthesis This section details some principal physical-organic aspects. The characteristics of reactions, with emphasis on cyclization reactions, will be discussed in terms of the Frontier Orbital Theory and the Hammond principle. Organic chemistry inspired by Nature During this unit examples of natural product synthesis will be discussed and compared with the chemistry in biological systems. Some fundamental organic reactions will be revisited and related to the biological pathways. Course Team: Professor M Baird (10 lectures), Dr P Murphy (10 lectures) RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING 1. Organic Chemistry, Jonathan Clayden, Nick Greeves, Stuart Warren and Peter Wothers (2nd Ed 2012) RECOMMENDED READING 1. March's Advanced Organic Chemistry Reactions, Mechanisms and Structure, M B Smith and J. March (McGraw-Hill 2001) 2. Physical Basis of Organic Chemistry , H Maskill (OUP 1993) 3. Molecular Orbitals and Organic Chemical Reactions: by Ian Fleming. Student Edition Paperback 2009 Publisher Wiley-Blackwell SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS

Semester 2

  • FXX-3116: Project - Quadruple Module
    CORE MODULE. This module is CORE to your degree programme. In order to progress to the next year of study or qualify for a degre you MUST successfully complete and pass this module. This practical module concentrates on an area of research in a sub-discipline (organic, inorganic, physical) of your choosing. You will be required to undertake chemical laboratory / computational / instrumental research for a considerable period of time each week (approx. 18 hours) and to write-up a 40 page report on your findings. Course Team: Project Supervisor, Research Committee Members (2) RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING - None RECOMMENDED READING - None SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS - None
  • FXX-3505: Organomet Chem & Catalysis (10)
    The first section of the lecture course covers organometallic compounds and compounds. Basic concepts and terminology of organometallic chemistry, 18e Rule; electron counting. Survey of metal ligand bonding. The synthesis and reactions of organometallic compounds - eta1-alkyls; eta2-carbenes, alkenes, alkynes, eta3-allyls, eta4-butadienes, eta5-pentadienyls, eta6-arenes. The important reactions: oxidative insertion, reductive elimination, group migration (insertion), metathesis, dimerization, oligomerization and polymerisation. The focus is on the development of a basic understanding of organometallic ligands to give the ability to understand organometallic compounds in catalysis. The relative importance and value of heterogeneous and homogenous catalysis is studied. Catalytic reactions are selected from: hydroformylation (OXO process), Monsanto acetic acid process, alkene hydrogenations, asymmetric hydrogenations and metathesis reactions. Organics and Organometallics/Catalysis The synthesis of natural and non-natural compounds using organometallic chemistry particularly catalytic methodologies. Topics including nucleophilic substitution, cross coupling, cyclisation chemistry and metathesis will be covered. Course Team: Dr L Jones (12 lectures), Prof I Perepichka (12 lectures) RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING - None RECOMMENDED READING 1. Organometallics 1 - Complexes with transition-metal-carbon sigma-bonds, M Bochman, (OUP 1999) 2. Organometallics 2 - Complexes with transition-metal-carbon pi-bonds, M Bochman, (OUP 1999) SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS - None
  • FXX-3506: General Skills (10)
    This module also consists of sessions involving problem solving in organic, physical and inorganic chemistry. There is also a group based problem solving session. The course involves the students in précis writing and presentational skills as part of the assessment of this module. Course Team: Dr C Gwenin, Dr K Hughes, Dr I Butler. Dr L Murphy, Dr M Beckett, Dr P Murphy, Prof I Perepichka (Teaching) All Academic staff (assessments). RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING 1. Organic Chemistry, Clayden, Greeves, Warren and Wothers (OUP)* 2. Inorganic Chemistry, C E Housecroft, A G Sharp (Prentice Hall)* 3. Physical Chemistry, Atkins (OUP)* *Most Recent editions of these as they are regularly updated. RECOMMENDED READING none SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS It is expected that students will purchase or have ready access to the essential text books above
  • FXX-3508: Core Physical Chem Concepts (10)
    This module is comprised of two taught lecture courses containing materials on dynamic electrochemistry, crystallography, basic surface kinetics. Electrode Dynamics This part of the course aims to provide detailed analysis of the kinetics of reactions at metallic electrodes. Modern techniques for studying rates of electron transfer and mass transport will be discussed in detail. The course will terminate with examples on electrocatalysis and corrosion, to show how modern electrochemical techniques can be used to study electrode kinetics. X-ray/Neutron diffraction Revision of basic crystallography, reciprocal lattice, generators, atomic bases, calculation of structure factors from atomic scattering factors (6 lectures): Adsorption: comparison of different isotherms (e.g. Langmuir vs BET), basic surface kinetics (6 lectures). Course Team: Dr C Gwenin (12 lectures), Dr J Thomas (12 lectures). RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING 1. Physical Chemistry, Atkins (OUP)* *Most recent edition of this as it is regularly updated. 2. Electrode Dynamics (Oxford Chemistry Primers) A. C. Fisher RECOMMENDED READING 1. A first course in electrode processes: D. Pletcher 2. Electrochemical Methods: Bard and Faulkner Instrumental methods in Electrochemistry; Southampton Electrochemistry group SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS It is expected that students will purchase or have ready access to the essential text books above
  • FXX-3509: Advanced Org and Inorg Chem (10)
    This module covers inorganic reaction mechanisms and advanced organic synthesis with focus on asymmetric synthesis. Reaction Mechanisms. Classification of inorganic reaction mechanisms. What is a reaction mechanism? How are reaction mechanism studied? Kinetics. Reaction profiles for A, Ia Id and D mechanisms. Substitution at 4-coordinate transition-metal sites: Tetrahedral - Co-ordinatively saturated complexes (D mechanism); unsaturated complexes (A mechanism); competing mechanisms and temperature effects. Square-planar - Associative mechanisms and the role of solvent; evidence for a solvent intermediate; stereochemistry of substitution; influence of entering group (nucleophilicity scales); influence of spectator ligand (trans effect); influence of leaving group; dissociative mechanisms at square planar sites. Substitution at six-coordinate octahedral sites: role of solvent; the solvolysis reaction (leaving group; spectator ligands and stereochemistry); displacement of coordinated solvent (solvent exchange, inert/labile, CFAE, Eigen-Wilkins Id mechanism). Direct substitution without solvent interaction. Base catalysed hydrolysis (Dcb mechanism, tbp intermediate); acid catalysed hydrolysis; redox catalysed substitution. Electron-transfer reactions; classification of reactions: stoichiometry (complementary and noncomplementary reactions), mechanism (inner sphere and outer sphere); differentiation between inner and outer sphere reactions. Outer sphere reactions: self-exchange reactions and Marcus cross theory. This section of the module will revise and expand core concepts of selectivity and specificity, kinetic vs. thermodynamic control, regio- and stereo control. Also, strategies and challenges in ring formation will be discussed. The material will be illustrated with examples of total synthesis, examined both from the synthetic, retrosynthetic and mechanistic perspective. A particular emphasis will be on diastereoselective and asymmetric synthesis (resolution, asymmetric induction, chiral auxiliary, chiral pool, organo catalysis, bio catalysis, asymmetric catalysis) in the view of both research and industrial applications. Course Team: Dr M Beckett (12 lecutres), Dr M Lahmann (12 lectures) RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING 1. Inorganic Chemistry, 3rd Ed., C E Housecroft & A G Sharpe (Prentice Hall), 2008. 2. Organic Chemistry Jonathan Clayden, Nick Greeves, Stuart Warren and Peter Wothers (2nd Ed 2012) RECOMMENDED READING 1..Advanced Inorganic Chemistry, 5th Ed., Cotton & Wilkinson (Wiley) SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS - None

Year 5 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • FXX-4113: Advanced Chemical Techniques (10)
    The course contains three selected, modern chemistry techniques practicals (NMR, Mass spectrometry (MS) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) coupled with a statistics / data analysis workshop. The NMR practical focuses on the acquisition and analysis of 1H data and analysis of 29Si and 11B data. The MS practical focuses on the use GCMS and LCMS in the analysis of complex mixtures. The X-ray diffraction practical focuses on traditional of X-ray diffraction for solid state materials. Course Team: Dr V Thoss (3 x 4 hrs workshops and 1 lecture), Dr J Thomas (1 lecture), Prof B Paizs (1 lecture), Dr M Beckett (1 lecture) RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING - None RECOMMENDED 1. Chemical Analysis - Modern Instrumentation, Methods and Techniques. F. Rouessac and A, Rouessac 2007 2. Spectrometric Identification of Organic Compounds. by Silverstein, Bassler and Morrill (Wiley)* 3. The Art and Science of Chemical Analysis by Enke (Wiley) *Most recent edition of this as it is regularly updated. SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS - None
  • FXX-4501: Structure & Reactivity (Org) (10)
    This part will overview electronic structure of electro- and photoactive conjugated aromatic systems, electron donor-acceptor interactions in Pi-systems, methods of their studies and relationships between the geometric and electronic structures of conjugated aromatics. It will provide an introduction to analysis electronic energy levels from electrochemistry and optical spectroscopy studies, effects of extended Pi-conjugation on properties of conjugated oligomers and polymers, and current concepts in design and applications of novel materials based on such systems in organic electronics.. This part will illustrate strategic approaches to the toal synthesis of selected marine and terrestrial natural products. Course Team; Prof I Perepichka (12 lectures), Dr P Murphy (12 lectures) RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING - None RECOMMENDED READING 1. Organic Chemistry, Jonathan Clayden, Nick Greeves, Stuart Warren and Peter Wothers (2nd Ed 2012) SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS - None
  • FXX-4502: Processes at Interfaces (10)
    The course is subdivided into 4 parts with a different lecturer teaching each part: 1. Processes occurring at electrode interfaces 2. Electron transfer kinetics at interfaces 3. Introduction to nanoscopic materials at the liquid-liquid interface. 4. Surface Chemistry Course Team: Dr C Gwenin (6 lectures), Dr K Hughes (6 lectures), Dr R Davies (6lectures), Dr JThomas (6 lectures) RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING Physical Chemistry, Atkins (OUP)* *Most recent edition of this as it is regularly updated. RECOMMENDED READING None SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS None
  • FXX-4503: Adv. topics in Inorg. Chem. (10)
    (12 lectures) - Inorganic materials described have ultimate applications as 'smart' materials, crystal engineered electronic materials, nano engineered materials and sensors. (12 lectures) - Structure and shapes of boron hydrides: historical introduction, definitions and terminology, shapes of binary boron hydrides, nomenclature. Bonding in boranes: valence bond approach to B2H6, Linear Combination of Atomic Orbital (LCAO) approach, styx numbers and bonding in boranes. Predicting the topology of boron hydrides: molecular orbital theory for B6H62-, electron counting rules (Wade's rules) as derived from MO theory. Chemistry of typical boron hydrides: preparation and interconversion of boron hydrides, reactions of diborane(6), reactions of decaborane(14). Carboranes: electron counting rules for predicting structures, synthesis of carboranes, mechanisms of interconversions of 1,2-C2B10H12 to 1,7- and 1,12- isomers, metal complexes. 'Naked' main group clusters: polyatomic Zintl anions of Sn, Pb, Bi; application of Wade's rules; polyatomic Bi cluster cations. The isolobal analogy: bonding in octahedral metal complexes; metal-ligand fragments of an octahedron in relation to main group fragments. Metal complexes of boron hydrides: MLx fragments for use in Wade's rules; preparative reactions to form readily available boron hydride anions; metal complexes of anions. High nuclearity carbonyl clusters: total electron counts (TEC) for large metal clusters; capped structures; explanations of the structures observed for large Os, Rh, and Ni/Pt carbonyl clusters. Course Team: Dr I Butler, Dr M Beckett RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING 1. Inorganic Chemistry, C E Housecroft, A G Sharp (Prentice Hall)* *Most Recent edition of this as it is regularly updated RECOMMENDED READING 1. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 6th Ed., F. Albert Cotton, Geoffrey Wilkinson, Carlos A. Murillo and Manfred Bochmann (Wiley), 1999. 2. Teaching General Chemistry – a Materials Science Companion”, A.B. Ellis et al., (American Chemical Society, Washington, 1993) 3. Cluster Molecules of the p-block elements, C E Housecroft (Oxford Chemistry Primer 1994) 4. Non-metal Rings, Cages and Clusters, Woollins (Wiley 1987) SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS
  • FXX-4505: Web-based Literature Review (10)
    This module requires preparation of a literature review on a specified research topic and presentation of this review in a web based format. Course Team: Dr H Tai RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING 1. Study and communication skills for the chemical sciences - Overton, Tina c2011 RECOMMENDED READING - None SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS It is expected that students will purchase or have ready access to the essential text book above
  • FXX-4999: Laboratory Health & Safety (10)
    CORE MODULE. This module is CORE to your degree programme. In order to progress to the next year of study you MUST successfully complete and pass this module. This course gives a basic grounding in safety training. A series of videos/lectures are used to give the students awareness of all safety issues which include legal requirements, filling in COSHH assessment forms, use of data bases etc. The students also participate in an intensive first aid course under the guidance of the Red Cross, the successful completion of which results in certification. Also included is a practical fire fighting course where the students learn the basis of fire prevention, the correct techniques in the use of and choices of fire extinguishers. Finally the students are expected to put together a small portfolio to indicate that they have put the knowledge into practice in their course e.g. demonstrate the proper use of COSHH assessments etc. This will be backed up by their supervisor's/line manager's input. Course Team: Dr P J Murphy (3hrs), Red Cross Trainer (4 hrs), Fire Trainer (4 hrs). RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING - None RECOMMENDED - None SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS - None

Semester 2

  • FXX-4507: Practical Project (MChem) (60) Core
    CORE MODULE. This module is CORE to your degree programme you MUST pass this module to qualify for a degree. This practical module concentrates on an area of research in a sub discipline (organic, inorganic, physical) of your choosing (but with a different supervisor to that which you had in year 3). You will be required to undertake chemical laboratory / computational / instrumental research full time for 10 weeks and then write up your findings in the style of an RSC journal. Include all appropriate data either within the main text of the article or as supplementary data. Your experiences gained in your 3rd year project will be of considerable benefit to you in this your second and final extended project. Course Team: Project Supervisor, Research Committee Members (2) RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING - None RECOMMENDED READING - None SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS - None