Living in Germany

Local Registration

If you are staying in Germany for longer than 3 months, you must register at your local Einwohnermeldeamt (registration office) within 7 days of your arrival. If you reside in Rheinland-Pfalz, you have to register immediately. Please note that in some places, the Einwohnermeldeamt is known as the Kreisverwaltungsreferat (KVR) or the Bürgerbüro.

When you go along to the Einwohnermeldeamt, you will need your British or EU Passport (if you have a non-EU passport, you may need to also bring your visa documentation), proof of your address (leasing contract etc), proof of insurance (EHIC card or proof of private health insurance; proof of Bangor Insurance etc.) and proof of your work or study placement (work contract or proof of matriculation i.e. Zulassungsbescheid); you may also be asked to provide proof that you can support yourself while you are abroad. The documents required can differ from area to area. In some places, you may be required to pay a small fee or provide passport photos. For this reason, it is important to check what your local registration office requires before you arrive in Germany (you can do this online). Checking out the website for your local registration office could be very useful, as some not only tell you what documents you will need to bring, they have also posted registration forms online which are available to download – filling these in before you visit the office may help to reduce stress and save you time.

N.B. Please remember to keep your stamped proof of registration safe and don’t forget to de-register before you leave. Also, if you move to a different address in Germany, remember that you must register your new address again at the local Einwohnermeldeamt. Please don’t forget to let us in Bangor know your new address; you can do this by completing the Year Abroad Address form.

Further Information:

Young Germany can offer you important and up-to-date information about settling into life in Germany, see: http://www.young-germany.de/topic/live/settle-in-adjust

For up-to-date information on the main administrative issues British nationals moving to Germany may want to consider before or shortly after they arrive in Germany, see: https://www.gov.uk/living-in-germany

ThirdYearAbroad can also offer you up-to-date information about living in Germany, see: http://www.thirdyearabroad.com/germany.html

Living in Austria

Local Registration

If you intend to stay in Austria for more than three months, you are required to register your address (Meldepflicht) within three days of moving into your new home. This is done at your local registration service (Meldeservice). In Vienna these are located in the 23 district council offices (Magistratische Bezirksämter) and in the federal provinces in your local communal authority offices (Gemeindeamt).

Since 1 January 2006, every person who moved to Austria on or after this date or was born on or after this date needs to approach his local registration authority for a so called “Anmeldebestätigung” or “Anmeldebescheinigung”. Details on the registration process and required documents for the issuance of this registration certificate can be obtained through the respective local registration authority.

N.B. Please remember to keep your stamped proof of registration safe and don’t forget to de-register before you leave. Also, if you move to a different address in Austria, remember that you must register your new address again at the local Meldeamt. Please don’t forget to let us in Bangor know your new address; you can do this by completing the Year Abroad Address form.

For up-to-date information on the main administrative issues British nationals moving to Austria may want to consider before or shortly after they arrive in Austria, see: https://www.gov.uk/living-in-austria

Accommodation in Germany and Austria

Please remember that sorting out accommodation for your stay in Germany and Austria is YOUR responsibility. If you are going abroad as a teaching assistant, your mentor at the school may be able to help you source accommodation in the local area. Universities often offer students the opportunity to apply for accommodation in halls when you are applying for your placement (this is generally organised through the Studentenwerk in Germany or the OEAD in Austria; there are usually application forms and deadlines. When you are offered a place, you generally have to transfer a deposit by a set date to secure the accommodation. If you do not do so, your place will be reassigned to another applicant).

Please remember that the average cost for accommodation varies from a minimum of ca. € 200 (for a single or shared room in a flat or in halls) to approximately € 600 a month for a self-contained flat. These prices are just a rough estimate and might vary from year to year and region to region. Remember that there are two types of rent ‘Warmmiete’ includes bills, while ‘Kaltmiete’ doesn’t. Some rental contracts (particularly in the south-west of Germany) may stipulate that you are responsible for undertaking particular duties in the communal areas of the house such as cleaning the stairwell or sweeping the entrance.

Sharing rooms is quite common amongst students in Germany and Austria and this is often a good way of making friends.

Most universities have an accommodation office where you can find a list of available rooms. These, however, are not always up-to-date so get the details of as many rooms as possible and be prepared to make several telephone calls. University noticeboards may have adverts for rooms available. Local papers are also a useful source of information. However, make sure you buy the paper as soon as it comes out and don’t be put off if people tell you they are not interested.

Always go and see a place before you agree to rent it. While you may want to start looking online before you depart, do not transfer money before you have seen the accommodation.

On your arrival abroad you might want to spend a few days in a hostel while you look for suitable accommodation (if you decide to do this, it is important to arrive early). Here are some useful links:

For Germany:

For Austria:

For further useful information on how to find accommodation in Germany see the following websites:

For further useful information on how to find accommodation in Austria see the following websites:

German Emergency Numbers

  • Police 110
  • Fire Brigade 112
  • Ambulance 115
  • Operator (0180) 2001033
  • National Directory Enquiries 11833
  • National Directory Enquiries (in English) 11837
  • International Directory Enquiries 11834
  • German Youth Hostel Association (05231) 99360
  • Air Ambulance (0711) 70 10 70
  • Emergency Poison Help Line (0761) 192 40

Austrian Emergency Numbers

  • Police 133
  • Fire Brigade 122
  • Ambulance 144
  • Mountain Rescue: 140

Contact

Stefan Baumgarten
s.baumgarten@bangor.ac.uk
(0044) 01248 388291
School of Modern Languages, Bangor University, College Road, BANGOR, Gwynedd, LL57 2DG