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Module HPS-0001:
Debating the disciplines

Module Facts

Run by School of History, Philosophy and Social Sciences

20 Credits or 10 ECTS Credits

Semester 2

Organiser: Prof Peter Shapely

Overall aims and purpose

We are often influenced by individual texts in our discipline, which can challenge the way we think about, and approach, our subject areas. This module will introduce students to concepts and ideas in the subjects of History, Archaeology, Religion, Philosophy, and the Social Sciences through the exploration of a number of texts. This will introduce students to issues of inter-disciplinarity. Staff within the School of History, Philosophy and Social Sciences will introduce and discuss texts that have proved influential for them. In turn, students will identify an influential text to critique, firstly in an oral presentation (formative assessment), and finally in the end of module essay (summative assessment).

Course content

Each week a single text will be introduced in the lecture, the presenter exploring the significance of the work to their subject area (be it History, Archaeology, Religion, Philosophy or the Social Sciences). Seminars will provide an opportunity to discuss the ideas and concepts introduced in the lectures in greater detail, and will allow for inter-disciplinary discussions. Welsh medium provision: Students may deliver presentations and/or submit essays through the medium of Welsh. A number of Welsh-language texts will be presented during the lecture series.

Assessment Criteria

excellent

A- and above · Has developed a broad factual and conceptual understanding of the subject relative to the level through extensive reading;

· Has analysed and evaluated information using defined techniques & principles; Can collate and categorise ideas and information and can select what is relevant to support analysis and evaluation and develop a coherent argument, appropriate to the level of development; Has developed an early critical approach to information;

· Can generate a range of appropriate responses to given problems, some of which may be innovative; good reference to and application of research –informed literature;

· Well-organised presentation which develops flow and progression in a well-structured argument; Syntax/grammar indicates an appropriate level of maturity; Demonstrates a broad range of qualities and transferable skills required for employment;

· Can collect and interpret appropriate data and successfully undertake research tasks with a degree of autonomy;

· Can communicate very effectively in a range of formats, including orally, appropriate to the discipline(s);

· Can work very effectively with others as a member of a group, showing leadership skills where appropriate, and meet all obligations to others (eg tutors and peers);

good

C- to C+ · Has developed a sound understanding of the subject appropriate to this level; There is evidence of wider reading which goes beyond that gained from tutor contact;

· Intelligent attempt at analysing and evaluating information; Well argued with appropriate amount of evidence, substantiated opinions are given;

· Can apply knowledge of research-informed literature to different contexts and generate a range of responses to given situations;

· Structure is coherent and logical showing progression to the argument; There are few mistakes in presentation or citation; Demonstrates qualities and transferable skills required for employment;

· Can collect and interpret appropriate data/ information and undertake straightforward research tasks with external guidance;

· Can communicate effectively in a range of formats, including orally, appropriate to the discipline(s);

· Can work effectively with others as a member of a group, and meet obligations to others (eg tutors and peers);

· Able to evaluate own strengths and weaknesses in relation to professional and practical skills identified by others;

threshold

D- to D+ · Has developed a basic level of factual and conceptual understanding of the subject; Reading/research is limited to that gained through class contact;

· There is some evidence of analysis and evaluation but work is mainly descriptive with an uncritical acceptance of information, and unsubstantiated opinions may be evident; Lack of logical development of an argument;

· Shows a limited understanding of the application of research-informed literature or attempt to apply knowledge across situations; Responses may not be meaningful;

· Structure is weak and/or inconsistent and lacking in sequential development; Mistakes in grammar or syntax; Immature style; Citations and bibliography poorly or inconsistently presented; Demonstrates few qualities and transferable skills required for employment;

· Some evidence of ability to collect appropriate data/ information and undertake straightforward research tasks with external guidance;

· Can communicate in a range of formats, including orally, appropriate to the discipline(s), but with evident weaknesses;

· Can work effectively with others as a member of a group, and meet most obligations to others (e; g; tutors and peers);

· Able to recognise own strengths and weaknesses in relation to professional and practical skills identified by others, but lacking insight in some areas;

Learning outcomes

  1. Explain fundamental concepts within the study of their chosen discipline, be it History, Archaeology, Religion, Philosophy, or the Social Sciences.

  2. Understand the variety of approaches within the study of their chosen discipline, be it History, Archaeology, Religion, Philosophy, or the Social Sciences.

  3. Demonstrate effective oral communication

  4. Demonstrate effective written communication.

  5. Demonstrate critical thinking and evaluation.

Assessment Methods

Type Name Description Weight
ORAL 5-minute presentation (formative assessment)

Students will deliver a 5-minute oral presentation providing a critique of their selected text. This text may focus on their chosen discipline (either History, Archaeology, Religion, Philosophy or the Social Sciences), or provide an inter-disciplnary view. Presentation to be delivered first, before submission of essay, thereby giving students the opportunity to deliver an oral critique of their chosen text first.

20
ESSAY 1,500 word essay (summative assessment)

Building on the oral presentation assignment, students will write a 1,500 word essay offering a critique of their selected text. This text may focus on their chosen discipline (either History, Archaeology, Religion, Philosophy or the Social Sciences), or provide an inter-disciplnary view.

80

Teaching and Learning Strategy

Hours
Lecture

1-hour weekly lecture

10
Seminar

1-hour weekly seminar

10
Private study

Independent study - reflecting on lectures, preparing for seminars, and researching and writing end of module essay.

180

Transferable skills

  • Literacy - Proficiency in reading and writing through a variety of media
  • Computer Literacy - Proficiency in using a varied range of computer software
  • Self-Management - Able to work unsupervised in an efficient, punctual and structured manner. To examine the outcomes of tasks and events, and judge levels of quality and importance
  • Exploring - Able to investigate, research and consider alternatives
  • Information retrieval - Able to access different and multiple sources of information
  • Inter-personal - Able to question, actively listen, examine given answers and interact sensitevely with others
  • Presentation - Able to clearly present information and explanations to an audience. Through the written or oral mode of communication accurately and concisely.
  • Argument - Able to put forward, debate and justify an opinion or a course of action, with an individual or in a wider group setting
  • Self-awareness & Reflectivity - Having an awareness of your own strengths, weaknesses, aims and objectives. Able to regularly review, evaluate and reflect upon the performance of yourself and others

Subject specific skills

  • producing logical and structured arguments supported by relevant evidence
  • planning, designing, executing and documenting a programme of research, working independently
  • marshalling and critically appraising other people's arguments, including listening and questioning
  • making effective and appropriate use of relevant information technology
  • making critical and effective use of information retrieval skills using paper-based and electronic resources
  • critical evaluation of one's own and others' opinions
  • the ability to undertake and present scholarly work

Resources

Talis Reading list

http://readinglists.bangor.ac.uk/modules/hps-0001.html

Reading list

Please see below suggested reading for students to develop subject specific skills. Please note, the subject specific texts will vary each year, depending on the expertise and interests of the teaching team, and will be introduced to students at the start of the module

R. Barrass, Students Must Write: a Guide to Better Writing in Coursework and Examinations (Abingdon, 2005).

J. Black & D. MacRaild, Studying History (Basingstoke, 1997).

E. Chambers & A. Northedge, The Arts Good Study Guide (Milton Keynes, 1997).

S. Cottrell, The Study Skills Handbook (Basingstoke, 2003).

P. Creme & R. Lea Mary, Writing at University: A Guide for Students, 2nd edition (Buckingham, 2003).

B. Greetham, How to Write Better Essays (Basingstoke, 2001).

B. Kirton & K. MacMillan, Just Write: An Easy-to-use Guide to Writing at University (Abingdon, 2007).

D. McIlroy, Studying at University: How to be a Successful Student (London, 2003).

C. Neville, The Complete Guide to Referencing and Avoiding Plagiarism (Maidenhead, 2007).

A. Northedge, The Good Study Guide (Milton Keynes, 2005).

J. Peck and M. Coyle, The Student’s Guide to Writing: Grammar, Punctuation and Spelling, 2nd edition (Basingstoke, 2005)

P. Redman et al., Good Essay Writing: A Social Sciences Guide (Milton Keynes, 1998).

J. Rose, The Mature Student’s Guide to Writing (Basingstoke, 2001).

Courses including this module