Research News: June 2014

£1m EU boost for Marine Centre Wales

Bangor University Vice-Chancellor John G Hughes has welcomed the news that the £23.6m SEACAMS project, which it leads, has been given a £1m EU boost.

SEACAMS is an EU scheme pioneering collaborative research projects in marine science between business and universities delivered by Bangor University in partnership with Aberystwyth and Swansea Universities. The project is helping to develop the coastal marine economy in Wales and has already worked with more than 60 companies on R&D projects ranging from developing new products to studying marine life to determining management strategies for rising sea levels.

Publication date: 26 June 2014

Professor listed among world’s most influential researchers

Professor Jo Rycroft-Malone, Professor of Health Services & Implementation Research at Bangor University’s School of Healthcare Sciences has been ranked among the world’s most influential researchers.

One significant and important measure of academic research is how often academic research papers are cited or referenced in other academic articles. Prof Rycroft-Malone’s work is listed in the newly published Thompson Reuters Highly Cited Researchers 2014 list, which represents the world’s leading scientific minds.

Prof Rycroft-Malone is among over three thousand researchers from across the globe earning the distinction by writing the greatest numbers of reports officially designated by Essential Science Indicators℠ as Highly Cited Papers-ranking among the top 1% most cited for their subject field and year of publication, which has been judged by peers to be of particular significance and earning them the mark of exceptional impact.

Publication date: 26 June 2014

Bangor University scientists take part in world-wide ocean health check

Scientists at Bangor University will be joining forces with marine scientists across the world on 21 June to take part in an ambitious global research project – Ocean Sampling Day.

80% of all life on Earth comes from the World Ocean which covers more than 70% of the Earth surface. Marine microorganisms are responsible for a smooth functioning of global elements’ cycles, however less than 1 % of them are known.  The School of Biological Sciences will join 150 research organisations from Iceland to Anatartica and from Moorea (French Polynesia) to South Africa to study and health check the world’s oceans.

Publication date: 18 June 2014

Bangor University’s Centre for Mindfulness shortlisted for UK Health Award

Bangor University’s Centre for Mindfulness Research and Practice (CMRP) has been shortlisted for a prestigious UK health Award which highlights the people and organisations who have made an outstanding contribution to the advancement of health and wellbeing in the UK.

The Winners of this year’s Bevan Prize for Health and Wellbeing 2014 awarded by the Bevan Foundation and Aneurin Bevan Society, with the generous support of UNISON, the Open University and the Royal College of Midwives, will be announced at an event in London on Tuesday 15 July.

Publication date: 17 June 2014

Cancer Cells do it the “quick-and-dirty way”

The hallmark of cancer is uncontrolled cell growth directed by a cell cycle engine gone into overdrive. The centrepiece of this engine is the enzyme Cdc2 kinase. While Cdc2 kinase is tightly regulated in normal cells, this control is lost in cancer cells.

Cutting-edge research conducted at Bangor University in the North West Cancer Research Institute discovered now that hyperactive Cdc2 kinase not only forces cells into uncontrolled growth but also reprograms the repair of broken chromosomes.

Publication date: 10 June 2014

Identifying the mechanisms that affect changes in snake venoms

Every year, snakebites kill up to 90,000 people, mostly in impoverished, rural tropical areas. This statistic is surprising when one considers that antivenoms are available, however, the truth is that the efficacy of antivenom is largely restricted to the snake species that was used in manufacture, and they are often ineffective in treating snakebite by different, even closely related species.

Writing in PNAS (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United states of America doi.10.1073/pnas. 1405484111) Dr Nicholas Casewell and Wolfgang Wüster of Bangor University  and colleagues identify the mechanisms by which the variations in venom occurs between related snake species and also the significant variations in venom toxicity that occurs as a result.

Publication date: 10 June 2014

What prevents us from standing for the Assembly?

Researchers in Bangor University's College of Business, Law, Education and Social Sciences have been awarded a prestigious research contract by the National Assembly for Wales’ Independent Remuneration Board to identify and research barriers that may inhibit persons from otherwise putting their names forward for election to the Assembly.

Publication date: 5 June 2014