All Research News A–Z

£12m EU backed bio-refining research and innovation project gets the ‘green’ light

A new £12 million investment in Wales’ ‘green’ economy has been announced by Welsh Government Finance and Government Business Minister, Jane Hutt  recently.

Publication date: 14 December 2015

£1.7m National Lottery grant to protect UK’s threatened marine life

The Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) has awarded £1.7million to “Capturing our Coast”, a project designed to explore how the marine environment is responding to global climate change.

The project will train over 3,000 volunteers – making it the largest experimental marine citizen science project ever undertaken in the UK.  The volunteers will collect data around key species and it is hoped the new research will help inform future policy and conservation strategies.

Publication date: 15 June 2015

£1.8m funding for large-scale online resource of contemporary Welsh language

As a leading authority on Welsh language technologies, Bangor University will be participating in a multi-institution project to develop the first mass corpus to capture and inform the past, present and future use of the Welsh language.

Publication date: 13 October 2015

£1.8m funding for major new study into management of bleeding after childbirth

£1.8m funding from the UK National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) has been awarded to run a large study into the drug treatment of bleeding after childbirth (COPE).

Publication date: 21 June 2017

£1m EU boost for Marine Centre Wales

Bangor University Vice-Chancellor John G Hughes has welcomed the news that the £23.6m SEACAMS project, which it leads, has been given a £1m EU boost.

SEACAMS is an EU scheme pioneering collaborative research projects in marine science between business and universities delivered by Bangor University in partnership with Aberystwyth and Swansea Universities. The project is helping to develop the coastal marine economy in Wales and has already worked with more than 60 companies on R&D projects ranging from developing new products to studying marine life to determining management strategies for rising sea levels.

Publication date: 26 June 2014

£1m EU boost for pilot project to exploit behaviour change research for industry

Deputy Minister for European Programmes, Alun Davies, has announced £1m EU funding for a pilot project that will pioneer cutting-edge research to help businesses develop new products, processes or services.

Publication date: 1 February 2013

2014 North Wales Medicines Research Symposium

The Centre for Health Economics and Medicines Evaluation, Royal Pharmaceutical Society and Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board are jointly hosting the 2014 North Wales Medicines Research Symposium at Kinmel Manor Hotel, Abergele on the 4th September (buffet from 6.30pm).

Publication date: 5 August 2014

£36m EU-backed investment in research and innovation for Welsh business

A new £36m EU-backed scheme to develop post-graduate research and innovation skills in partnership with small and medium-sized businesses has been announced by the First Minister of Wales Carwyn Jones.

The Knowledge Economy Skills Scholarships (KESS II) scheme will partner over 500 businesses with academics and postgraduate research students to develop innovative research projects aimed at driving business growth.

Publication date: 24 May 2016

£4.4m EU-backed scheme to boost leadership and management skills in North Wales

A £4.4m EU-backed scheme to help boost leadership and management skills in North Wales has been announced by Finance Secretary Mark Drakeford.    The North Wales Business Academy will support business growth and competitiveness in the region by delivering university-accredited leadership and management qualifications to more than 1,000 employees over the next three years.  A Young Talent Academy will also be set up to develop and retain the next generation of managers in North Wales.

Publication date: 4 August 2016

£4.9 million pounds to train new generation of environmental scientists

Bangor University is poised to train a new generation of environmental scientists equipped to tackle the challenges of a planet under pressure, under a £4.9 million initiative which has been funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC).

Publication date: 6 November 2013

A 400-year-old shark is the latest animal discovery to reveal the secrets of long life

With an estimated lifespan of 400 years, the Greenland shark has just been reported to be the longest-lived vertebrate on the planet. This is only the latest of a series of recent findings that push the boundaries of animal longevity, and it raises the perennial question of what factors enable some animals to achieve what we might call extreme longevity – lifespans that can be measured in centuries.

Publication date: 12 August 2016

A BEACON of light for the green economy

Bangor University is a partner in a newly announced £20m programme to boost the green economy by helping business in West Wales and the Valleys develop new technologies to turn locally grown plant crops into commercial products, announced by Deputy First Minister, Ieuan Wyn Jones AM, at the Senedd. [Tuesday, 15 February).

Publication date: 15 February 2011

A Celebration of Welsh and Chinese literature

Welsh and Chinese authors, poets, translators, academics and publishers came together at Bangor University recently to celebrate a sharing of literature between the two countries, in an event organised by Yan Ying of Bangor University’s School of Modern Languages and Sioned Puw Rowlands of the Wales Literature Exchange.

Publication date: 16 May 2014

A century after the Battle of the Somme, can we finally explain shell shock?

The Battle of the Somme was one of the most bitterly contested and bloodiest battles of World War I. The five-month attritional offensive saw more than a million casualties: on the first day of fighting alone the British Army suffered their largest loss to life of the war.

This article by Leanne K Simpson a PhD candidate at the School of Psychology & Institute of Elite Preformance was originally published on The Conversation. Read theoriginal article.

Publication date: 30 June 2016

Affluent countries contribute less to wildlife conservation than the rest of the world

Some countries are more committed to conservation than others, a new Bangor University research collaboration has found.

In partnership with Panthera, the only organisation dedicated to protecting wild cats, researchers from Bangor University assessed how much, or little, individual countries contribute to protecting the world’s wildlife. By comparison to the more affluent, developed world, biodiversity is a higher priority in poorer areas such as Africa, whose countries contribute more to conservation than any other region.

Publication date: 5 May 2017

A future where ‘smart’ contact lenses could predict your risk of suffering a common cold: Tear fluid antibodies and the common cold

Why is it that there are some people who can go a whole winter without so much as a sniffle, whilst others seem to catch every common cold that comes their way?

A new study from Bangor University’s Extremes Research Group at the School of Sport, Health & Exercise Sciences, showed that it could be possible to predict the likelihood of participants succumbing to common cold symptoms by analyzing the level of antibodies in tear fluid.

Publication date: 16 December 2015

AHRC PhD Studentship in Archaeology

Applications are invited by the Graduate School of Arts and Humanities at Bangor University for an AHRC PhD Studentship in Archaeology beginning on 1st October 2012. 

Publication date: 15 March 2012

AHRC PhD Studentship in Translation Studies

Applications are invited by the Graduate School of Arts and Humanities at Bangor University for an AHRC PhD Studentship in Translation Studies beginning on 1st October 2012.

Publication date: 14 March 2012

Alcohol industry ‘responsible drinking’ messages failing to address the real issues

Alcohol industry campaigns to promote ‘responsible drinking’ have little effect, and may even be counterproductive. That’s one of the key findings of a new Alcohol Concern Cymru report to be launched on Wednesday 12 October, which has been written by researchers from Glyndŵr and Bangor Universities.

Publication date: 12 October 2011

Alliance to strengthen forestry research in Wales

Two organisations with long records of expertise in forestry education and research will be collaborating more closely with the move of Forest Research’s Welsh office to Bangor University’s School of Environment, Natural Resources and Geography, which is the home of forestry in the University.

Publication date: 19 May 2016

All-Wales project to increase technology transfer between Welsh universities and business

 A new initiative to transfer more of Wales’ cutting-edge university research into business to help boost Wales’ economy and build an ‘innovation culture’ has received a funding boost from the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales (HEFCW).

Publication date: 1 February 2013

Almost Half of Depression in Adults starts in adolesence

A new study by research psychologists at Bangor and Oxford Universities show that half of adults who experience clinical depression had their first episode start in adolescence.  In fact, the most common age to see the start of depression is between 13-15 years-old.

Publication date: 28 February 2012

Ambergris: how to tell if you've struck gold with 'whale vomit' or stumbled upon sewage

This article by Vera Thoss, Lecturer in Chemistry, was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

When walking along the beach, some objects might seem unusual because they are neither pebble nor shell nor seaweed. They can be covered with a soft white layer that looks a bit like cotton wool. They may appear hard or waxy, and sometimes have objects trapped within. And a smell that has been described as “a cross between squid and farmyard manure”. Dogs with their keen sense of smell often find these objects first.

Publication date: 15 April 2016

A Mindful Nation

Bangor University’s Centre for Mindfulness Research & Practice has been instrumental in introducing Mindfulness to the UK and in both researching its effectiveness in different settings and in training the practitioners.

An all Party Parliamentary Group, looking at Mindfulness has now launched an interim report, The Mindful Nation UK, urging all parties in the next election to consider how best to include mindfulness in how their parties tackle a mental health crisis.

Publication date: 14 January 2015

A new scientific framework to plan the conservation of dry forests in tropical America

Dry forests in Latin America are amongst the world’s most threatened tropical forests.  Less than 10% of their original extent remains in many countries, much less than many rain forests such as Amazonia that remains approximately 80% intact.  Dry forests were the cradle of pre-Colombian civilisation in Latin America, and the source of globally important crops such as maize, beans, peanuts and tomato, but despite this and their widespread destruction, they have been long-overlooked by scientists and conservationists.

Publication date: 23 September 2016

A new Strategic Alliance working for Wales

Aberystwyth and Bangor Universities will announce a new Strategic Alliance on Wednesday 7th December that signals a new phase in the partnership between the two institutions.

Publication date: 7 December 2011

Are people ‘rolling the dice’ when it comes to food safety?

A new study, conducted by a team of UK based researchers involving The University of Manchester, Bangor University and the University of Liverpool, known as the ENIGMA Project, has revealed the levels of bad behaviours in UK kitchens which increase the public’s risk of getting food poisoning.

Publication date: 29 June 2017

Are you exercising enough to make you sick?

Should you go harder or go longer?

Marathon and endurance races are increasingly popular, as is a new thirst for intense exercise, such as in ‘spike’ or ‘buzz’ intensity training methods and classes. But which is better for you? Or, to put it another way, which will do least damage to your immune system?

New research by Bangor University challenges the current thinking that longer, less strenuous workouts are less harmful to the immune system.

Publication date: 4 December 2014

Arthritis Care and Research (ACR)

SHES staff have provided three out of 18 accepted articles in a special edition of the ACR on 'Muslce and bone in the Rheumatic Diseases'.

Publication date: 12 December 2011

Arthurian Legends take academic home

An academic who fell in love with Arthurian literature while an undergraduate student in Romania is returning to her homeland to present her latest research at an international conference of Arthurian experts from around the world.

Publication date: 10 July 2014

Arthur’s Camelot – possible location is revealed

The quest to find King Arthur’s Camelot has puzzled and intrigued scholars and fans for a thousand years. Now, the search may finally be over.  

A retired Bangor University English Literature Professor has revealed what he believes to be the location of Arthur’s Camelot- and it turns out to be a small Roman fort at Slack, outside Hebden Bridge in west Yorkshire.

Publication date: 15 December 2016

'Arthur: the King that Never Left Us'

Bangor University is celebrating Arthurian Studies at the University by holding a public lecture and exhibition of rare books focusing on this area of study.  Both events mark a donation by Flintshire County Council of a major Arthurian book collection to Bangor University Library and Archives.

Publication date: 31 March 2015

Articles on enhancing ventilation in homes of children with asthma published

Two articles in the British Journal of General Practice are part authored by researchers from Bangor University.

Publication date: 17 January 2012

Artists and architects think differently compared to other people

Architects, painters and sculptors conceive of spaces in different ways from other people and from each other, finds a new study by University College London and Bangor University researchers.

When asked to talk about images of places, painters are more likely to describe the depicted space as a two-dimensional image, while architects are more likely to focus on paths and the boundaries of the space.

Publication date: 28 June 2017

Artists and architects think differently to everyone else – you only have to hear them talk

How often have you thought that somebody talks just like an accountant, or a lawyer, or a teacher? In the case of artists, this goes a long way back. Artists have long been seen as unusual – 

people with a different way of perceiving reality. Famously, the French architect Le Corbusier argued in 1946 that painters, sculptors and architects are equipped with a “feeling of space” in a very fundamental sense.

This article by Thora Tenbrink, Reader in Cognitive Linguistics, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 11 July 2017

A 'sapphire rush' has sent at least 45,000 miners into Madagascar's protected rainforests

This article  by Julia P G Jones, Professor of Conservation Science, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

The rainforests of Didy in eastern Madagascar usually ring with the calls of the indri, the island’s largest lemur. There is a different noise now: the chopping of trees, digging of gravel, and cheers of encouragement from the thousands of illegal miners who have flooded to these forests since sapphires were discovered in late September.

Publication date: 21 November 2016

As cash becomes quaint, are ATMs on path to obsolescence?

An article by Bernardo Batiz-Lazo Professor of Business History and Bank Management at Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation

 

Before the advent of the internet, the greatest gain in customer convenience within retail banking came from the creation of automated teller machines (ATMs).

ATMs led to significant advances in how customers access financial services because – coupled with the direct deposit – they freed workers from so many routine tasks. No more depositing a paycheck in person, inquiring about balances or paying utilities solely during banking hours. ATMs enabled impromptu dinners and last-minute shopping over the weekend.

Publication date: 16 June 2015

As sea ice retreats, will wind stir up Atlantic water heat in the Arctic Ocean?

The Arctic region is warming up at twice the rate as the rest of the planet, and the most obvious symptom of this warming is the retreat of the sea ice that covers the Arctic Ocean.

Publication date: 19 September 2016

As seen on TV

The Extremes Research Group are rapidly gaining recognition for their research into how humans face the challenge of extreme environments.

Publication date: 15 June 2011

Associate Member of The Colclough Centre Invited to Celebration of Best Selling Author's Career

Publication date: 10 May 2017

Austrians are interested in archaeology

As Austria prepares to change the way archaeology is handled, by ratifying the European Convention for the Protection of the Archaeological Heritage (revised), the European framework for national policies and practices of protecting the archaeological heritage, more than 20 years after it came into force  in most of the European Union, Professor Raimund Karl, a leading a leading expert on public engagement and participation in archaeology, has been working with the Austrian government to research Austrian attitudes to archaeology.

Publication date: 1 September 2014

Awards for Bangor University’s research impact

Three research projects which have made outstanding impacts in very different areas have been recognised at Bangor University’s inaugural Research and Enterprise Impact Awards.

Publication date: 12 July 2013

Bangor Academic backs Young Parents.

From headlines on pre-teen fathers to pervasive beliefs about benefit and housing claims, young parenthood has come to be seen as a risk for society. A recent Bangor research study on the ‘Rhieni Ifanc Ni’ project run by GISDA across North West Wales, challenges those views.

The Rhieni Ifanc Ni project provided individual support to over 100 parents aged under 25, most of whom were mothers. Its primary aim was to build parents’ resilience. Aspects of this included promoting economic inclusion through supporting parents to gain relevant qualifications, supporting family and co-parent relationships and enabling parents to form networks with other parents.

Bangor University undertook a year-long study of parents’ experiences of ‘building resilience’.  The study was led by Dr. Myfanwy Davies and was undertaken by Karen Wyn Jones and Elin Williams in the School of Social Sciences.

Publication date: 29 March 2017

Bangor Academic chosen to represent Wales on UK’s Biomedical Sciences representative body

Mr Merfyn Williams, course director of the BSc Biomedical Science degree in the School of Medical Sciences has had the honour of being invited to join the Heads of University Centres of Biomedical Sciences (HUCBMS) Executive Committee. HUCBMS is a representative body for the biomedical sciences in the UK and has a membership of over 60 universities, which includes Bangor University, within the UK and overseas. Its mission isto promote the development and enhancement of biomedical sciences teaching and research’.

Publication date: 22 February 2016

Bangor academic Helena Miguélez-Carballeira wins award to lead research network on translation in Wales

The Project ‘Translation in Non-State Cultures: Perspectives from Wales’ has been awarded an AHRC Research Development Grant. Dr Helena Miguélez-Carballeira, Lecturer in Spanish and Director of the Translation Studies Graduate Programme at Bangor University’s School of Modern Languages has won £12,000 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council to lead a Wales-wide research network on translation in Wales.

Publication date: 15 February 2012

Bangor academics attract grant from the British Academy

The unintended consequences of bank regulatory enforcement actions will come under scrutiny in a new study by Bangor Business School.

Publication date: 11 October 2012

Bangor Academics create impact with BMJ papers

A paper co-authored by a Bangor academic has made the front cover of the prestigious British Medical Journal while another research re-evaluation published by the BMJ, in the same month, received international media attention.

Publication date: 29 September 2015

Bangor archaeology research on early Iceland attracts international attention

Publication date: 20 January 2011

Bangor Business School enters top 15 in the world for banking research

Bangor Business School is now amongst the top 15 institutions in the world for research in the field of Banking (as of October 2013).

Publication date: 7 November 2013

Bangor Business School is UK leader for Banking research

Bangor Business School is the top institution in the UK – and amongst the world’s top 30 – for Banking research, according to recent rankings.

Publication date: 11 September 2012

Bangor helps to beat the bullies

Researchers in the Centre for Evidence-based Intervention (CEBEI), part of the School of Psychology, were the first in the UK to examine the effectiveness of the KiVa anti-bully programme that originated in Finland

Publication date: 15 May 2015

Bangor hosts Welsh Labour Market Summit on Skills and Jobs

Dr. Tony Dobbins (Bangor Business School) and Dr. Alexandra Plows (School of Social Sciences) organized a Welsh Labour Market Summit on Skills and Employment at Bangor University on Friday September 18th.

The Labour Market Summit was a knowledge exchange event to promote research impact. It attracted a mixed audience of policy-makers, labour market practitioners, employer representatives, trade unionists, careers advisors, and academics.

Publication date: 21 September 2015

Bangor ICPS to help the EU implement the Small Business Act following major grant success

Bangor Law School’s Institute for Competition & Procurement Studies (ICPS) has recently been notified of a major grant success under the European Union’s COSME fund – a funding programme designed to raise competitiveness of small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) in the EU and to help the EU implement the requirements of the Small Business Act (the overarching framework for EU policy on SMEs).

Publication date: 27 January 2017

Bangor Institute for Health and Medical Research Launch

Bangor University is launching the new Institute of Health and Medical Research on Thursday February 25th 2016.

Building on an established foundation of research excellence, the new Bangor Institute for Health and Medical Research (BIHMR) will facilitate more interdisciplinary research that spans discovery in the laboratory through to research that solves complex health problems in the real world. In this way, BIHMR will contribute to improvements in local health and healthcare, as well as making an impact across Wales, the United Kingdom and internationally.

Publication date: 22 February 2016

Bangor in the Indian Ocean

Marine biologists from Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences have recently returned from a science and conservation expedition to the British Indian Ocean Territory, currently the world’s largest Marine Reserve, located 7° south of the equator, below the Maldives.   

Publication date: 2 June 2015

Bangor Law School’s Institute for Competition & Procurement Studies nominated for two prestigious Impact Awards

Bangor University Law School’s Institute for Competition & Procurement Studies (ICPS) has once again been shortlisted as a finalist for the prestigious Bangor University Impact and Innovation Awards.

Publication date: 25 July 2014

Bangor led project covered by Science

A Bangor- Unversity led European Union funded research project developing techniques to assist in the fight against illegal fishing and to preserve fish stocks is covered in the Magazine Science.

Publication date: 17 December 2010

Bangor Physical Oceanographers score a million pound hat-trick!

Physical Oceanographers from Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences have recently won three research grants from the Natural Environment Research Council, one of the bodies which funds UK research. Together, the research grants bring a million pounds’ worth of new research to be conducted by the University.

Publication date: 19 July 2011

Bangor Pontifical on the Web: Phase One Complete

The Bangor Pontifical Project, launched exactly one year ago as a partnership between the University and the Cathedral to ensure the long-term preservation of Bangor’s most precious medieval manuscript, has just reached its first significant milestone. Completion of phase one, funded by a Welsh Assembly grant, has enabled conservation and rebinding of the Pontifical and digitization of its 340 pages. The manuscript was photographed by the cutting-edge Digital Image Archive of Medieval Music (DIAMM) last spring, and viewers may now zoom in on the excellent high-quality images via the open access Bangor Pontifical Project website.

Publication date: 20 October 2010

Bangor Professor appointed to UK Research Council’s Science Board

Professor David Thomas, Head of the School of Ocean Sciences at Bangor University, has been appointed to the Science Board of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), the UK's largest funder of independent environmental science, training and innovation, delivered through universities and research centres.

Publication date: 27 October 2016

Bangor Psychology Students 'Pitch' up just short after fantastic effort in Cardiff

Two teams of Consumer Psychology masters students went to Cardiff  recently to participate in the Chartered Institute of Marketing's "Pitch" competition. The teams were: "The Three Marketeers" (Jamie Muir, Will Morgan, Manuel Calatrava Conesa) and "The National Thrust" (James Gudgeon, James Gillespie, Bryan Walls).

Publication date: 6 March 2013

Bangor Psychology to play major role in £1.1M MRC research relating to addiction and mania

The School of Psychology at Bangor University is to conduct research into new pharmacological treatment for psychiatric illnesses. Researchers at Bangor and Oxford Universities, and the University of British Columbia, have been funded by the Medical Research Council to evaluate the potential of a new drug to reduce the impulsive behaviours associated with alcohol and drug addictions, as well as mania.

Publication date: 6 March 2014

Bangor Researcher joint winner of the BBC NewsHACK award

Dewi Bryn Jones from the Language Technologies Unit at Canolfan Bedwyr was one of the winners of the Audience Facing award at the BBC’s #newsHack: Language Technology, together with BBC Cymru Fyw, BBC Connected Studio, and BBC Digital in London on the 15 and 16 March 2016. The challenge at the event organised by the BBC News Labs was how to help improve journalism in a multilingual environment in order to take advantage of news and information in other languages, and read content in a number of different languages.  

Publication date: 22 March 2016

Bangor researchers & students plan to get to the bottom of how new fish species are evolving in a Tanzanian crater lake

Charles Darwin called it the mystery of mysteries: how do new species arise? We understand a lot more now than we did in Darwin’s time, of course. But only with the advent of cheap large-scale DNA sequencing have we had a hope to understand how the process works at the most fundamental level.

Professor George Turner from Bangor University has been awarded a £250k grant from the Leverhulme Trust to study fishes from a tiny lake formed in a volcanic crater in Tanzania.

Publication date: 23 October 2014

Bangor’s Battle against Ovarian Cancer

Saturday, 4th of February marks World Cancer Day. Scientists at the Northwest Cancer Research Fund Institute at Bangor University, Dr Ramsay McFarlane and Professor Nick Stuart, are currently using state of the art technologies to identify novel cancer markers in patient ovarian tumour samples.

Publication date: 1 February 2012

Bangor science project shortlisted for EU award

BREAD4PLA, a green science and technology project in which Bangor University’s research played a significant role, has been shortlisted as one of the best 25 LIFE Environment Projects delivered in 2015.

Publication date: 20 May 2016

Bangor science project wins EU award

BREAD4PLA, a green science and technology project in which Bangor University’s research played a significant role, has been awarded one of the two ''Green Awards'' as one of the best LIFE Environment Projects of the last 25 years.

Publication date: 19 June 2017

Bangor scientists contribute to efforts to reduce environmental destruction and poverty in Madagascar

Bangor University is leading research investigating how poverty is closely tied to the state of the environment in countries such as Madagascar. The research project which aims to help understand the linkages between poverty and the destruction of tropical rainforest brings together scientists from Madagascar, the UK, the USA and the Netherlands.

Publication date: 26 November 2013

Bangor scientists contribute to global conservation review.

Conservation scientists at Bangor University have contributed data to the latest comprehensive conservation assessment of the world’s vertebrates.

Publication date: 28 October 2010

Bangor scientist to help protect Marine Biodiversity in the Caribbean

The School of Ocean Sciences collaborating with the Government of the Cayman Islands and US partner The Nature Conservancy have launched an £817,000 project to protect the marine biodiversity of the Cayman Islands, a UK Overseas Territory in the central Caribbean. 

Publication date: 28 October 2010

Bangor Scientist to Strengthen the World’s Largest Marine Reserve

Expertise from Bangor University’s world renowned School of Ocean Science is to contribute towards monitoring and surveying the world’s largest marine reserve, which surrounds a string of tiny islands in the British Indian Ocean Territory of the Chagos Archipelago.

Publication date: 7 March 2012

Bangor’s expertise in ‘world-changing’ technology

An area of  research in which Bangor University is a world leader, is described by this month’s (December) issue of Scientific American as one of ten ‘world-changing ideas’.

Publication date: 16 December 2011

Bangor’s Sports Psychology expertise in demand in Malaysia

Prof. Nicky Callow from Bangor’s School of Sports Science has been invited to the University of Malaya (UM) in Kuala Lumpur as part of their prestigious visiting professorship scheme where renowned academics from around the world present workshops and seminars at the university.

Publication date: 12 February 2016

Bangor team in Marine Parks review in the Caribbean

A team from Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences have been busy in the Cayman Islands in the Caribbean, consulting the public on marine protection to help plan Marine Parks for the future.

Publication date: 28 September 2011

Bangor Uni’s Food Dudes Scheme extended in Wolverhampton

Wolverhampton City NHS Primary Care Trust, who have pioneered UK use of the Food Dudes scheme to encourage schoolchildren to eat more fruit and vegetables, have decided to continue for a further two years.  

 

The Scheme, developed by Bangor University’s Food and Activity Research Unit at the School of Psychology, was introduced in Wolverhampton in January 2009 and initially planned to run it until December 2011 - benefitting 20,000 pupils at primary and special schools – at a total cost of £500,000.

Publication date: 14 December 2010

Bangor University and Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics sign up to future collaborations

Bangor University and Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics have signed a formal Memorandum of Understanding which will enable both organisations to work more closely together in future years. 

Publication date: 14 May 2015

Bangor University and Waitrose branch out into green packaging

A collaborative project led by the BioComposites Centre at Bangor University, in partnership  with Aberystwyth University and Waitrose was on show at the Waitrose Menai Bridge store  recently.

Publication date: 20 November 2014

Bangor University announces third year of expansion of Postgraduate Research Scholarships

New Research Scholarship places are being offered at Bangor University for the third successive year. The places are part of the University's five year post-graduate expansion programme. They were also created to mark the University’s 125th Anniversary in 2009.

"A strong postgraduate community is an essential element of any international research-led university. As well as contributing to the further growth of our already vibrant postgraduate community, over half the Scholarship students will work on projects that will assist businesses working in key sectors of the Welsh economy. This will enable them to access the expertise that exists within the University to develop their businesses,” said Professor John G. Hughes, the University's Vice-Chancellor.

Publication date: 11 March 2011

Bangor University assists development of 'dementia-friendly' church groups

Five groups of churches across North and Mid Wales have been allocated funding to develop dementia-friendly community projects and work towards becoming “dementia friendly”.

The funding comes from Bangor University’s ESRC Impact Acceleration Account (IAA)* and has been awarded to Professor Bob Woods and Revd Dr Bob Friedrich. It follows a conference at Llangollen Pavilion where 78 delegates from Welsh churches gathered to hear how to create Dementia Friendly Churches.

Publication date: 19 May 2017

Bangor University begins research in Virtual Joint Centres with Brazil and China to improve nitrogen use in agriculture

Agriculture faces a pressing problem: the need to provide food security for a burgeoning population whilst safeguarding the environment. Whilst the use of fertiliser nitrogen has helped in increasing food production, this has been at the expense of the environment, especially in rapidly developing countries such as China and Brazil.

Publication date: 3 June 2016

Bangor University brings significant European research funding to north Wales

Research funding worth nearing £10 million has been levied by Bangor University researchers from the European Union research funding programme, and the University expects to improve on this results in the new European research and innovation programme.

Forty-two major pan-European research projects led by Bangor University academics were successfully funded, against stiff competition in FP7, the 7th Research Framework Programme of the European Commission, which ran from 2007 to 2013.

Publication date: 10 December 2014

Bangor University contributes to ‘Buildings as Power Stations’ technology

Bangor University’s School of Chemistry is contributing to a research project which could put Wales at the forefront of global renewable energy technology.

Publication date: 12 November 2012

Bangor University contributes to new PRIME Centre Wales for primary and emergency care research

Bangor University, alongside partner universities Cardiff, Swansea, and South Wales, has been awarded £3.6M for the ‘PRIME Centre Wales’ for Primary and Emergency Care Research.

The funding from Health and Care Research Wales will support PRIME Centre Wales  to improve the health and well-being of people in Wales and internationally, by conducting high quality research on topics of national policy priority in primary, emergency and unscheduled care.

Publication date: 30 June 2015

Bangor University group return from Himalayan expedition

Academics from Bangor University have recently returned from an expedition to the Himalayas as part of a research project to investigate altitude related illness.

Publication date: 4 June 2015

Bangor University helps government of Madagascar develop a strategy to tackle bushmeat hunting

Bushmeat hunting - the hunting of wild animals for food, is recognised as a major conservation issue across much of the tropics. However until recently the threat this poses to Madagascar’s wildlife, including its famous lemurs, was not wildly recognised. Following three years of research by Bangor University with the Malagasy NGO Madagasikara Voakajy (funded by the UK government’s Darwin Initiative), there is now much more information on the extent of this problem and how it could be tackled.

Publication date: 29 May 2012

Bangor University hosts its first Polar Symposium

A ‘Polar Symposium’ being held this week-end (Saturday 8 December) is the first of its kind to be held at Bangor University.

The 'Bangor Polar Symposium' at the School of Ocean Sciences has been jointly organized by the UK Polar Network and the Endeavour Society, a Bangor University student society focussing on ocean sciences.

Publication date: 7 December 2012

Bangor University project aims to enhance NHS services

A new £300,000 project aims to ensure that NHS decisions about patient-focused services will be informed by greater in-depth feedback from patients.

The two-year project will improve the way researchers use existing qualitative research on health services, to increase the likelihood that it will be used by NHS decision-makers.

Publication date: 28 September 2015

Bangor University ranked 7th in the UK for Agri-tech research

Bangor University was ranked 7th in the UK, and 1st in Wales, for the impact of its agri-tech research publications in the recent landmark review for the UK Government, “Encouraging a British Invention Revolution: Sir Andrew Witty’s Review of Universities and Growth”.

Publication date: 5 February 2014

Bangor University recognised for world-leading research

Bangor University’s research has a major impact around the world according to a national assessment of research quality (REF) published today.

Publication date: 18 December 2014

Bangor University Research Excellence Awards 2016

Bangor University is to highlight and celebrate the high standard of research at the University in a new Research Excellence Awards event to be held for the first time this December, and has just announced the Awards Shortlists.

The inaugural Awards will shine a spotlight on some of the University’s outstanding research teams and individuals.

The winners will be announced at an Awards dinner in Pontio on 5th December 2016.

Publication date: 26 October 2016

Bangor University research features on HORIZON

A research project running at Bangor University, with vital input from members of  communities across north Wales, features in the next BBC 2 science documentary programme Horizon (11 May 2016 BBC 2 8.00).

Publication date: 5 May 2016

Bangor University research into access to rare disease medicines

New research from Bangor University, shows that patients with rare diseases often experience a challenging journey that poses difficulties for the National Health Service. Researchers at the University's Centre of Health Economics and Medicines Evaluation at the University's School of Healthcare Sciencesfound that patients often face difficulties in diagnosing their condition, accessing specialist care, and having effective treatment available.

Publication date: 12 November 2015

Bangor University research is set to assist newly protected species

We know that trade and transport of ivory is strictly controlled to safeguard the elephants, and that other animal by-products such as the use of rhino horn is also controlled in an attempt to clamp down on the poaching and illegal trade which affects some of our most threatened species.

The list extends beyond those charismatic species that we’re probably all familiar with.

The organisation responsible for regulating and monitoring trade in wildlife products is the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), to which 183 countries are signatories.

Another group of species, the devil rays, has now joined that list following a recent CITES meeting, and as of today (4 April 2017) the new regulations will be implemented. One Bangor University student is to play a part in the safeguarding of the devil ray and the already protected manta ray.

Publication date: 4 April 2017

Bangor University rewards outstanding impact from its research and enterprise activities

Projects which have benefited local and global communities were rewarded as Bangor University held its third annual Impact and Innovation Awards on the 3rd December 2015.

Publication date: 4 December 2015

Bangor University rewards staff for achieving Research Excellence

A new Research Excellence Awards event has just been held at Bangor University to celebrate the high standard of research at the University.

Publication date: 6 December 2016

Bangor University’s Centre for Mindfulness shortlisted for UK Health Award

Bangor University’s Centre for Mindfulness Research and Practice (CMRP) has been shortlisted for a prestigious UK health Award which highlights the people and organisations who have made an outstanding contribution to the advancement of health and wellbeing in the UK.

The Winners of this year’s Bevan Prize for Health and Wellbeing 2014 awarded by the Bevan Foundation and Aneurin Bevan Society, with the generous support of UNISON, the Open University and the Royal College of Midwives, will be announced at an event in London on Tuesday 15 July.

Publication date: 17 June 2014

Bangor University scientists take part in world-wide ocean health check

Scientists at Bangor University will be joining forces with marine scientists across the world on 21 June to take part in an ambitious global research project – Ocean Sampling Day.

80% of all life on Earth comes from the World Ocean which covers more than 70% of the Earth surface. Marine microorganisms are responsible for a smooth functioning of global elements’ cycles, however less than 1 % of them are known.  The School of Biological Sciences will join 150 research organisations from Iceland to Anatartica and from Moorea (French Polynesia) to South Africa to study and health check the world’s oceans.

Publication date: 18 June 2014

Bangor University shows knowledge can travel from children to adults

A new study by Bangor scientists shows that environmental education can positively influence the knowledge and attitudes of children.  The paper, published in the journal Animal Conservation, also shows that knowledge gained by children about lemur conservation can be transferred to their parents

Publication date: 14 August 2014

Bangor University’s part in the world’s largest Marine Reserve

Bangor University is playing a significant role in the management of the world’s largest marine reserve.

Publication date: 18 December 2015

Bangor University’s School of Environment, Natural Resources and Geography is contributing to reclaiming and transforming degraded land in Indonesia

In a partnership between Universities and commercial organisations both in Indonesia and the UK, Bangor University has been successful in securing a £10,000 grant from the British Council Indonesia to seed-fund research projects that will help return disused former mining sites into productive land.

Publication date: 24 April 2014

Bangor University strengthens research links with Brazil

After signing a research co-operation agreement with the São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP) in June 2012, making Bangor the first Welsh University to establish a research partnership with FAPESP, Bangor University is pleased to announce the first research projects funded under the co-operation programme.

Publication date: 2 August 2013

Bangor University subjects join elite in world table

Newly published analysis of the latest influential QS World University Rankings, which saw Bangor University soar to 411th position worldwide, now provides further information on rankings for different subject areas among the world’s best universities.

Six subjects and one subject area taught at Bangor University feature among the world’s elite universities in this year’s release of the QS World University Rankings by Subject, with Agriculture and Forestry appearing in the top 100 institutions worldwide who teach the subject and rising from among last year’s 200 top Universities.

Publication date: 8 March 2017

Bangor University subjects make the grade in world table

Newly published analysis of the 2016 edition of the influential QS World University Rankings, which saw Bangor University soar 60 places to 411th position worldwide, now provides further information on rankings for different subject areas among the world’s best universities.

Publication date: 23 March 2016

Bangor University teams up with the Ellen MacArthur Foundation

Bangor University, via its BioComposites Centre, has been accepted as a ‘network university’ by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, a charity dedicated to promoting the idea of a ‘circular economy’.

Publication date: 26 July 2016

Bangor University to assist in training future soil scientists

Bangor University is to play a crucial role in training scientists of the future who will improve our understanding of soils, which are key to tackling many of today’s global challenges, including food, water and energy security.

Publication date: 14 October 2014

Bangor University to lead £1.2 million Dementia and visual Arts project

Bangor University is to lead one of a number of projects that will see university researchers, community groups and national charities and trusts working together to explore community health and wellbeing, community engagement and mobilisation.  The University has been awarded a Large Grant in the Cultures, Health & Well-Being theme, one of five Connected Communities Programme themes which share funding in excess of £7m.

Publication date: 14 March 2013

Bangor University to lead multi million pound Europe-wide project to study the history of our seas

The history of the European marine environment during the past thousand years is the target of a €3.1 million (£2.6 million) project, funded by the European Union and led by scientists from School of Ocean Sciences at Bangor University.  The project, which also involves researchers from Norway, Germany, France, Croatia, Portugal and the Netherlands, will use the shells of very long-lived molluscs as a record of environmental change over the past thousand years.  It builds on research originally developed at Bangor by Professor James Scourse and Professor Chris Richardson that led in 2007 to the discovery of the longest-lived animal known to science – a clam from Iceland that had lived for 507 years.

Publication date: 24 September 2013

Bangor University to reward outstanding impact from its research and enterprise activities

Twelve projects at Bangor University have been shortlisted for the University’s third annual Impact and Innovation Awards 2015, supported by Santander Universities.

These prestigious awards at Bangor University recognise and celebrate the recent impact that the University’s research, innovation and enterprise activities have on the wider economy and society. This year, the University is also introducing a new award category, Outstanding Contribution to Wales, to recognise activities that have led to impact of national significance in Wales.

Publication date: 27 November 2015

Bangor University to work with clinical academics in South India to prevent deaths by suicide

A social psychiatrist from  the University's School of Social Sciences is leading a team of psychiatrists and social scientists to work with colleagues in South India to prevent deaths by suicide.

Publication date: 21 August 2015

Bangor University welcomes latest Sustainable Fisheries Accreditation

Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences has welcomed the news that the fishery producing Manx Queenies, the Isle of Man’s queen scallops, has been awarded a sustainability certification under the Marine Stewardship Council programme. 

Experts in sustainable fisheries at the School have worked with the Isle of Man  (IOM) Government’s Department of Environment Food and Agriculture since 2006, to advise them how to manage the fishery sustainably.

Publication date: 19 May 2011

Bangor University welcomes new £17m project to grow world-class scientific research in Wales

Economy and Science Minister, Edwina Hart, has today (Wednesday, 9 September) announced more than £17m funding to bring up to 90 new research fellows from across Europe to grow Wales’ world class scientific research.

Beating off competition from across Europe, the Welsh Government has secured £7m from the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions COFUND scheme, which is part of the EU Horizon 2020 programme. The Welsh Government, in partnership with Welsh Universities, will provide £10m match-funding and these fellows will work with the best researchers in Wales based at Cardiff, Swansea, Aberystwyth and Bangor Universities, as well as the University of South Wales.

Publication date: 9 September 2015

Bangor University Words/Music researchers involved in two events in central London

Lecturer in French Dr Helen Abbott and Honorary Research Fellow in French pianist Sholto Kynoch co-presented a session on their ongoing research collaboration looking at the performance of French song recently.

Publication date: 19 May 2011

BEACON Wales is co-founder of new alliance launched to support the growth of the UK bioeconomy

Bangor University is delighted to be part of a new UK alliance – BioPilotsUK, launched to support the growth of the UK bioeconomy.

The University’s BioComposites Centre is a partner in the award-winning BEACON Wales project, itself one of five established R&D centres across the UK coming together to form the new alliance. This alliance will seek to position Britain as a global leader in biorefining technology development and bio-based product manufacture – two key elements of the bioeconomy.

Publication date: 18 October 2016

BEACON wins prestigious European Commission RegioStars award

A prestigious European Commission RegioStars Award 2014 has been won by the BEACON Biorefining Centre of Excellence, an innovative Welsh research partnership dedicated to developing industrial products from plants to reduce reliance on fossil-based resources such as coal and gas.

Publication date: 31 March 2014

Bilingualism and ageing

Many older people keep mentally active and enjoy using ‘brain training’ puzzles and games for their leisure, however the science on their efficacy is as yet partial and inconclusive.

Another area which is as yet, still not fully understood and has also resulted in conflicting results, is whether being bilingual offers a protective factor in age-related conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease.   

A small-scale study of bilingual Welsh/English speakers funded by the Economic & Social Research Council, was led by Prof Linda Clare of Bangor University’s School of Psychology. At the outset of the research, there was no evidence available about the effects of bilingualism for older Welsh speakers. The now completed study has found no evidence for a significant delay in the onset of Alzheimer’s Disease in Welsh/English bilinguals. This finding was comparable to that in Montreal, Canada where no bilingual advantage was found in non-immigrant bilinguals.

Publication date: 8 December 2014

Bilingual people take greater risks when feedback is given in their native language

Recent research from Bangor University has revealed that Chinese-English bilingual individuals take more risk in gambling when feedback is given to them in Chinese, their native language, than in English, their second language.

Publication date: 15 April 2015

Bilingual Prescription labels can now be introduced

A Welsh language or bilingual service is vital for the welfare of Welsh speaking patients, according to an enquiry by the Welsh Language Commissioner.  A recommendation endorsed by the Chief Pharmaceutical Officer for Wales is for bilingual labels on prescription medicines to be made available to patients.

A team comprising language specialists and pharmacists at Bangor University and Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board has made the first step by translating 30 cautionary instructions given to patients on prescription medicines.

Publication date: 24 February 2016

Bio-economy innovation recognised

The BEACON Bio-refining Centre of Excellence, an innovative research centre dedicated to developing industrial products from plants to reduce reliance on fossil-based resources such as coal and gas, has been shortlisted for the European Commission’s RegioStarts Awards 2014.

Publication date: 2 September 2013

Biotechnology for green Pesticides

Bangor University in conjunction with Almac Group and Hockley International have been awarded a grant to develop an organic natural based pesticide. The work will be carried out at the University’s College of Natural Sciences (CNS) and Almac’s laboratories based in Northern Ireland commencing in September.

Publication date: 22 July 2014

Bird-brained? Not at all: Reed Warblers reveal a magnetic map

We all marvel at those mammals, birds and insects who migrate long distances, and at their innate ability to reach a destination thousands of miles away.

Scientists are still trying to unravel all the mechanisms involved. Now, one group of scientists believe that they have revealed one system being used by some migrating birds, and it reveals a fascinating ‘world-map’ that many of us would marvel at.

Publication date: 17 August 2017

Bloomageddon: seven clever ways bluebells win the woodland turf war

The appearance of vivid bluebell carpets in British woodlands is a sure and spectacular sign of spring. Bluebells – Hyacinthoides non-scripta (L.) Chouard ex Rothm – are Britain’s favourite wildflower and particularly fine carpets attract visitors to well-known sites such as Kew Gardens in London and Coed Cefn in Powys, Wales.

This article by Vera Thoss, Lecturer in Chemistry, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article

Publication date: 10 April 2017

Bowel, oesophageal and pancreatic cancers show biggest improvement in diagnosis time

NEW research shows that bowel, oesophageal and pancreatic cancers have seen the greatest improvement in the time it takes from when a patient first visits their GP with symptoms to when they are diagnosed with the disease.

Publication date: 16 November 2011

Brexit and Britpop: Europeans have stronger cultural links to the UK thanks to English language music

As the European referendum campaigners try to outdo each other with spectacular claims and counterclaims about the risks and benefits of remaining in or leaving the EU, what has become clear is that it is not just the Tory party that is deeply divided on the issue, but Britain as a whole.

The ambivalence is even part of the “in” rhetoric, with statements frequently prefaced by assurances that the politician is “no lover of European bureaucracy” or some such qualification. And there are suspicions that even at the top there is a lack of wholehearted support for the European project, with both Jeremy Corbyn and David Cameron having been accused of previously tending towards Euroscepticism.

Publication date: 13 June 2016

Brexit's impact on farming policy will take Britain back to the 1920s – but that's not necessarily a bad thing

Not much regarding Brexit is clear. But one thing we do know is that the UK’s decision to leave the EU has triggered proposals to implement the most significant changes to agricultural policy since it joined the European Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) in 1973.

This article by David Arnott, PhD Researcher at the School of Environment, Natural Resources & Geography Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 3 July 2017

Bringing up children in a bilingual community

Approximately 70% of the population in Gwynedd, the stronghold of the Welsh language, report that they speak Welsh. Many parents who themselves grew up speaking Welsh, and also many who grew up speaking only English, are bringing up their children as bilinguals. And most children begin their schooling in Gwynedd through the medium of Welsh.

Publication date: 1 December 2011

British gardeners can now grow really tasty, outdoor-grown tomatoes

From next year, British gardeners will be able to buy blight- resistant tomato plants that will grow outside. Developed in conjunction with Bangor University, the tomatoes are far better than any previously available.

Publication date: 16 December 2014

British power stations are burning wood from US forests – to meet renewables targets

Last year, 6m tonnes of “wood pellets” harvested from forests in Louisiana, Georgia, Florida, Alabama and Virginia were shipped across the Atlantic, to be burnt in renewable “biomass” power plants. This was almost double the 2013 figure – the US “wood pellet” industry is booming.

This article by David Styles, Lecturer in Carbon Footprinting, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 19 February 2016

British women will soon be able to serve on the military frontline – but are they ready to fight?

At last, a ban that has long restricted women’s roles within the British military is to be lifted. For years, sceptics and fearmongers have influenced policy and public opinion in the UK preventing women from serving in ground close combat roles, “where the primary role is to close with and kill the enemy”; stopping female soldiers from joining the Royal Marines, RAF Regiment, infantry and armoured regiments.

This article by Leanne K Simpson, PhD candidate at in the Schools of Psychology and Sport, Health & Exercise Sciences Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article

Publication date: 11 July 2016

Britons see volunteering as a hobby or a way to network rather than a chore

Despite the UK being named Europe’s most generous country last year, new data from the Office for National statistics has shown that volunteering for charities and other organisations in the country declined by 7% in the three years to 2015. Furthermore, over the past decade there has been a 15.4% fall in the total number of regular hours dedicated to volunteering, dropping from to 2.28 billion from 1.93 billion hours.

This, according to the Office for National Statistics, resulted in a loss of more than £1 billion between 2012 and 2015.

This downturn doesn’t show the whole picture, however: the ONS also found that more young people are getting involved with volunteering initiatives. And that though the amount of time spent volunteering has declined, more people are signing up to volunteer.

This article by Stephanie Jones, PhD student of sociology, studying civil society, volunteering and participation, at the School of Social Sciences Bangor University, was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 24 March 2017

Calling the future research leaders and innovators of Wales - Welsh Crucible 2012

The Welsh Crucible is a prestigious professional and leadership development programme for the future research leaders of Wales. 

What is Welsh Crucible?

Funded by the St David’s Day group of higher education institutions, Welsh Crucible will bring together thirty researchers to explore how they can work together to tackle the current research challenges facing Wales.
Welsh Crucible 2012 will take place over three intensive two-day (residential) workshops comprising inspiring guest speakers, seminars, skills sessions and informal discussions.

Publication date: 2 February 2012

Can applying messages to cigarettes dissuade us from smoking?

Two academics from Bangor University’s renowned Business School have been applying their knowledge of marketing and managerial studies to investigate a new medium for getting the no-smoking message across- the cigarette itself.

Publication date: 22 December 2013

Cancer Cells do it the “quick-and-dirty way”

The hallmark of cancer is uncontrolled cell growth directed by a cell cycle engine gone into overdrive. The centrepiece of this engine is the enzyme Cdc2 kinase. While Cdc2 kinase is tightly regulated in normal cells, this control is lost in cancer cells.

Cutting-edge research conducted at Bangor University in the North West Cancer Research Institute discovered now that hyperactive Cdc2 kinase not only forces cells into uncontrolled growth but also reprograms the repair of broken chromosomes.

Publication date: 10 June 2014

Cancer experts gather for Bangor Conference

On Wednesday and Thursday this week (23/24/11/11), delegates from across the UK will be gathering at Bangor University for the second conference exploring how services for patients with cancer can be provided in a rural environment.

Publication date: 23 November 2011

Cancer patients diagnosed more quickly

THE TIME taken to diagnose some of the more common cancers – from the point when a patient first reports a possible symptom to their general practitioner (GP) – fell in adults by an average of five days in just under a decade, according to research* published in the British Journal of Cancer, today (Wednesday 5 February 2014).

Publication date: 5 February 2014

Cancer research in Wales gets £200k boost for World Cancer Day

A research project which will look at the way in which cancer cells grow and divide has been given a boost of £200,000 thanks to North West Cancer Research.

The money will fund a three-year research project based at the North West Cancer Research Institute at Bangor University.

Publication date: 3 February 2017

“Can earlier symptomatic diagnosis improve cancer outcomes in Wales”

A report prepared for Public Health Wales by Bangor University makes recommendations for improving cancer outcomes in Wales.

The report, “Can earlier  symptomatic diagnosis improve cancer outcomes in Wales” is written by Professor Richard Neal of the University’s North Wales Centre for Primary Care Research  has been launched at a Conference in Manchester (14 June): Cancer Data and Outcomes Conference 2016: Using data to drive services. Professor Neal is a general practitioner and a leading authority on improving GPs cancer detection rates.

Publication date: 15 June 2016

Can efforts to conserve biodiversity by big industry help or harm local people?

When a large industrial development, such as a mine, is going to have an unavoidable impact on biodiversity, the company may invest in protecting (or even creating) habitat elsewhere to compensate

Publication date: 4 January 2017

Can environmental documentaries make waves?

Trump’s first 100 days in office were, among other things, marked by a climate march in Washington DC that attracted tens of thousands of demonstrators. No surprises there. Since the beginning of his mandate in January, Trump has signed orders to roll back the number of federally protected waterways, restart the construction of contentious oil pipeline, and cut the budget from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Among the various orders and memoranda, the one signed to overhaul Obama’s Clean Power Plan is probably the most remarkable, along with promoting coal extractions all over the US.

This article by Michela Cortese, Associate Lecturer, School of Creative Studies & MediaBangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 5 May 2017

Can Kiefer Sutherland be US president, please?

This article by Gregory Frame, Lecturer in Film Studies Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

To many, the 2016 campaign for the US presidency has been dispiriting and miserable, featuring the two most unpopular candidates in history. Thanks to the fascistic buffoonery of Donald Trump, it has been characterised by a tone that has swung wildly from facetious to obnoxious to disgraceful and back again.

Publication date: 24 October 2016

Can ‘lay carers’ help more at the end of life?

Most people in the UK who are dying would prefer to be looked after at home.  Health care professionals try to enable this to happen.  A new research project led by Bangor University is investigating one way to make this a reality for more people.

Home care is usually provided by District Nurses, working with many other team members including general practitioners, hospice doctors and nurses, and Macmillan or Marie Curie services.  Family members are taught how to care for their loved one, and generally call a District Nurse if there are difficult symptoms.  As people get weaker in the last few weeks or days of life, they become unable to swallow.  At this point, a syringe driver is set up to give medicines under the skin over 24 hours.  While this often relieves most symptoms, some symptoms may break through and need extra doses of medication (called ‘breakthrough’ symptoms).   Then, the family usually call in the district nurse who can give extra doses of medicine as injections.  But, this can take a long time, often more than an hour.  The wait can be distressing for the patient and their carers, who then feel powerless to help.   Usually, family care would not include giving injections for these breakthrough symptoms, even though this is legal and practical.

Bangor University is working with partners in Cardiff University and Gloucester NHS Trust, to research whether lay carer role extension to give these ‘as needed’ injections should be more widely adopted or not in the UK. 

Publication date: 15 March 2017

Can National Parks benefit both people and wildlife?

National Parks, Nature Reserves and other protected areas have existed in some form since the 19th century and now cover some 13% of the global land area, but we don’t fully understand the impact on human populations of devoting such large areas of land to wildlife conservation. A systematic review of the evidence published today (28 October 2013 in Journal Environmental Evidence) suggests that there can be both positive and negative impacts when protected areas are established, but our understanding of how more win-win outcomes for both people and nature can be achieved is limited.

Publication date: 28 October 2013

Can plants replace oil derived compounds?

Bangor University is responding to the ever increasing price of oil and the global depletion of fossil fuel supplies by pioneering research into the extraction of useful compounds from every day plants.

Publication date: 9 September 2011

Can we use eDNA as an ‘environmental magnifying-glass’?

An innovative idea submitted by Bangor University has been selected as one of eight projects selected within four “idea” areas to be funded by the Natural Environment Research Council’s (NERC) new “Highlight Topic” research funding stream.

Based on their research, the scientific community were invited to subject project areas which would place environmental science at the heart of the sustainable management of the planet.

“Environmental DNA: a tool for 21st century ecology”, the new idea suggested by Bangor University in collaboration with other academics and stakeholders, was among around 150 submissions. The successful project will assess how we can use new genetic techniques to measure biodiversity.

Publication date: 2 November 2015

Capturing nature’s wealth to reduce poverty

Researchers from Bangor University will lead a £2 million project to investigate whether international schemes that pay people in low income countries to protect globally important habitats can reduce poverty.

Publication date: 4 June 2013

Carbon scientists go underground to look for answers

An unusual below-ground laboratory, set to be the only one of its kind in the UK, is to begin work at Bangor University later this year, enabling scientists to discover more about carbon held in the soil.

Publication date: 22 February 2011

CARIAD helps Ethiopian researchers to improve food security

Ethiopian researchers working with scientists at Bangor University’s Centre for Advanced Research in International Agricultural Development (CARIAD), have achieved a breakthrough in increasing the food security of poor farmers in drought prone areas of Ethiopia. They have identified two Indian wheat varieties, adapted to Ethiopian conditions, which give higher yields when rainfall is scarce.

Publication date: 8 March 2011

Caring for Foster parents so that they are better placed to care for the children

Parenting has its own stresses and its own rewards, but as the UK faces a crisis in the numbers of foster parents available, one university is finding ways to improve personal well-being and reduce the stress-levels of those currently working in that role.

Publication date: 21 March 2013

Cartoon Camping -Dementia and Imagination roll up at Green Man Festival

People attending the Green Man Festival should keep an eye out for two ‘virtual’ festival-goers- Doris and Ivor.  The mystery cartoon duo, complete with cartoon campsite, car and sausages are the creation of research artist Carol Hanson, who, along with and members of the Dementia and Imagination team are heading to the Green Man Festival this week.

Publication date: 17 August 2015

Cash remains king in Chile but its days could be numbered

This article by Bernardo Batiz-Lazo, Bangor University and Juan Felipe Espinosa, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

For more than a year now, Chileans have endured a crisis of cash access. Despite global moves toward new forms of payment such as contactless and mobile transfers, the crisis in Chile highlights the continuing importance of ATMs in today’s payment ecosystem for many people worldwide – particularly those with lower incomes.

Publication date: 25 March 2015

Catfish study reveals importance of being ‘similar but different’

A group of armoured catfishes abundant in small rivers and streams across South America are not all they appear- in fact communities are far more diverse and complex than previously suspected.

A new multidisciplinary study, reported in Nature (6.1.11), has enabled evolutionary biologists at Bangor University to establish for the first time that many Corydoras catfish that live together in the same rivers actually mimic each other’s colour patterns.

Publication date: 6 January 2011

Cattle feed or biogas? Bangor study reveals important environmental trade-offs for biogas production on dairy farms

There is increasing interest in on-farm anaerobic digestion (AD) in the UK to manage animal manures and food waste, and to generate renewable electricity and heat via combustion of biogas.

Publication date: 4 August 2014

Caught in the wire: The rise of border security fences forces reconsideration of wildlife conservation strategies in Eurasia

Between 25,000 and 30,000 kilometres of wire fences and walls surround many countries in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. These are killing wildlife that becomes entangled and act as a barrier to wildlife movements, cutting species off from important seasonal habitats. The long-term consequences are a lower viability of wildlife populations, and a reduction in their ability to respond to climate change. This situation forces a re-think of transboundary conservation strategies.

Publication date: 23 June 2016

Celebrated 'English' poet Edward Thomas was one of Wales' finest writers

Shortly after 7am on April 9 1917, 39-year-old writer Edward Thomas was killed by a shell during the Battle of Arras in northern France. He left a body of mostly unpublished work that has since cemented his place as one of Britain’s greatest poets.

This article by Andrew Webb, Senior Lecturer in English Literature, was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 7 April 2017

Celtic Media Festival Shortlist

A Bangor University lecturer is on the short list at the annual Celtic Media Festival for his latest documentary. Dr Llion Iwan directed a tribute to master poet Dic Jones following his death in 2009, and which was broadcast on S4C in 2010. Llion lectures in journalism and documentary film at the School of Creative Studies and Media.

Publication date: 14 March 2011

Censorship under Franco’s dictatorship still casts a shadow over literature in Spain

Skyfall, the twenty-third James Bond film, is to be released 26 October 2012 to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the first film, Dr No  in 1962. But fans of the secret agent may be surprised to learn that Spanish readers of Dr No, one of Ian Fleming’s most popular novels, are reading a version which still bears cuts imposed by censors under Franco’s Dictatorship (1939-1975).

Readers in Spain will be equally surprised to discover that this and many of the published translation of the classics of English and American literature currently available are still the edited versions approved by the Dictator’s censors - and that until very recently many other novels have remained unavailable in Spain due to the legacy of the censorship of the Franco era.

Publication date: 22 October 2012

CERQual: A new approach for supporting the use of qualitative evidence in decision making

A new paper published in PLOS Medicine describes an innovative and transparent approach for assessing how much confidence to place in findings from qualitative evidence syntheses.

The new approach, known as CERQual (‘Confidence in the Evidence from Reviews of Qualitative research’), is designed to help decision makers use qualitative evidence for decisions and policies about healthcare and social welfare.

Publication date: 6 November 2015

Changing the use of agricultural land could massively reduce greenhouse gas emissions

A Bangor University academic has contributed to a new study which provides a radical and important new perspective on how to address the UK’s climate change commitments. The research has found making farmland more productive could increase the amount of food it produces and bring about significant reductions in the UK’s greenhouse gas emissions.

Publication date: 4 January 2016

Chefs and home cooks are rolling the dice on food safety

Encouraging anyone to honestly answer an embarrassing question is no easy task – not least when it might affect their job.

For our new research project, we wanted to know whether chefs in a range of restaurants and eateries, from fast food venues and local cafes to famous city bistros and award-winning restaurants, were undertaking “unsafe” food practices.

This article  by Paul Cross, Senior Lecturer in the Environment, School of Environment, Natural Resources & Geography Bangor University and Dan Rigby, Professor, Environmental Economics, University of Manchester was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 3 July 2017

Child migrants taken to Britain: now they need support and psychological care

This article by Leanne K Simpson, PhD Candidate, School of Psychology | Institute for the Psychology of Elite Performance, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Hundreds of unaccompanied child asylum seekers are being taken to Britain, moved from a camp in Calais, northern France, as its closure begins. There were 387 unaccompanied minors in the French refugee camp known as “the Jungle” with links to the UK and they are arriving in England in groups of 70.

Publication date: 24 October 2016

CHildren and Young people Managing Epilepsy at home: The CHYME study

A research project aimed at improving self-management for children and young people with epilepsy was launched by Mary Burrows, Chief Executive, BCUHB recently (Friday 20th January 2012).

Publication date: 19 January 2012

Child victim or brutal warlord? ICC weighs the fate of Dominic Ongwen

The trial of Dominic Ongwen before the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague is like none other springing from the killing fields of the Great Lakes of Africa. These include the prosecution of the first person ever to be convicted by the ICC, Thomas Lubanga. He was accused of mass human rights violations as a rebel leader in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Also ongoing is the trial of Bosco Ntaganda, another Congolese.

This article by Yvonne McDermott, Senior Lecturer in Law, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 12 January 2017

Citizen Scientists sought to investigate our saltmarshes

We are an island nation, and yet we know surprisingly little about parts of our coastline.

Publication date: 1 July 2016

Clams reveal secrets of changing marine climate

Marine scientists at Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences are collecting useful information about climate change from an unlikely source – seashells.

Publication date: 26 September 2013

Climate change effect on release of CO2 from peat far greater than assumed

Drought causes peat to release far more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere than has previously been realised.

Publication date: 21 November 2011

Climate change should not affect near elimination of malaria

Some good news in the face of climate change has emerged from health economists: a study into the health economics of combatting malaria in countries nearing elimination has shown that climate change will not have too great an effect and should not dissuade health organisations from continuing to scale- up their current elimination methods.

Publication date: 16 February 2015

Climate Change: The Evidence

Prof Bridget Emmett & Dr Clive Walmsley present the latest talks in the Climate Change debate series  on 15 November . The climate change lecture series ends on 29th November with a Public Question Time debate.

Publication date: 20 September 2011

Climate-changing carbon loss from mangroves preventable - say Bangor scientists

The release of dangerous amounts of greenhouse gases from mangrove swamps could be halted, claim scientists.

A team of researchers, led by Bangor University, say they have the potential to stop climate-changing amounts of gases, such as carbon dioxide, from leaving tropical mangroves if they are damaged or cut-down.

Publication date: 9 June 2016

Coastal light pollution disturbs marine animals, new study shows

Marine ecosystems can be changed by night-time artificial lighting according to new research published in the journal Biology Letters. The results indicate that light pollution from coastal communities, shipping and offshore infrastructure could be changing the composition of marine invertebrate communities.

Publication date: 29 April 2015

Collaboration on Materials for Flexible Display Electronics Awarded ‘Outstanding’ by the Technology Strategy Board

SmartKem Ltd, a leading developer of high performance, organic semiconductor materials for flexible displays & electronics, and Bangor University are delighted to announce that a recent Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP) has been awarded a grade of ‘Outstanding’ by the Technology Strategy Board.

Publication date: 10 March 2014

Collaboration to develop and implement new Infection Prevention Link Nurse Programme

A new project has been set up in collaboration between the University's School of Healthcare Sciences and Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board (BCUHB) to develop a new programme to promote best practice in infection prevention.

Publication date: 17 January 2017

Combining daycare for children and elders benefits all generations

We live in a society where care of young and old is increasingly segregated, with very limited opportunity for the two age groups to interact. If we just thought a little more socially, however, these “book end generations” could become great resources for each other – all we need to do is put them in the same place.

This article by Catrin Hedd Jones, Lecturer in Dementia Studies, School of Healthcare Sciences was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.Catrin Hedd JonesBangor University

Publication date: 4 January 2017

Community-led marine reserve sees lobsters thrive

The first and only fully-protected marine reserve in Scotland is proving highly beneficial for marine conservation and fisheries, with lobsters more than doubling in numbers and increasing in size.

Conducting potting surveys over four years in Lamlash Bay, Firth of Clyde, Scotland, scientists from the Universities of York and Bangor monitored populations of European lobster (Homarus gammarus), brown crab (Cancer pagurus) and velvet swimming crabs (Necora puber).

Publication date: 3 October 2016

Computers that can understand our emotions?

Having a computer that can read our emotions could lead to all sorts of new applications, including computer games where the player has to control their emotions while playing. Thomas Christy, a Computer Science PhD student at Bangor University is hoping to bring this reality a little nearer by developing a system that will enable computers to read and interpret our emotions and moods in real time.

Publication date: 19 January 2011

Conference to examine minority language music and copyright law

A special bilingual conference is to be held at Bangor to explore recent developments in copyright law and the impact of the law on minority language music.

Hosted by Bangor University Law School, ‘Collecting and Protecting: 21st century copyright and minority language music’ will be held at Bangor University’s Neuadd Reichel on Thursday 13th February, 9.30am-4.00pm.

Publication date: 7 February 2014

Confidence can be a bad thing – here's why

Have you ever felt 100% confident in your ability to complete a task, and then failed miserably? After losing in the first round at Queen’s Club for the first time since 2012, world number one tennis player, Andy Murray, hinted that “overconfidence” might have been his downfall. Reflecting on his early exit, Murray said: “Winning a tournament is great and you feel good afterwards, but you can also sometimes think that your game is in a good place and maybe become a little bit more relaxed in that week beforehand.”

This article by Stuart Beattie, Lecturer of Psychology, Bangor University and Tim Woodman, Professor and Head of the School of Sport, Health and Exercise SciencesBangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 23 June 2017

Conservation scientists call for global strategy to halt threatened animal extinctions

Aiming to stop the looming extinction of large wild-animal species across the globe, a group of international conservation scientists has issued a call for actions to halt further declines.

Publication date: 28 July 2016

Cool new uses for Wool

Ever wondered how sheep survive on those cold, wet hills? Their wool has amazing insulation properties to keep them warm, and man has taken advantage of their fleece for millennia. But to keep things cool?

Research scientists at Bangor University’s BioComposites Centre have now helped to further reveal the amazing properties of wool as a cold chain insulation material, to prove its performance in new and valuable applications.

Publication date: 18 January 2016

Corrugated solar building material reveals potential

Research by Noel Bristow (PhD in electronic engineering) and Dr Jeff Kettle of Bangor University’s School of Electronic Engineering published in The Royal Society of Chemistry (Energy & Environmental Science, DOI:10.1039/C5EE02162F) suggests that applying organic photovoltaics (OPVs) onto three dimensional substrates (as opposed to flat), can provide substantial improvements to their efficiency and usefulness. 

Publication date: 26 October 2015

Could Disappearance of Arctic Ice signal another cold snap this winter?

Scientists have established a link between the cold, snowy winters in Britain and melting sea ice in the Arctic and have warned that long periods of freezing weather are likely to become more frequent in years to come.

Publication date: 26 September 2011

Could Orkney lead the way in generating low carbon electricity?

Marine renewable energy experts at Bangor University have published a new study which examines the potential of Orkney, in the north of Scotland, to generate low carbon electricity through tidal turbines.

Publication date: 17 March 2014

Could the Arctic be coming out of hibernation?

Reduced ice cover in the Arctic Ocean could be the reason why the UK has experienced colder winters recently.

 

The ice has acted to insulate temperature changes in the sea from the atmosphere. But as the ice decreases in coverage this could have a consequent effect on our climate.

 

“Some climatologists believe the absence of sea ice north of Siberia last autumn allowed the warmer open ocean to heat the atmosphere, resulting in changed wind patterns and the development of a “blocking” atmospheric high pressure system over Siberia. This then results in cold air being channelled south from the Arctic, over northern Europe,” explains Dr Tom Rippeth of Bangor University.

 

Scientists at the University have also just discovered that the Arctic Ocean, is not as tranquil as previously supposed by oceanographers and this too could have an effect on the climate.

Publication date: 16 March 2011

Could wild mangoes solve the world's chocolate crisis?

This Article by Sayma AkhterBangor UniversityMorag McDonaldBangor University, and Ray Marriott,Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Theobroma, the genus to which cacao, or “cocoa” as we know it, belongs, translates from the Latin as “food of the gods”. Ask any serious chocoholic and they would agree that this is an apt name to be used in relation to the sweet treat that many worldwide enjoy.

Publication date: 21 October 2016

Creating a ‘computer-simulated’ virtual patient to train clinicians

In the future, should you need complicated surgery, the surgeon will be able to prepare and even practice for the procedure on a virtual simulation of your own body or body part that needs attention.

The technology is currently in development to create complete whole body ’simulations’ to train surgeons and other medical professional how to undertake various medical procedures, using ‘virtual’ dummies that appear to be there, and even ‘feel’ as though they’re there, by use of 3D computer graphics  haptic or ‘force feedback’ devices.

Leading the field in Wales in developing this technology is Bangor University’s Professor Nigel John, an expert in visualisation technology at the School of Computer Science.

Publication date: 29 August 2013

Cultural views should influence conservation polices

Conservation policy needs to take account of diverse cultural views about the value of different species, according to the results of a new study led by Bangor University.

Publication date: 11 July 2012

Cutting-edge Bangor University Spin-Out company opened by Minister

Julie James, Minister for Skills and Science officially opened Suprex, a cutting-edge technology company and joint venture between Bangor University and Phytovation Ltd recently (Monday 10th October).

Publication date: 11 October 2016

“Darwin’s puddle” shows how new species can emerge without geographic separation

Cichlid fish from a tiny volcanic crater have been caught in the act of sympatric speciation

Can new species really evolve if there is no physical boundary to drive genetic separation? Physical and genomic evidence from the 700-metre wide volcanic crater Lake Massoko appears to have caught the process in the act.

Publication date: 18 December 2015

Dating Anglesey’s birth as an island and formation of the Menai Strait

Research has revealed when Anglesey became a permanent island through the formation of the Menai Strait.

Mike Roberts, a mature student from Amlwch, conducted the research as part of his PhD at Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences, supported by the Cemlyn Jones Trust and the Countryside Council for Wales.

His research, just published in an academic journal, reveals that the Strait became a permanent feature between 5,800 and 4,600 years ago around the time when hunter-gatherers were replaced by the first farmers in north Wales.

Publication date: 1 March 2011

Deciphering the connection between language and meaning

A Bangor University academic discusses the connection between language and meaning in a new book published by Cambridge University Press.

In The Crucible of Language, Professor Vyv Evans brings the latest findings together to explain what we know, and what we do, when we communicate using language. He shows how linguistic meaning arises, where it comes from, and the way in which language enables us to convey the meanings that can move us to tears, bore us to death, or make us dizzy with delight. 

Publication date: 8 December 2015

Dementia: “illness” label may lower mood

North Walians have taken part in research which has just been published and indicates that people who perceive dementia symptoms as an illness feel more negative than those who see it as an inevitable part of getting older.

Publication date: 1 March 2016

Developing ‘Mental toughness’ can help footballers cope with high pressure penalty shoot outs

Penalty shoot-outs are possibly the most stressful situations that footballers have to contend with. They need to be able to focus on the task and block out noise and other distractions coming from the stands.

Publication date: 21 June 2012

Developing new long-range micro backpacks for bees

A project to develop a new means of tracking bees in the landscape is progressing well according to scientists at Bangor University. 

An ecologist and a microsystems engineer are working together to develop micro-backpacks for bees that will enable the bees to be followed by small drones as they fly from plant to plant. 

This will enable scientists to learn more about where the bees collect nectar and what might be affecting their numbers.  

Publication date: 29 August 2017

Diabetes UK funds Bangor University research into insulin-producing gene

Leading health charity Diabetes UK has funded a research project at Bangor University to investigate a gene which could identify important new avenues for diabetes treatment.

Publication date: 22 February 2011

Different motivations for high-risk activities revealed for the first time

For over 50 years the motive for high-risk activities has been thought of simply as “sensation seeking”. New research unequivocally challenges that simplistic view.

Publication date: 26 July 2013

Digital platforms offer the Welsh language a new medium

New digital platforms which we use frequently these days, offer an opportunity for the Welsh language to play a wider role in everyday life.

Researchers at Bangor University are interested to find out how people use the language within digital platforms, and are therefore carrying out two surveys that are available to the public.

Publication date: 5 October 2016

Does a new era of bleaching beckon for Indian Ocean coral reefs?

Despite extensive media coverage, campaigns and scientists’ warnings, still the world is not fully aware of what coral bleaching is and why it is happening. Mention bleaching and some think that it is the death of the Great Barrier Reef’s coral, but the problem is much more widespread. 

This article by Ronan Roche, Research Fellow, Bangor University and John Turner, Professor & Dean of Postgraduate Research, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 10 March 2017

Don't make a mistake; don't make a mistake; DOH!

Athletes at the Olympic Games will strive to perform to their potential under intense pressure this summer. Each one will be trying to win a gold medal and concentrating on not making any mistakes. However, researchers at Bangor University’s Institute for the Psychology of Elite Performance (IPEP) have revealed that some performers are likely to make a mistake that they least want to.

Publication date: 2 May 2012

Double fish production while preserving biodiversity – can it be done?

Bangor University is involved in new consortium to establish National Aquaculture and Development Centre (NADC) in Tanzania to help tackle poverty and undernutrition. 

Tanzania, perhaps best known for safaris over its vast open plains, has ambitious plans for diminutive freshwater wildlife with enormous, untapped potential.  

Tilapia, second only to carp as the world’s most frequently farmed fish, live in huge numbers in the Great Lakes (Victoria, Tanganyika, Malawi/Nyasa) that cover six percent of the country. The lakes are considered a global biodiversity hotspot – one of only 25 worldwide - due to the hundreds of species of cichlid fish, including some of the 30-odd known subspecies of tilapia that are found in Tanzania.  

However, Tanzanians eat on average only 8kg of fish per year, less than half the international average of 17kg. Around a third of children under five are deficient in iron and vitamin A, contributing to stunting, while about a third of women between 15-49 years old are deficient in iron, vitamin A and iodine. 

Publication date: 11 January 2017

Drinking sugar-sweetened soft drinks leads to fat gain

New research from Bangor University has shown that regularly drinking sugar sweetened soft drinks can increase fat gain, inhibit fat metabolism, and increases blood glucose in your body.  So if you’re thirsty and think of reaching for a sugary soft drink- don’t - it can compromise your long-term health. Reach for water instead.

Publication date: 20 July 2012

Early Christian Irish and Scots ‘first-footers’ in Iceland

The first Icelandic inhabitants were not Vikings or Scandinavians, but early Irish or Scottish people, newly published archaeological work reveals. The Icelandic people have long had an interest in the early settlers who founded their nation, one of youngest islands to be inhabited worldwide, and have held that their forbearers, the island’s first inhabitants, were Vikings.

An article "Viking beaters: Scots and Irish may have settled Iceland a century before Norsemen" has been published on The Conversation (23/05/15). It was written by Kristjan Ahronson. 

Publication date: 25 May 2015

Early research findings show Wales' Child & Adolescent Health falling short of standards

Wales’ Child and Adolescent Mental health services fall short of standards according to early research findings (17 November).

The findings were reported at the launch of Observatory@Bangor, the North Wales branch of the Wales Observatory on the Human Rights of Children and Young People, based at Bangor University Law School.

Publication date: 17 November 2015

ECB enlists Bangor University scientists to help with cricket talent testing

The England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) has turned to sports scientists at Bangor University to assist them in creating a talent forecasting model to help identify future generations of world-class cricketers.

The aim of the research project between the ECB and the University’s School of Sport, Health & Exercise Sciences is to validate a model for predicting cricket talent. This will be used to help selectors and coaches assess and identify promising young players and increase their conversion rate into successful international cricketers.

Publication date: 9 March 2011

Eminent engineer launches Pontio Innovation

One of the UK's most eminent engineers, Professor Sir John O'Reilly was at Bangor University recently (28 January) to launch Arloesi Pontio Innovation.

Sir John O’Reilly was most recently Director General of Knowledge and Innovation for the UK Government. He is a former Head of the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science at Bangor University. He then became Chief Executive of the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and Vice-Chancellor of Cranfield University.

Publication date: 11 January 2016

Engineering at Bangor wins £500k for CLARET project

A unique new facility has opened at Bangor University.  The Centre, the first of its kind in Wales, will enable businesses to test a huge range of plastic electronics, space-related equipment and solar cells.

Publication date: 22 January 2014

Enigmatic Eliseg reveals its secrets

An Open Afternoon between 2-5 on Saturday 8 September will give the public an opportunity to find more about the third season of excavations at the Pillar of Eliseg, a ninth-century AD stone monument which stands on a prehistoric mound near Valle Crucis Abbey Llangollen, in north-east Wales. Archaeologists from Bangor and Chester Universities are returning to carry out a third season of excavations at the site between 26 August -16 September 2012.

Publication date: 22 August 2012

Erosion of traditional ‘taboos’ threatens Madagascar’s lemurs

Madagascar is world famous for its unique animals, many of which are protected by law, but recent research has demonstrated that illegal hunting of these protected species may be widespread and pose an urgent threat the country’s globally important biodiversity.

Research by a team from Bangor University and the Malagasy organization Madagasikara Voakajy, reported in the online scientific and medical research journal, PLOS ONE  suggests that hunting of protected species in eastern Madagascar is increasing due to rapid social change, as appetites for meat increase and traditional taboos protecting the species, especially lemurs, become less powerful.

Publication date: 15 December 2011

Ethiopian ‘Church Forests’ are a crucial resource deserving of world heritage status

Nearly all of the natural forest cover has been lost in the highlands of Ethiopia, except for small areas of sacred forest surrounding the many individual churches of the Ethiopian Tewahedo Orthodox Church.

The first study to assess the conservation value of these forests has shown that the Ethiopian ‘church forests’, as they are known, play a crucial role in the protection of many species in this global biodiversity hotspot. Although these forests are managed individually, together they form an important network of habitats spread right over the vast area of the central and northern highlands of Ethiopia.

Publication date: 7 March 2016

EU-backed project helps maximise the potential of Welsh businesses in the green economy

Economy Minister, Edwina Hart, today (15 May) launched the next phase of a project aimed at helping businesses in West Wales and the Valleys become more sustainable and support the low carbon economy.

The WISE Network is a collaborative project between Aberystwyth, Bangor and Swansea universities that enables businesses across the region to take full advantage of the growth in the green economy.

Publication date: 15 May 2013

EU project to support water industry in Wales and Ireland

A £2.5m EU-backed project to improve the long-term sustainability of water supply in Wales and Ireland has been announced by Finance and Government Business Minister, Jane Hutt.

Publication date: 31 March 2016

European tourists to Wales to have new window on the past

European tourists visiting Wales will be able to read historical accounts of visits to Wales through the ages via a new portal to be completed next year.

Publication date: 12 June 2017

EuroVisions How others have viewed Wales

Have you ever wondered how others see us? A new public exhibition, drawing on research at Bangor University’s School of Modern Languages and Cultures, looks at how European visitors – including explorers, tourists and refugees – have viewed Wales since the mid-eighteenth century. The exhibition at Bangor’s new Storiel is called EuroVisions: Wales through the Eyes of European Visitors, 1750-2015 and runs from April to 2 July.

Publication date: 29 April 2016

Experience Medieval worship at St Teilo’s Church

Step into the Medieval Church of St Teilo’s next week (Tuesday 13th and Thursday 15th  11.30 & 4.00) and you will experience, as closely as possible, the sights and sounds that accompanied our Medieval ancestors at prayer. The rare and unusual services take place at the reconstructed medieval decorated church of St Teilo at St Fagans: National History Museum of Wales.

Publication date: 9 September 2011

Experts of the future brought to Wales

The establishment of a Doctoral Training Centre will allow 33 new postgraduate studentships to be offered every year in Wales for the next five years.

 

The postgraduates will be trained in a range of important disciplines, including social policy, psychology, economics, environmental planning and linguistics.

Publication date: 4 February 2011

Explosives detection research being conducted at Bangor University

Scientists at the School of Chemistry in Bangor University are working on novel sensor technology which will, it is hoped, soon be trialled in airports.  The group at the School of Chemistry in Bangor is working as part of a European consortium called Nanosecure.  The group consists of 26 partners both academic and industrial all working towards an integrated system which will detect airborne explosives, narcotics, chemical and biological agents.  The system will also be able to decontaminate the air from chemical and bio agents should some be detected.  It will do this by integrating with a building’s air-conditioning units.  One of the partners in this consortium is Schiphol Airport where it is hoped the units will be trialled.

Publication date: 8 November 2010

Extinct Elephant Seal population reveals an evolutionary ‘time-machine’

Genetic diversity within isolated populations can occur quite rapidly in evolutionary terms, according to findings of a paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B (available online 29.1.14 http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2013.3078).

Publication date: 29 January 2014

Extremes Research group to investigate altitude illness in Himalayan expedition

This week, academics from Bangor University will lead an expedition to the Himalayas as part of a research project to investigate altitude related illness. Researchers Dr Samuel Oliver and Dr Jamie Macdonald, PhD student Gabriella Rossetti and undergraduate Sport Science student James Pollard  - all from Bangor University’s School of Sport, Health and Exercise Sciences - will be part of the 55-strong team comprising of medical doctors, scientists and mountain rescuers, who will embark on the expedition on the 20th March, returning on the 25th April.

Publication date: 19 March 2015

Facial cosmetics have little effect on attractiveness judgments compared with identity

The idea that cosmetics make you more attractive is all around us. The internet features thousands of tutorials on how to apply makeup, fashion magazines comment on different makeup styles of celebrities, and many women feel they wouldn’t leave the house without it. This simple, day-to-day behaviour has also been the subject of scientific inquiry, with many studies finding that not only are women rated as more attractive with makeup, but also as healthier, more competent, and more likeable.

Publication date: 28 January 2015

Fact Check: Do six million people earn less than the living wage?

I’m angry and fed up with the way in which six million people earn less than the living wage.

Jeremy Corbyn, leader of the Labour Party, interviewed on the BBC’s Andrew Marr show on April 23.

To assess this claim by Jeremy Corbyn, distinguishing various low-wage floors is important. In 2017, the Living Wage Foundation’s higher voluntary Real Living Wage (RLW) is £9.75 an hour in London, £8.45 elsewhere, based on a calculation of living costs.

The government’s compulsory wage floor is lower and covers all employees. For employees aged 25 and over, it’s called the National Living Wage (NLW) and is £7.50 per hour. For younger employees, it’s called the National Minimum Wage, and ranges from £3.50 to £7.05.

Publication date: 27 April 2017

'Facts are not truth': Hilary Mantel goes on the record about historical fiction

In a recent talk at the Hay literary festival, Cambridge historian and biographer John Guy said he had seen an increasing number of prospective students citing Hilary Mantel’s Booker Prize-winning historical novels, Wolf Hall and Bring up the Bodies, as supporting evidence for their knowledge of Tudor history.

This article by Michael Durrant, Lecturer in Early Modern Literature, School of English Literature,was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 13 June 2017

Ffordd Pawb/ Coherent Connections- an innovative project comes to Bangor

Psychology students at Bangor University are getting involved in an innovative international project which could provide creative new solutions for complex modern problems faced in Bangor, as well as by other communities.

Publication date: 11 October 2016

Final Year Biomedical Science Student Makes Break-Through Cancer Discovery

A long standing enigma in cancer biology is how the cell growth regulator Cdc2 can be active and inactive at the same time. Human cells stop dividing in the presence of genetic damage by inactivating Cdc2, but they also need active Cdc2 to remove the genomic defects.

Publication date: 2 July 2015

First count your species- Scientists urge better information before further conservation decisions are made in Australia

Arguments have raged about whether or not dingoes should be culled and how far they are useful in safeguarding threatened smaller fauna, as they prey on the larger cats and foxes.   While the Australian wildlife services are spending thousands on other means of controlling non-native species, without achieving great results, there is evidence that maintaining dingo numbers benefits the smaller mammals.

A paper in the Journal of Applied Ecology (doi: 10.1111/1365-2664.12250 published Friday 10 April) urges all the participants in what has been, at times, a heated debate, to lay down their differences and get back into the field to collate the robust data necessary to provide certainty for management action.

Publication date: 9 April 2014

First ever Bangor University prestigious 125th anniversary research scholarship completed

Marco Giudici, 29, from Milan, recently completed his 125th anniversary research scholarship in History. Marco, who now lives in Hitchin, Hertforshire, is the first to complete one of the 125th anniversary research scholarships from Bangor University.

Introduced to mark the 125th Anniversary of Bangor University, the Anniversary Research Scholarships are part of the University’s programme of postgraduate expansion. They aim to attract outstanding students who wish to study in this dynamic and research focused university.

Publication date: 26 February 2013

First Global Study: Seagrass beds can store twice as much carbon as forests

Globally threatened seabed areas are hotspots for carbon storage according to a paper published in the journal Nature Geoscience this week (20.5.11 doi:10.1038/ngeo1477 ). The study “Seagrass Ecosystems as a Globally Significant Carbon Stock” is the first global analysis of carbon stored in seagrass meadows.

Publication date: 22 May 2012

First investigation of eye-tracking in Electronic Gaming Machine play

New research, funded by GambleAware used eye-tracking to investigate how machine players pay attention to Electronic Gaming Machine (EGM) displays in local bookmaker offices.

The research, conducted by Professor Robert Rogers and colleagues at Bangor University's School of Psychology is the first study to use eye-tracking to improve our understanding of how machine players pay attention to roulette and slot games in commercial settings. The study describes the distribution of visual attention towards the game features of roulette and slots, and offers methodology for studying and optimizing the timing, placement and content of harm-minimisation messaging. The data show that problem gamblers look less often at the roulette wheel while placing bets and while it spun, compared to non-problem gamblers, and tended to look away from the machine more frequently. By contrast, in slot games, problem gamblers looked more frequently at amount-won messages.

Publication date: 26 April 2017

Food Dudes has spun out

Over the past ten years the Food Dudes programme at the School of Psychology has gone from strength to strength – winning grants, accolades, and awards around the world. In the process, it has improved the eating habits and health of hundreds of thousands of kids.  And recently, leading the school’s drive toward commercialisation, the programme has become its own spin-out company -  Food Dudes Health Ltd (FDH).

Publication date: 1 June 2012

Footballers’ voices: gambling and addiction in football

Media reports have highlighted gambling problems amongst a minority of professional footballers. New research, published in Addiction Research Theory, has revealed how some players could develop difficulties with their gambling, and what can be done to help them seek treatment.

Footballers with a range of professional experiences, who have experienced gambling problems, were interviewed as part of research by Bangor, London and Oxford universities. The researchers had direct access to the players to learn about their experiences of gambling and how and why their gambling became a problem.

Publication date: 19 August 2016

Forest conservation approaches must recognise the rights of local people

Until the 1980s, biodiversity conservation in the tropics focused on the “fines and fences” approach: creating protected areas from which local people were forcibly excluded. More recently, conservationists have embraced the notion of “win-win”: a dream world where people and nature thrive side by side.

This article by Sarobidy Rakotonarivo, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, University of Stirling and Neal Hockley, Research Lecturer in Economics & Policy, Bangor University  was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 9 August 2017

Forget Jon Snow, watch the young women to find out how Game of Thrones ends

For Game of Thrones fans, the current series has been a bit of a mystery. As the television writers have picked up the storyline where author George R. R. Martin’s A Song of Fire and Ice novels ended, there is, for the first time, no original text to refer back to.

 

This article by Raluca Radulescu, Professor of Medieval Literature and English Literature, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article

Publication date: 25 August 2017

Forging new research talent

The search is on for the next generation of talented researchers building their careers in Wales.

Welsh Crucible, the development scheme for the nation’s research leaders of the future, is recruiting for this summer’s capacity-building programme.

Publication date: 8 February 2012

From Geoffrey Chaucer to Jeff Sessions, misspeaking is when you lie about lying

When US attorney-general Jeff Sessions told his confirmation hearing he had not had any communication with any Russians during the presidential election campaign, only for it to turn out that he had twice met with the Russian ambassador to Washington, Sergey Kislyak, he was apparently “misspeaking”. So that’s ok then. 

But maybe not – while “misspeak” undoubtedly has the innocent connotation of “speaking incorrectly” or even “mispronouncing”, it is a sad reflection on contemporary life that whenever a politician uses a word, no matter how blameless the context might appear, people are less and less inclined to take the meaning of that word at face value.

This article by John Olsson, Lecturer in Law and Criminology, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 6 March 2017

From glass case to cyber-space:Chaucerian Masterpiece Goes Global

Bangor University and the National Library of Wales, Aberystwyth, have collaborated on a project to bring one of the jewels of English literature, kept at the National Library, freely available to all. The Hengwrt copy of Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, produced in London at the close of the fourteenth century and believed to be the earliest existing version of this work, is now fully digitised, and accessible by global users via the Library’s website.

Publication date: 15 May 2014

Funding boost for the National Centre for Population Health & Wellbeing Research

Bangor, Swansea and Cardiff Universities have recently won £2,249,927 funding from Health and Care Research Wales (formerly NISCHR) to lead the National Centre for Population Health and Wellbeing Research (NCPHWR), an all Wales Research Centre.

Publication date: 27 May 2015

Funding to develop dementia researchers

In Wales there at 45,000 people living with dementia and the cost of illness has been estimated at £1.4 billion per year. The highest part of this cost is unpaid care by family and friends. Support services can be fragmented and difficult for people to access across health and social care sectors. Poor transport links and the risk of carers feeling more isolated and unsupported are particular challenges for rural areas.

Researchers at Bangor University’s School of Healthcare Sciences have been awarded over half a million pounds in funding to undertake fellowships in dementia research. These fellowships, funded by Welsh Government through Health and Care Research Wales, aim to build capacity in health and social care research by supporting individuals to become independent researchers and to undertake high-quality research projects’.

Publication date: 30 August 2017

G8 summit announces £4 million research project about improving life with dementia

Researchers at Bangor University have been awarded £4 million to lead the ‘Improving the experience of Dementia and Enhancing Active life: Living well with dementia’ (IDEAL) project. The study will be carried out in collaboration with Cardiff University, Brunel University, the London School of Economics, King’s College London, Sussex University, the Research Institute for the Care of Older People (RICE), the Alzheimer’s Society and Innovations in Dementia CIC.

Publication date: 11 December 2013

Generation Beth reveals that Wales’ youth value their vote and feel European

S4C are calling on the young people of Wales to share their experiences as part of an interactive European project. Lecturer Dr. Cynog Prys and a doctoral student Shân Pritchard of the School of Social Science, have been invited to discuss and analyse the finding of the project that has partners in in 12 European countries.

This innovative project, called 'Generation Beth' is an evolution of a highly successful survey conducted in France in 2013 called 'Generation quoi'. This time, 12 countries, including Wales have joined France to create a truly European event. The project is led in Wales by S4C and the production company Cwmni Da.

Publication date: 6 May 2016

Getting to the heart of the matter

n a research project for the ESRC Public Services Programme, co-funded by the General Medical Council (the regulatory body for doctors), Dr Mark Exworthy and Professor Jonathan Gabe from Royal Holloway-University of London, and Ian Rees Jones from Bangor University, explored the impact of disclosure of death rates on cardiac surgeons. In 2009, they undertook an in-depth study at the micro level of a surgical unit, the meso level of the hospital in which the unit was based and the local Primary Care Trust, and the macro level of the regulatory environment. The research explored the connections between clinical professionals, managers and regulators.

Publication date: 4 March 2011

Getting Welsh GPs to act more quickly on cancer symptoms

A research project at  Bangor University will look at early cancer diagnosis - a priority area for the Welsh Government, as late presentation of cancer is thought to significantly contribute to the relatively poor survival of Welsh cancer patients compared to the rest of the UK.  The award had been made to Professor Richard Neal from the University's North Wales Centre for Primary Care Research, himself a practicing G.P and a world-leader in the field of early cancer diagnosis.

Publication date: 1 March 2016

Global decline of large herbivores may lead to an “empty landscape,” scientists say

The decline of the world’s large herbivores, especially in Africa and parts of Asia, is raising the specter of an “empty landscape” in some of the most diverse ecosystems on the planet. Many populations of animals such as rhinoceroses, zebras, camels, elephants and tapirs are diminishing or threatened with extinction in grasslands, savannahs, deserts and forests, scientists say.

Publication date: 2 May 2015

‘Golden thread’ should be sought to support region’s economy

One of the main thrusts of a new scoping report on the north Wales economy suggests that regional stakeholders are seeking to ensure that a 'golden thread' runs through the supply chain to enable local small firms to benefit from incoming economic opportunities.

The report also identifies that Welsh Government have the opportunity, through the potential for devolved powers on procurement rules, to ensure quality jobs and good terms and conditions for workers on inward investment projects.

Publication date: 7 July 2017

GPs refer Eighty per cent of suspected Cancers after two visits

MORE THAN eighty per cent of patients suspected of having cancer are being referred by their GP in the first two consultations, with more than half being sent to see a specialist at the first appointment, according to new research published in the British Journal of Cancer today (Friday).

Publication date: 8 February 2013

Green light for marine renewables?

Farms of ‘underwater windmills’ could affect how sand moves around our coastal seas, affecting beaches, sand banks and ultimately the risk of flooding, according to Bangor University oceanographer Dr Simon Neill.

Publication date: 15 September 2011

Ground-breaking healthcare research showcased

Ground-breaking research which is set to improve healthcare in Wales and the UK was showcased at Bangor University today (Thursday 2 July).

Three projects in particular were given prominence, during a visit by Welsh Government Health Minister Mark Drakeford to the University’s College of Health & Behavioural Sciences, due to their potential to impact on services and patients.

Publication date: 2 July 2015

Ground-Breaking project to brain-scan shoppers

Psychologists at Bangor University are to brain-scan supermarket-shoppers to test their reactions to promotions and special offers in a major cutting-edge project  with one of Europe’s leading shopping behaviour specialists.

Publication date: 22 November 2013

Growing oil palm for biofuels can’t save our climate

Growing oil palm to make ‘green’ biofuels in the tropics could be accelerating the effects of climate change, say scientists.

Publication date: 31 January 2013

Happy 100th birthday, Mr President: how JFK's image and legacy have endured

This article by Gregory Frame, Lecturer in Film Studies, School of Creative Industries & MediaBangor University, was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

John F Kennedy was born 100 years ago on May 29, 1917. While the achievements of his presidency and the content of his character have been subjects of contestation among historians and political commentators since the 1970s, there is little question regarding the enduring power of his image. As the youngest man to win election to the presidency, entering the White House with a beautiful wife and young children in tow, he projected the promise of a new era in American politics and society.

Publication date: 26 May 2017

Hard to fish areas of the seabed may act as refuges for endangered skate

Marine scientists working in the Celtic Sea have discovered a natural refuge for the critically endangered flapper skate. Many elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates) are highly vulnerable to over-fishing, but a new paper in the open access journal PLOS ONE shows that small areas of the seabed that experience below-average fishing intensity can sustain greater populations of these species.

Publication date: 15 November 2012

Harnessing our Welsh sunshine

In Wales, we receive on average, 1,390 sunshine hours each year, which could potentially be converted to electricity. If we could capture and convert a small fraction of that, we would need no other source of generation to meet all our energy needs.

The technology to capture this energy is photovoltaics, which harnesses the sun’s rays and converts the energy into electricity which can then be used locally or fed into the national grid.

Publication date: 2 September 2013

Have Bangor University researchers helped to solve the chocolate crisis?

Chocoholics around the globe have been aware for the last few years that their favourite sweet treat is under threat. Researchers at Bangor University may have come up with an answer that could help find a solution to the chocolate crisis by using wild mango as a new cocoa butter alternative.

Publication date: 1 September 2016

Health and Medical Research Showcase

Bangor University and the Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board (BCUHB) held their first open Joint Research Showcase recently. The event showcased current research interests across the two organisations and sought to create opportunity for greater research collaboration in the region. Over 110 delegates were registered for the conference and 50 research abstracts were submitted for the event which included a poster conference. 

Publication date: 7 October 2015

Health Services & Implementation Research Professor appointed Director of NIHR Health Services & Delivery Research Programme

Professor Jo Rycroft-Malone, of Bangor University has been appointed director of the National Institute for Health Research Health Services and Delivery Research (HS&DR) Programme. The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) is the largest funding body for applied health research in the UK. Prof Rycroft Malone follows Professor Ray Fitzpatrick when he steps down from his role leading the HS&DR Programme at the end of October 2015.

Publication date: 26 November 2014

Healthy eating for Denbighshire special schools

Denbighshire Council has become the first Council in Wales to pilot the successful and innovative Food Dudes healthy eating programme. The programme was launched in January in two Special Schools, Ysgol Tir Morfa in Rhyl and Ysgol Plas Brondyffryn in Denbigh, where it has been really well received by the staff, parents, and children.

Publication date: 21 August 2014

Helpful app for people with dementia

Bangor University is providing expertise to support the development and effectiveness of ‘Book of You’, an ‘app’ being welcomed as having the potential to revolutionise reminiscence therapy for people with dementia.

Publication date: 21 April 2015

Help in a Blizzard

Special jackets made in Wales could help keep Welsh athletes warm when the competition hots up in Glasgow.

Publication date: 22 July 2014

Helping local company who have developed and won the market for outdoor survival products

Working with Dr Sam Oliver and PhD student Jenny Brierley of the University’s Extremes Research Group, Derek Ryden of Blizzard Protection Systems Ltd. has been able to commission tailored research that measures exactly how good the products are. The University has been researching how effective the innovative material is in directing escaping body heat back into the body, preventing or delaying the onset of hypothermia in extreme conditions.

Publication date: 9 November 2011

Higher use of general health care services throughout adult life linked with traumatic childhoods

Experiencing physical, sexual or emotional abuse as a child, or other stresses such as living in a household affected by domestic violence, substance abuse or mental illness, can lead to higher levels of health service use throughout adulthood.

research paper in the Journal of Health Service Research & Policy provides, for the first time, the statistical evidence showing that, regardless of socio-economic class or other demographics, people who have adverse childhood experiences use more health and medical services through their lifetime.

Publication date: 12 July 2017

High-Flying Geese take low profile over Himalayas

A study published this week (31 October 2012) in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences has tackled the long-standing problem  of assessing the actual altitude and migration path of Bar-headed geese crossingthe Himalayas using state of the art satellite tracking technology. Scientists from Bangor University and an international team of collaborators recorded highly accurate GPS (Global Positioning System) locations from 42 individual geese as they migrated.

Publication date: 31 October 2012

Historic wrecks to assist Wales’ marine renewable energy future

Historic wrecks around Wales’ coastline, such as that of a German submarine sunk 10 miles off Bardsey Island at the tip of the Llŷn Peninsula on Christmas Day 1917, are to play a part in assisting Wales’ growing marine renewable energy sector.

Over the next two years, marine scientists from Bangor University will be surveying the coast of Wales as part of the ERDF-funded SEACAMS2 project led by the University in partnership with Swansea University. The researchers at Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences and Centre for Applied Marine Sciences are undertaking collaborative research, including marine surveys, to support the sustainable growth of the marine renewable energy sector in Wales. 

Publication date: 14 August 2017

Hitachi-GE, Imperial and Bangor University developing of UK and Welsh BWR expertise

Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd. (Hitachi-GE) has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with Imperial College London and Bangor University, enhancing its commitment to support Welsh and British expertise.

Publication date: 31 October 2016

Hot bath after exercise improves performance in the heat

New research from Bangor University shows that taking a hot bath after exercise for 6 days reduces both resting and exercising body temperature and improves running performance in the heat. Prof Walsh, whose team lead the work, said “for sports people who compete in the heat, the new mantra should be: "train-cool, bathe-hot".

Publication date: 11 December 2015

How do Welsh universities advance the world around us?

Today marks the launch of a new portal – www.researchwales.ac.uk – that will showcase some of the shining examples of how Welsh universities advance the world around us.   Among the research being showcased are excellent examples of research work by Bangor University’s academics, these include the following examples.

Publication date: 2 December 2014

How football’s richest clubs fail to pay staff a real living wage

This article by Tony DobbinsBangor University Byusiness School and Peter ProwseSheffield Hallam University, was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article

English football’s top flight, the Premier League, dominates the sporting world’s league tables for revenue. Star players, managers and executives command lucrative wages. Thanks to the biggest TV deal in world football, the 20 Premier League clubs share £10.4 billion between them.

Publication date: 30 March 2017

How forests recover rapidly on logging roads in the Congo Basin

Large areas of tropical forest worldwide are used for selective logging which requires extensive road networks to access trees harvested for timber. It is well documented that building roads into intact forest can have consequences for forest ecosystems. This is because they lead to fragmentation and facilitate access for people which can lead to long-term forest degradation or deforestation.

This article by John Healey, Professor of Forest Sciences, Bangor University and Fritz Kleinschroth, PhD Graduate and Researcher at CIRAD, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 6 June 2016

How Humans/children develop social skills: €1.5M ERC funding to examine the Cognitive Neuroscience behind the development of a “Social Brain”

Humans are inherently social creatures and our understanding of the world is shaped from the very beginning by the social interactions we observe and engage in. As a consequence, we are truly excellent at extracting information from social scenes. We can quickly discern if two people are cooperating or competing, flirting or fighting, and helping or hindering each other. Most important of all, we swiftly learn a great deal about people from observing their interactions with others – even a brief interaction give us important clues about their personality, their social abilities and their current mood. How does this remarkable skill develop? What are its brain bases? How is this kind of “social interaction perception” related to real-world social ability and social learning across development?

Publication date: 15 November 2016

How jobs figures mask bogus self-employment in the shadow economy

The UK has posted disappointing jobs data. Unemployment rose slightly for the first time in seven months, by 21,000 to 1.7m. It is still at a respectable rate of 5.1% and employment remains very high at 74.1%. But the figures need unpicking to identify the problems that lie beneath the surface of the country’s economy, despite months of positive headlines.

This article by Tony Dobbins, Professor of Employment Studies, Bangor UniversityAlexandra Plows, Research Fellow, Bangor University, and Howard Davis, Professor of Social Theory & Institutions, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 20 April 2016

How King Arthur became one of the most pervasive legends of all time

This article by Raluca Radulescu, Professor of Medieval Literature and English Literature, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

King Arthur is one of, if not the, most legendary icons of medieval Britain. His popularity has lasted centuries, mostly thanks to the numerous incarnations of his story that pop up time and time again.

Publication date: 3 February 2017

How much protection is enough?

Protection of marine areas from fishing increases density and biomass of fish and invertebrates (such as lobster and scallops) finds a systematic review published in BioMed Central’s open access journal Environmental Evidence. The success of a protected area was also dependent on its size and on how it was managed, however even partial protection provides significant ecological  benefits.

Publication date: 28 February 2013

How operational deployment affects soldiers' children

So many of us have seen delightful videos of friends and family welcoming their loved ones home from an operational tour of duty. The moment they are reunited is heartwarming, full of joy and tears – but, for military personnel who were deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan post 9/11, their time away came with unprecedented levels of stress for their whole family.

Military personnel faced longer and more numerous deployments, with short intervals in between. The impact of operational deployments on military personnel’s mental health is well reported. Far less is known, however, about how deployment affects military families, particularly those with young children.

This article by Leanne K Simpson, PhD Candidate, School of Psychology | Institute for the Psychology of Elite Performance, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 23 June 2017

How penguins use bubbles to 'take to the air'

A  suggestion by Bangor University Professor Roger Hughes of the School of Biological Sciences, that bubble trails seen in footage of emperor penguins swimming to the sea surface are produced to reduce drag is published in the November 2012 edition of National Geographic. Roger Hughes's intriguing idea while watching penguins on TV originally led to a research paper revealing just how the penguins could manage this. Collaborators at University College Cork and the Technical University of Denmark showed that ‘lubrication’ provided by tiny air bubbles released from under the feathers could allow penguins to gain enough speed to leap out of the water and onto the ice shelf.

Publication date: 22 October 2012

How personality affects sporting achievement

At the highest level of sporting performance, the difference between winning and losing may have more to do with your personality than your sporting prowess.

To achieve ‘Gold’, athletes need to be able to perform at a high level while under an immense amount of pressure. The key to success is the combination of the highest level of athletic performance and the ability to perform while also under great personal stress.  While some individuals thrive under pressure, others will ‘choke’ and fail to perform as well as in training - when the stress is reduced.

Publication date: 2 May 2012

How Pokemon Go turned couch potatoes into fitness fanatics without them even realising it

Pokemon Go, the latest version of the Pokemon game has been hailed for increasing physical activity in a group of individuals that have traditionally been seen ascouch potatoes. Since 1980, worldwide obesity has doubled. Likewise, people are spending more time sitting down. Pokemon Go is undoubtedly a great tool for boosting physical and mental health, and could probably claim to be the most successful health app on the market without even trying to be. But why is it so motivating for some, and how can we harness this power to change other behaviours?

Publication date: 11 August 2016

How should top athletes acclimatise for heat?

Top athlete preparing to compete in a hot climate have to acclimatise in order to achieve their peak performance in hot climates. They currently do this by moving to the country ten to 14 days in advance or by training in a climate chamber.

In recently published research, Prof Neil Walsh and his team at Bangor University’s School of Sport, Health & Exercise Sciences have shown that taking a hot bath after exercise in temperate conditions for six days can trigger changes in the body which mimic how the body adjusts to hot weather.

Publication date: 11 August 2016

How sports science research feeds into medical care

Three articles by researchers at Bangor University’s School of Sport, Health & Exercise Sciences appear in the latest issue of Arthritis Care and Research, an international journal published by the American College of Rheumatology. The latest edition is a special issue containing 18 articles focussing on state-of-the-art research on muscle and bone in the rheumatic diseases.

Publication date: 18 January 2012

How the ‘Santa lie’ helps teach children to be good little consumers

It’s that time of year – the season when parents, schools and retailers sell one of the most magical lies to children: Santa Claus. But far from being a harmless way to fire children’s imagination at Christmas, the “Santa lie” undermines children’s understanding of the world, their savviness and their real imagination in favour of wrapping them up in cotton wool and consumerism.

This article by Anne-Marie Smith, and Nia Youngboth of the School of Education was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 20 December 2016

How the snake got its venom

The venom of advanced snakes is a mixture of dozens of different proteins and is an example of an evolutionary innovation – a novel trait that has arisen in a particular animal group and which has contributed to their success. Understanding how these innovations come about is vital to understanding larger patterns of animal evolution and can shed important light on the genetic basis of differences between species, with clear implications for the effectiveness of treatment of victims of bites by venomous snakes, where venom composition varies both within and between species.

Publication date: 11 August 2014

How to achieve the best outcomes in bilingual education

With this years’ National Literacy and Numeracy tests for primary school children aged 6-14 across Wales just about complete, experts will be discussing the best way to educate children in a bilingual setting at a major international conference on Bilingualism in Education and will be making recommendations on how to ensure that the highest standards are achieved by children in all of their languages.

Bangor University is hosting the International Conference on Bilingualism in Education June 10th – 12th 2016.  This event, sponsored by the Coleg Cymraeg Cenedlaethol, draws together researchers and practitioners from a range of countries to discuss developments and best practice in bilingualism in education. 

Publication date: 31 May 2016

How to achieve the best outcomes in bilingual education

With this years’ National Literacy and Numeracy tests for primary school children aged 6-14 across Wales just about complete, experts will be discussing the best way to educate children in a bilingual setting at a major international conference on Bilingualism in Education and will be making recommendations on how to ensure that the highest standards are achieved by children in all of their languages.

Bangor University is hosting the International Conference on Bilingualism in Education June 10th – 12th 2016.  This event, sponsored by the Coleg Cymraeg Cenedlaethol, draws together researchers and practitioners from a range of countries to discuss developments and best practice in bilingualism in education. 

Publication date: 6 June 2016

How to take the pressure off the cost of our water supply

For most people in the developed world, getting access to clean drinking water is as simple as turning on a tap. Would that paying for water were so simple. But when we think about the water we consume, few of us realise that as much as 80% of its cost is associated with electricity use – a figure that’s as high in Britain as in drought-prone California.

This article by John Gallagher, Postdoctoral Researcher, at the School of Environment, Natural Resources & GeographyBangor University was originally published on The Conversation.

Read the original article.

Publication date: 25 September 2015

How trillions of tiny solar panels could power the internet of things

This article by Jeff Kettle ‎Lecturer in Electronic Engineering,  was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 9 November 2015

How we're using ancient DNA to solve the mystery of the missing last great auk skins

On a small island off the coast of Iceland, 173 years ago, a sequence of tragic events took place that would lead to the loss of an iconic bird: the great auk.

This article by Jessica Emma Thomas, PhD Researcher, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 10 July 2017

How will interacting with robots affect us? £1.5m ERC Grant

Robots and other types of artificial agents, such as avatars, are set to become increasingly commonplace in the near future - we’ll interact with them in workplaces, public spaces, and our own homes, as well as in education, health and care settings. Technologists have worked hard to develop useful machines to perform complex tasks in social settings, such as lifting patients from hospital beds, providing companionship for individuals with depression or dementia, or teaching children algebra.. But do we know whether long-term interactions with such robots might have any effect on us?

Publication date: 17 March 2016

I bet you wish this story was NOT about you: cheating in sport

What drives professional sportspeople to break the rules of their sport in the hope that they won’t get caught – and in the hope that it will bring glory to them and their team?

It’s all down to character type, according to researchers at Bangor University’s Institute for the Psychology of Elite Performance (IPEP).

Publication date: 16 October 2016

ICC expands definition of war crimes to cover combatants in the same armed forces

The international law of armed conflict seeks to protect civilians and those no longer taking part in hostilities from the worst effects of war. Serious violations of these laws covering armed conflict situations constitute war crimes. War crimes are a particular category of international crime, which can be tried by international criminal tribunals, like the International Criminal Court (ICC).

This article by Yvonne McDermott, Senior Lecturer in Law, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 23 January 2017

Identifying Reptiles at Risk

Dr Anita Malhotra of Bangor University's School of Biological Sciences is one of 200 leading reptile experts who has co-authored a paper assessing the extinction risk of 1,500 randomly selected reptiles from across the globe.

Publication date: 27 February 2013

Identifying the mechanisms that affect changes in snake venoms

Every year, snakebites kill up to 90,000 people, mostly in impoverished, rural tropical areas. This statistic is surprising when one considers that antivenoms are available, however, the truth is that the efficacy of antivenom is largely restricted to the snake species that was used in manufacture, and they are often ineffective in treating snakebite by different, even closely related species.

Writing in PNAS (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United states of America doi.10.1073/pnas. 1405484111) Dr Nicholas Casewell and Wolfgang Wüster of Bangor University  and colleagues identify the mechanisms by which the variations in venom occurs between related snake species and also the significant variations in venom toxicity that occurs as a result.

Publication date: 10 June 2014

Impact and Innovation at Bangor University

Bangor University has rewarded its finest and most innovative academics at the University’s second annual Impact & Innovation Awards.

These Awards recognise outstanding research and enterprise activities from across the institution, which have succeeded in benefiting the wider economy and society.

Publication date: 11 July 2014

Important piece of Health Service Improvement research begins

An important new piece of research about the best ways to incorporate patients and service users’ opinions to improve the Health Services has begun in earnest at Bangor University this week.

Publication date: 13 May 2013

Improved monitoring of endangered Ganges river dolphin revealed in paper by Bangor student

A new study (7th of May) reveals a method to improve the monitoring of the endangered Ganges river dolphin – one of only four remaining freshwater cetaceans since the Yangtze River dolphin became extinct in 2007.

Research author, Nadia Richman, is a scientist at the Royal Zoological Society and also a PhD students at Bangor University’s School of Environment, Natural Resources & Geography.

Publication date: 8 May 2014

Increasing Broadband capacity two thousand-fold - for the same price

Could you use a broadband service that is two thousand times faster, but costs you the same?  A revolutionary “future-proof” technology, first proposed by Bangor University, is the front-runner in satisfying future demand for dramatically increased internet speeds and capacity.

Publication date: 5 November 2012

Independence Day: what alien invasions tell us about current global politics

When Soviet communism disintegrated, political scientist Francis Fukuyama famously declared that it was “the end of history”. He argued that Western liberal democracy and capitalism had triumphed as the world’s only viable system, and though humanity would still face bumps in the road, the ultimate progression to this eventuality for all nations would prove inevitable, even if it took many years.

This article by Gregory Frame, Lecturer in Film Studies, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 27 June 2016

Independent music labels are creating their own streaming services to give artists a fair deal

Music streaming services are hard to beat. With millions of users – Spotify alone had 60m by July 2017, and is forecast to add another 10m by the end of the year – paying to access a catalogue of more than 30m songs, any initial concerns seem to have fallen by the wayside.

But while consumers enjoy streaming, tension is still bubbling away for the artists whose music is being used. There is a legitimacy associated with having music listed on major digital platforms, and a general acknowledgement that without being online you are not a successful business operation or artist.

This article by Steffan Thomas, Lecturer in Film and Media, at the School of Creative Studies & Media was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 18 August 2017

Inherent racism within bank credit systems reduces access to credit for ethnic minorities

As we await the publication of a government report into racism in British banks’ lending practices, research by one leading banking expert suggests that racism is rife and appears inherent in the bank lending system, and has existed through the ‘boom’ years as well as during the current and recent financial crises.

Publication date: 29 July 2013

Innovation in Armed Forces training

A project which has transformed recruitment training in the British Army and led to changes in the delivery of training across all three UK Armed Forces, has been highlighted at Bangor University recently, by winning one of the University’s first Enterprise and Impact Awards.

Publication date: 6 November 2013

Insight into snake venom evolution could aid drug discovery

Natural Environment Research Council press release

UK-led scientists have made a discovery about snake venom that could lead to the development of new drugs to treat a range of life-threatening conditions like cancer, diabetes and high blood pressure.  Most venom contains a huge variety of lethal molecules called toxins, which have evolved from harmless compounds that used to do different jobs elsewhere in the body. These toxins target normal biological processes in snakes’ prey such as blood clotting or nerve cell signalling, stopping them from working properly.

Publication date: 19 September 2012

International Addiction Experts head to Bangor University for Conference

International experts on addiction will be heading to Bangor University between 7 and 10 May to participate in a European conference on addictive behaviours being hosted by the University’s School of Psychology.

Publication date: 27 April 2015

International funding for environmental policies based on weak evidence

Tropical deforestation contributes to climate change, destroys biodiversity and can harm the interests of local people. Community Forest Management (CFM) has been promoted as providing a potential win-win solution (conserving forests while benefitting local communities) and global funders have invested billions of dollars in CFM programmes in developing countries. A study published this week, however, highlights the lack of evidence upon which such investments are made and calls for improved evidence collection in the future.

Publication date: 28 September 2011

Internationally renowned researcher and public health advisor awarded Honorary Professorship

Bangor University has awarded Prof Mark Bellis, an internationally renowned researcher and public health advisor, an Honorary Chair in recognition of his achievements in several areas of public health including violence prevention, alcohol, drugs and sexual health.

Publication date: 29 October 2014

International recognition for Food Dudes

The Bangor University academics behind the highly successful Food Dudes programme, which encourages healthy eating choices in young children and their families, are to receive an award for the way that they have adapted their scientific knowledge for a very practical purpose.

Publication date: 11 August 2011

Introducing modern morality plays on BBC Radio 3

Sue Niebrzydowski, Senior Lecturer in medieval literature at Bangor University’s School of English Literature is to be heard introducing a series of five modern morality plays this week (15-19 February, 2016) on BBC Radio 3. Covering moderation, envy, pride, wrath and justice, the five plays inspired by the genre of medieval morality drama explore how far contemporary attitudes to sin and virtue have changed.

Publication date: 15 February 2016

Investigating Elizabethan England from a European Perspective

A literature professor at Bangor University has been awarded a Fellowship more usually awarded to the sciences. Marie Curie Fellowships are among Europe’s most competitive and prestigious awards and are aimed at fostering interdisciplinary research, innovative academic training and international collaborations.

Professor Andrew Hiscock, who specialises in Elizabethan literature and its place within a wider European context, has been awarded the Fellowship which will see him joining the multidisciplinary team of renaissance researchers at Université Paul Valéry in Montpellier for two years.

Publication date: 10 May 2016

Investigating vital issues for the future of the Welsh language

A new research project is underway which will investigate why children who are attending Welsh-language schools may be reluctant to use the language outside of school. The research will be conducted by Dr Siôn Aled Owen based at Bangor University.

Publication date: 28 May 2014

Irish Ambassador visits Bangor University

Bangor University hosted Ireland’s Ambassador to the UK recently and showcased some of the ongoing research collaborations between Bangor and Irish partner institutions.

Publication date: 13 July 2017

Is a trend for pink chicken livers making us sick?

People are being warned to take the current trend for ‘pink’ chicken liver recipes with a pinch of salt. Research from Bangor, Manchester and Liverpool universities found that a current trend to serve ‘rare’ chicken livers is potentially exposing the public to the risk of campylobacter food poisoning.

Publication date: 30 August 2016

Is talking to yourself a sign of mental illness? An expert delivers her verdict

Being caught talking to yourself, especially if using your own name in the conversation, is beyond embarrassing. And it’s no wonder – it makes you look like you are hallucinating. Clearly, this is because the entire purpose of talking aloud is to communicate with others. But given that so many of us do talk to ourselves, could it be normal after all – or perhaps even healthy?

This article by Paloma Mari-Beffa, Senior Lecturer in Neuropsychology and Cognitive Psychology, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 3 May 2017

It’s not just “because it’s there”

Mountaineer George Mallory may have quipped that people climb Everest ‘because it’s there’. In fact, the reasons why people seek extreme sports such as high altitude mountaineering are far more complex. Sport psychologists at Bangor University are recognised world-leaders in establishing the psychological motivations for taking part in extreme sports.

Publication date: 29 December 2011

Joint working to help tackle anti social behaviour

A collaborative project between North Wales Police and other partners, which is aimed at tackling anti-social behaviour and crime has now gone live in two areas.  Working with Bangor University and the National Police Improvement Agency, North Wales Police have reviewed their current approaches in tackling anti-social behaviour.

Publication date: 17 January 2013

Keep a stiff upper lip when facing ill-health

People who can put on a brave face during adversity are better able to bounce back from illness, according to research conducted at Bangor University.

A positive outlook on life that fosters a sense of resilience could help you bounce back from the challenges of ill-health. 

Research examining how people respond to the various challenges of the ageing
process, found that psychological resilience is the key for maintaining mental well-being when dealing with serious complaints such as arthritis, diabetes and heart conditions in later life.

Publication date: 6 January 2011

King Arthur back home in Wales – thanks to Guy Ritchie

This article by Raluca Radulescu, of the School of English Literature was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

King Arthur is back at his mythical home – Wales. Guy Ritchie’s Knights of the Roundtable: King Arthur is currently being filmed in Snowdonia, starring Charlie Hunnan opposite villain Jude Law. This in the same week that Bangor University’s rare books collection boasts the extension of its Arthurian archive after a generous donation from Flintshire County Library.

Publication date: 20 April 2015

Landfill sites: not just a load of rubbish

Far from being a load of rubbish, landfill sites should be considered one of the great untapped resources in the search for new enzymes for biotechnology, and could fuel more efficient biofuel production.

A new research paper in mSphere (DOI: 10.1128/mSphere.00300-17) by biologists at Bangor and Liverpool universities has for the first time identified the enzymes which degrade natural materials such as paper and clothing in landfill sites.

Publication date: 22 August 2017

Large, violent animal packs impacted the ecosystems of the Pleistocene, team of scientists reports

Dr Matt Hayward, Senior Lecturer in Conservation in the College of Natural Sciences at Bangor University was part of a team that has identified the critical role that large predators play in controlling herbivores in ecosystems.

Publication date: 27 October 2015

Launch of €1.8 million Network to develop the Solar Energy Sector in Ireland and Wales

A new €1.8 million initiative to help develop and sustain employment in the economically important Solar Energy (photovoltaic or PV) sector has just been launched by a consortium of Higher Education Institutes, from Wales and Ireland. The ‘Wales Ireland Network for Innovative Photovoltaic Technologies’ (WIN-IPT) is part-funded by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) through the Ireland Wales Programme 2007-13.

Publication date: 25 October 2012

Launch of Bangor’s Centre for Arthurian Studies

Bangor University will be seeing in 2017 with the launch of a new Centre for Arthurian Studies on Friday 20 January, just as Wales begins to celebrate a Year of Legends. Throughout 2017 events will be held at historic sites the length and breadth of Wales in celebration of its rich culture and heritage.

Publication date: 11 January 2017

Law School Head invited to lead discussion at Institute for Welsh Affairs Conference on improving Welsh Public Procurement, alongside Minister for Finance and Leader of the House, Jane Hutt AM, Welsh Government”, Cardiff, November 5th 2012

Professor Cahill critiqued John McClelland’s report on how to maximise the Welsh pound in public procurement in Wales at the IWA on Nov 5th 2012.  The main findings of John McClelland’s very well written report is that, although the Welsh Government has developed excellent policies in public procurement, unfortunately, the Welsh Government procurement policies are not being fully accepted and implemented by a significant minority of public sector organisations in Wales.

Publication date: 21 December 2012

Leading experts share latest Mindfulness research

World-leading researchers into mindfulness will gather to present and consider ground-breaking research in this emerging field this week (3-7.7.15).

Organised by experts at Bangor University’s pioneering Centre for Mindfulness Research & Practice, at the College of Health and Behavioural Sciences, the event will discuss how mindfulness can bring benefits to individuals and society.

Publication date: 1 July 2015

LEAD Wales programme supports the growth of Welsh businesses

LEAD Wales, a project based at the Universitys Business School,  is well placed to play a leading role in supporting the growth of Welsh businesses, according to research published today (Tuesday 30 October).

Publication date: 30 October 2012

Learning the ‘rhythm’ of a language helps language learners become fluent

As Wales faces a decline in the number of Welsh speakers, it’s even more important that Welsh learners make the transition from second language learners to become fluent Welsh speakers.

One identified obstacle to ‘fluency’ is Welsh learner’s difficulty in replicating the sound of Welsh- not only the ‘ll’ ‘ch’ and other sounds unfamiliar to the English ear, but also the stress and rhythm of the language, which is different to that of English, and other languages.

Publication date: 2 December 2014

Leave your comfort zones behind you! Postgraduate ‘Beyond Boundaries 2011 – Transition’ Conference

Now in its fifth year, the latest Beyond Boundaries (BB)  conference brought together Bangor postgraduate students from across disciplines for a fascinating and valuable experience of engagement with non specialists. Organised by the Research Students’ Forum (RSF) and supported by the Academic Development Unit and Vice-Chancellor’s office, BB again provided that rare but essential opportunity to go beyond the actual ‘nose to screen’ research and share our experiences.

Publication date: 28 January 2011

Let’s produce really tasty, outdoor-grown tomatoes in Wales and the UK

One not-for-profit organisation, the Sárvári Research Trust, is working with experts at Bangor University to develop new  outdoor-grown tomato crops for horticulturists in the UK. The aim is to develop a commercially viable new strain of hardy tomato that would be resistant to late- blight, the disease or organism that usually spells disaster for any outdoor grown tomato crop. The same organism has caused potato blight that resulted in the Irish potato famine.

Publication date: 10 September 2013

Life for the Cherokee and the history of the Trail of Tears

In a three-part series on S4C, Professor Jerry Hunter travels to America to learn more about the history of Welshman Evan Jones and the Cherokee community of today. Evan Jones a'r Cherokee starts on Wednesday, 23 March.

Publication date: 18 March 2016

Life is out there: The benefits of outdoor activities

The most recent figures from the Welsh Government show that outdoor activity tourism in Wales is worth £481 million. Outdoor activity providers such as Surf-Lines need to continue to attract visitors and locals.

The number of people regularly involved in outdoor activities has grown in the last thirty years, and researchers have reported increases in self-esteem and other positive outcomes as benefits of taking part. In other words, taking part in outdoor activities provides significant psychological and long-lasting benefits. Surprisingly, researchers still do not understand why and how these benefits occur.

Publication date: 6 November 2014

Link between Dry Eye Disease and dehydration established

Health scientists at Bangor University have for the first time established a link between dry eye disease and dehydration.

Dry eye disease (DED) is a condition which can cause extreme discomfort and lead to eye damage.  While difficult to establish the full costs of this condition to healthcare and society in the UK, it is estimated that current prescription treatments such as eye drops cost the NHS £32 million per year (in England alone).  Because many individuals suffering from DED self-treat by buying over-the-counter medications (e.g. artificial tears) the true cost of DED is likely to be significantly higher. This new link suggests that ensuring DED sufferers are fully hydrated could alleviate DED symptoms.

Publication date: 5 October 2012

Livelihood projects designed to compensate for the local costs of conservation may not be reaching the right people

Conservation of tropical forests is widely recognised as a good thing: these forests lock up carbon which reduces the effects of climate change, contain biodiversity found nowhere else on earth, and influence local availability of water. However conservation can also have negative impacts on local people. New research shows that compensation schemes introduced to reach the poorest and most vulnerable are not always benefiting those they are meant to help.

Publication date: 27 January 2016

Longest-lived animals reveal climate change secrets

Researchers at Bangor University have used some of the world’s longest-lived animals to look at how the North Atlantic Ocean has affected our climate over the past 1,000 years.

Publication date: 12 June 2012

Longest-living animal gives up ocean climate secrets

Analysis of the quahog clam reveals how the oceans affected the climate over the past 1000 years

A study of the longest-living animal on Earth, the quahog clam, has provided researchers with an unprecedented insight into the history of the oceans.

Publication date: 6 December 2016

Looking at how our brain assesses bargains

It turns out that we may not be as good at bargain hunting and taking advantage of supermarket ‘offers’ as we think. That’s according to early results from a study which brain-scanned people undertaking a ‘virtual’ supermarket shopping trip to buy party-food.

Publication date: 21 December 2013

Looking into a dancer’s brain

Dance and psychology come together at Bangor University this week (14 + 15 February 2012). In an exciting boundary crossing piece of research, Dr. Emily Cross, a psychologist at Bangor University, will be working with internationally renowned contemporary dancer Riley Watts to study what happens in our brains when we watch complex movements.

Publication date: 15 February 2012

Looking to the future: Dementia and Imagination at the Utopia Fair

Dementia and Imagination, an exciting Bangor University led project which gives people with dementia an opportunity to get involved in art, will be one of a number of stall holders at Somerset House for their UTOPIA 2016 Fair.

UTOPIA 2016 is a collaboration between three London neighbours: Somerset House, Kings College, London and the Courtauld Institute and Gallery, in partnership with the British Library, the AHRC, the British Council, London School of Economics and Politics, M-Museum in Leuven, Guardian Live and Verso.

Publication date: 24 June 2016

'Love your body' to lose weight

New research published by BioMed Central's open access journal International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity shows that improving body image can enhance the effectiveness of weight loss programs based on diet and exercise.

Publication date: 21 July 2011

'Love Your Body' to Lose Weight

New research involving SHES senior lecturer Dr David Markland shows that improving body image can enhance the effectiveness of weight loss programmes based on diet and exercise.

Publication date: 18 July 2011

Lowest Diabetic Foot Amputation Rates in the World

Thanks in large part to Prof. Dean Williams, who is both Head of the School of Medical Sciences at Bangor University and a leading surgeon at Ysbyty Gwynedd, Bangor is leading the way in diabetic foot care with the lowest amputation figures in the world. In 2014 there were no amputations at the hospital in Bangor, even though it’s a known risk for people with diabetic foot disease, and the commonest cause for their hospital admission. The importance of this for those affected can’t be exaggerated and the BBC News Website features one patient whose story is typical of the positive outcomes being achieved.

Publication date: 16 September 2016

Major AHRC Grant awarded to PRoMS – 'The Production and Reading of Music Sources, 1480-1530'

Music manuscripts and printed editions from the 'Golden Age' of polyphony are to come under close scrutiny in a three year research project.

 

The Renaissance period has bequeathed upon us an unrivalled richness of musical sources. Manuscript from across Europe have survived - providing a breadth of examples from the large and highly decorated to the very small and unadorned copies of musical notations.

Publication date: 31 May 2011

Major European Grant Success for Law School

Bangor University Law School’s Professor Dermot Cahill and Ceri Evans have just successfully led a €4 million research grant bid (the WIT project), a collaboration with Dublin City University’s Strategic Procurement Unit led by Paul Davis of DCU Business School. This major award, announced last week against stiff international competition, will be funded until the end of 2013 by the European Union’s Ireland/Wales INTERREG Innovation & Competitiveness programme. Bangor University Law School will be the Lead Partner.

Publication date: 15 October 2010

Major Festival of Behaviour Change announced

Behaviour change is widely recognised as an essential tool for public services and organisations responding to the considerable contemporary social and demographic changes we are experiencing in Wales, and beyond.

A major Festival of Behaviour Change (#BehFest16) running for two weeks between 9-20 May at Bangor University, will showcase the latest thinking in applied behaviour change science, to individuals and organizations interested in learning about, designing, and implementing some of these behaviour change techniques for the benefit of their organisations or of the public at large.

Publication date: 27 April 2016

Majority favours assisted dying

New international research reveals that the majority responding to questions about assisted suicide, are in favour.  This contrasts with a recent review of research that suggests that UK doctors consistently oppose euthanasia.

The results, drawn from the views of over 62,000 people who contributed views to a large number of research papers on the subject from different countries, reveals for the first time, that people from very different backgrounds and experience, on the whole, share similar views on this topic.

Publication date: 5 November 2012

Major marine science boost for North Wales

A major £23.6m investment to grow Wales’ growing marine sector by increasing collaborative research projects between business and universities has been announced today (Weds 8th Sept) by Deputy First Minister Ieuan Wyn Jones.

Bangor University’s SEACAMS (Sustainable Expansion of the Applied Coastal and Marine Sectors) project has been given the go-ahead following EU backing of £12.6m from the European Regional Development Fund through the Welsh Assembly Government. 

Publication date: 8 September 2010

Major Prize Award Shortlist for poet of disappearing sounds

An internationally renowned poet, whose work is already translated into 18 languages, has been shortlisted for a major poetry prize.  is shortlisted for The Poetry Society's Ted Hughes Award for New Poetry.

Publication date: 17 March 2014

Major report identifies significant gaps and weaknesses in children’s health information

Children and young people who have chronic health conditions or need operations don’t always have access to the high-quality, child-friendly information they need to understand what is happening to them. That is the key finding of a three-year study funded by the National Institute for Health Research Service Delivery and Organisation (NIHR SDO) programme and led by Bangor and Cardiff Universities.

Publication date: 5 December 2011

Making Data Available for Research

SAIL and NWORTH Agree Strategic Collaboration

SAIL (Secure Anonymised Information Linkage) and NWORTH (The Bangor Clinical Trials Unit, part of the University’s School of Healthcare Sciences) have agreed to work together in a collaborative partnership. SAIL is a Wales-wide research resource focused on improving health, well-being and services

Publication date: 13 November 2015

Making full use of plant resources

Ivy, which grows abundantly in Wales, is just one of a range of plants being investigated for the fine chemicals and other valuable extracts and fibres that they contain. These materials are being explored in a biorefinery on Anglesey which could provide a model for future rural employment. The  research is looking for  viable replacements for current products and ingredients currently derived from crude oil, which are used across the manufacturing and construction industry.

The research and development work to provide new sources of fine chemicals and other materials is being done by a leading Centre at Bangor University. The focus of the BioComposites Centre’s work is on finding new uses for valuable natural resources, which we’re currently either ignoring completely, throwing away. 

Publication date: 12 November 2013

Masculine features support ‘extreme male brain’ theory of autism spectrum disorder

Recent research from Bangor University has revealed a new spin to a long-standing theory of autistic spectrum disorder (ASD).

The ‘extreme male brain’ theory proposed by Simon Baron-Cohen, speculates that ASD is a consequence of elevated pre-natal testosterone levels. In a study recently published in the journal, Clinical Psychological Science, Naomi Scott and colleagues at Bangor University’s School of Psychology investigated the possible implications this has for a physical appearance associated with ASD.

Publication date: 10 December 2014

Measuring success of peatland restoration

Bangor University are assisting the National Trust in an ambitious project to restore Wales’s second largest peat upland and a European-designated special conservation area.

A 400 mile network of ditches on the Migneint between Ffestiniog and Llanrwst will over time be filled in to restore the area to its natural state. Cut over centuries to improve drainage and provide more land for farming and grouse shooting, the ditches are possibly contributing to the release of carbon.

Publication date: 7 February 2011

Medieval Music Theory in Context workshop, July 2012

Second Workshop on Medieval Music Theory at Bangor University.

Publication date: 5 September 2012

Megadiverse hotspots under threat from logging

Areas currently facing the highest deforestation rates on our planet, have been identified as having been particularly important in the evolutionary history of the ‘megadiverse’ biodiversity of Southeast Asia.

Publication date: 7 August 2014

Menai Science Park makes planning progress

Bangor University is delighted that Menai Science Park Ltd has received outline planning approval from Anglesey Council for the bespoke M-SParc development.

Publication date: 18 May 2015

Micro-gels in Arctic and Antarctic pack ice

Since 2006 Professor Graham Underwood & Dr Shazia Aslam from  the University of Essex and Professor David Thomas from Bangor University's School of Ocean Sciences have led several projects (funded by the Natural Environment Research Council) to study the production of micro-gels, and their widespread importance to the frozen realms of the worlds oceans. They teamed up with colleagues from Australia and Canada to collect and analyse ice cores from both the Arctic and Antarctic. Seven years on, and many frozen trips later they are publishing a rather surprising finding – They, and their co-workers found that there is a strong relationship - spanning ice from both the Arctic and Antarctic - between the physical nature of the ice, the amount of microbiology it contains and the concentrations of gels.

Publication date: 10 September 2013

Micro-hydropower electricity generation could save the water industry millions

New research findings from Bangor University and Trinity College Dublin have highlighted the potential for further cost savings from micro-hydropower. Savings of up to an additional £1m a year in Wales alone could help keep water bills down.

Publication date: 20 August 2015

Microscopic marine biodiversity mirrors larger life

Distribution of microscopic plants and animals in our oceans mimics the distribution pattern of larger land-based plants and animals, research reveals.

Publication date: 23 September 2014

Midwifery reaches Stage 1 of the UK UNICEF Baby Friendly Initiative University Accreditation

The Bachelor of Midwifery programme at Bangor University has reached “Stage 1” of their journey towards achievement of UK UNICEF Baby Friendly Initiative (BFI) University accreditation. They are keen to be the first midwifery programme in Wales to achieve full accreditation.

Publication date: 12 May 2016

Migrating birds use a magnetic map to travel long distances

Birds have an impressive ability to navigateThey can fly long distances, to places that they may never have visited before, sometimes returning home after months away.

Though there has been a lot of research in this area, scientists are still trying to understand exactly how they manage to find their intended destinations.

This article was by Richard Holland, Senior Lecturer in Animal Cognition, School of Biological Sciences, was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 18 August 2017

Mindfulness-based contribution to improving health and well-being in Wales receive attention of Senedd members

Assembly Members and health and care professionals were invited to a reception at the Senedd in Cardiff today (3.12.13) to hear how innovative approaches to health and well-being  are being rolled out in Wales and elsewhere as a result of work by Bangor University’s Centre for Mindfulness Research and Practice.

Publication date: 3 December 2013

Mindfulness in Society Conference: delivered by Bangor University’s Centre for Mindfulness Research and Practice

Bangor University’s Centre for Mindfulness Research and Practice hosted a scientific conference in March 2013 in Chester entitled ‘Mindfulness in Society’. It was a three day conference with additional pre and post conference day long institutes.

Publication date: 17 April 2013

Mind the Gap: Mindfulness tops agenda as Shadow Cabinet Minister for Mental Health visits Bangor University

The Shadow Cabinet Minister for Mental Health, Luciana Berger spent the afternoon at Bangor University’s Centre for Mindfulness Research and Practice (CMRP) to meet with their team and discuss mindfulness in society.  Afterwards Ms. Berger introduced the Pro Vice Chancellor Professor Oliver Turnbull’s Public Lecture on Neuroscience for Psychotherapists.

Publication date: 20 January 2016

Minister breaks ground for ground-breaking development

Menai Science Park (M-SParc) took a leap forward in the construction of Wales’ first dedicated Science Park this week, with the Cabinet Secretary for Economy and Infrastructure, Minister Ken Skates attending the site on Anglesey to break the ground.

Publication date: 31 October 2016

Minister visits Bangor University’s School of Electronic Engineering

The Welsh Government’s Minister for Skills & Science, Julie James AM, visited Bangor University’s School of Electronic Engineering on Thursday (16 Feb). During the visit, the Minister was taken on a tour of the school’s state-of-the-art laboratories and was given a demonstration of the work undertaken by Professor Jianming Tang and his Optical Communications Research Group (OCRG).

Publication date: 17 February 2017

Mixing waters up in the Southern Ocean

The Southern Ocean encircles Antarctica and plays a key role in controlling the global climate. It is here that ocean currents return from the abyss to the surface, closing the global ocean overturning circulation. This circulation drives the poleward transport of heat, which is critical to the relatively mild weather here in the UK.

New research by Bangor University and the National Oceanography Centre, Liverpool, has for the first time identified a new process that contributes to this upwelling of abyssal water, a key component of the global overturning circulation.

Publication date: 1 December 2014

Modern archaeology to reveal Eliseg’s secrets

Archaeologists from Bangor and Chester universities begin a  second season of excavations (4 – 16 September 2011) at the Pillar of Eliseg, a ninth-century AD stone monument which stands on a prehistoric mound near Valle Crucis Abbey Llangollen, in north-east Wales.  There will be an open afternoon at the archaeological site on Friday 16 September, between 3 – 6pm.

Publication date: 31 August 2011

Modern Languages celebrates AHRC success

The School of Modern Languages has been two prestigious Early Career Fellowship by the AHRC for 2011. This success is particularly notable as it is very unusual for a school to be awarded two such Fellowships in the same year.  The successful recipients, Dr Helen Abbott and Dr Anna Saunders, will take up their Fellowships in January 2011. Head of School, Professor Carol Tully said ‘We are extremely proud of the work being undertaken by colleagues and these awards are an indication of the quality of research the School is able to boast.’

Publication date: 24 November 2010

Moving from children’s to adult palliative care services: Gap is still too wide for young people with life-limiting conditions to negotiate

The differences between children’s and adult palliative care services are too wide for young people with life-limiting conditions to negotiate, according to research by Bangor University. Commenting on the findings, the researchers call for adult palliative care services to extend their scope to better meet the needs of young people with life-limiting conditions and their families.

The research team brought young people with life-limiting conditions, parents and professionals from children’s and adult palliative care services together to share their experiences of transition.

Publication date: 21 October 2014

National Assembly for Wales pilots Academic Fellowships with Bangor University

Two Bangor University academics are to share their expertise to enable Assembly Members to develop policy and practice for the benefit of the people of Wales.

Dr Alexandra Plows of Bangor University’s School of Social Sciences and Dr Catrin Hedd Jones of the School of Healthcare Sciences will spend time working on specific projects alongside the Assembly’s Research Service under new Academic Fellowships being piloted by the National Assembly for Wales.

Publication date: 29 March 2017

Nation, Class and Resentment

Bangor University sociologist and lecturer Robin Mann discusses the differences in the way that national identity is expressed in Wales, Scotland and England, and how national identity  affects attitudes towards current issues such as Brexit and immigration in a unique comparative study, just published.

Publication date: 27 February 2017

Nature’s Backbone at Risk

The most comprehensive assessment of the world’s vertebrates confirms an extinction crisis with one-fifth of species threatened. However, the situation would be worse were it not for current global conservation efforts, according to a study launched today at the 10th Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity, CBD, in Nagoya, Japan.

Publication date: 27 October 2010

NERC-funded Envision Doctoral Training Partnership

Bangor University is a member of the prestigious NERC-funded Envision Doctoral Training Partnership (http://www.envision-dtp.org/), together with the Universities of Lancaster and Nottingham, and the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, British Geological Survey and Rothamsted Research.  

Publication date: 15 December 2015

New €7m EU investment in Wales and Ireland’s fisheries industry

Around €5.5m of EU funds will support the Bluefish marine science partnership, which will investigate the effects of climate change in the Irish Sea on the sustainability of fish and shellfish.

Led by Bangor University, in partnership with Irish and Welsh organisations, the project will assess how climate change is affecting the health of fish stocks, the migratory movement of commercial fish, and risks from new non-native species.

Publication date: 6 March 2017

New Ashoka rice variety brings food security to millions

Around a million smallholders and their families in east and west India are enjoying greater food security thanks to work by researchers at Bangor University in Wales.

Food security is a phrase that’s bandied about, but increasing food security can have real impact on people’s lives, and can come about by different means.

Publication date: 18 December 2015

New concept could lead to energy-efficient water supply technology

The water industry, their consumers and the environment could benefit from a new research project to assist the industry to cut its energy bills.

Researchers from Bangor University and Trinity College Dublin have identified a way of using water pressure within the water storage system to generate renewable energy. That energy can then be used by the water industry and sold to the grid.

Publication date: 8 June 2011

New DNA Sequencing reveals hidden communities

Half a bucket full of sand from an unassuming beach in Scotland has revealed a far richer and more complex web of microscopic animals living within the tiny ‘ecosystem’ than have previously been identified.

Publication date: 19 October 2010

New drugs may be better at preventing stroke

New oral anticoagulants that have been approved by NICE are at least as effective, and may be more effective at preventing strokes in people with atrial fibrillation than the widely used drug warfarin. This finding published in Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics (DOI: 10.1038/CLPT.2013.83) may help to inform decisions about treatment options for different patients who are at risk of strokes.

Publication date: 26 April 2013

New EU project to help grow the fisheries industry in Wales and Ireland

More than €1m of EU funds will be invested in a new project to support the growth of the shellfish industry in Wales and Ireland.

The Irish Sea Portal Pilot will investigate patterns of movement of shellfish in the Irish Sea to help reduce the costs of locating shellfish seed and help increase the volume of mussels and shellfish available to the industry.

Publication date: 21 February 2017

New extreme micro-organisms found in Siberian soda lake

Professor Peter Golyshin of the School of Biological Sciences, and expert in environmental genomics of microorganisms is the only UK author and participant in research which has discovered a new class of micro-organisms (archaea) that live in the extreme environment of a Siberian alkaline soda lake. What makes this discovery ground-breaking is that these micro-organisms can convert organic material directly into methane under such extreme conditions.

Publication date: 26 May 2017

New information makes it easier to ‘Think global, act local’ when conserving coral reefs

Coral reefs provide vital resources, acting as both feeding grounds for fish stocks and natural barriers protecting vulnerable coastlines, among other essential ecosystem services.

But they’re under increasing threat of ‘bleaching’ – when the symbiotic algae that live within the coral are expelled due to warmer sea temperatures, starving the coral of photosynthetic energy and weakening the viability of the whole coral reef structure in the process.

Publication date: 6 February 2017

New information network will support the development of marine renewable energy

We delight in the wonderful views and opportunities for leisure provided by Wales’ spectacular coastline. But being surrounded on three sides by water also offers other opportunities- to provide us with a sustainable source of energy, and in the process create employment opportunities.

SEACAMS 2 a £17 M three year project at Bangor and Swansea universities, part funded by the European Regional Development Fund, is an investment in the potential offered by the marine economy and marine renewable energy.  Through SEACAMS, companies wanting to harness the sea’s power and create a sustainable marine energy industry in Wales will be able to access vital research support they need if they are to be able to progress with their multi-million pound developments.

Publication date: 29 September 2016

New long-range micro backpacks for bees could provide vital information

Harnessing the bee’s own electrical energy is the solution proposed by an exciting new project to create a lightweight and long range bee-tracking device.

Bee populations, our vital crop and fruit pollinators, are in serious decline; their survival faces challenges on several fronts, insecticides and varroa mites to name a few.

Publication date: 14 December 2015

New means of safeguarding world fish stocks proven

Powerful and versatile new genetic tools that will assist in safeguarding both European fish stocks and European consumers is reported in Nature Communications (DOI 10.1038/ncomms1845 22/05/12). The paper reports on the first system proven to identify populations of fish species to a forensic level of validation.

Publication date: 22 May 2012

New more efficient method of sampling biodiversity showcased in major UK estuaries

Two of the UK’s major estuaries have proved to be a successful testing-ground for an effective new method of ‘health-checking’ aquatic biodiversity, which could lead to faster and more efficient sampling for other sites.

“Bio-monitoring” or assessing the impacts of human activities in the natural environment is often achieved by monitoring biological diversity.  Existing methods rely on manual identification, but that takes time, resources and often focuses on larger creatures, that sometimes may not be able to reflect accurately the health of particular habitats.

Publication date: 9 February 2015

New report urges governments to review the duty of collective worship in schools

The vast majority of state schools in the UK are required by law to organise acts of daily collective worship (England, Northern Ireland, Wales) or religious observance (Scotland) for their pupils. The majority of collective worship acts during any school term must be of a 'wholly or mainly of a broadly Christian character’, be concerned with ‘reverence or veneration paid to a divine being or power’ and ‘accord a special status to Jesus Christ’.

A multidisciplinary research team led by Dr Alison Mawhinney (Bangor Law School) has examined this duty and, at an international conference held this month, launched a report which urgently recommends that governments in the UK re-examine the obligation. 

Publication date: 25 November 2015

New Research Aims to Revolutionise Pollen Forecasting

A team of researchers are developing a new generation of pollen monitoring which they hope will lead to improved forecasts for thousands of the UK population suffering from summer allergies.

Publication date: 20 October 2015

New research centre to help shape services for Children and Families in Wales

Building on research that has shown how programmes for infants, young families and teachers across Wales, support children’s social and emotional development, a new research centre should provide further answers that will continue to help the Welsh Assembly Government shape services for children and families in the future.

 

The Centre for Evidence Based Early Intervention (CEBEI) will be launched by Huw Lewis AM, Deputy Minister for Children on Wednesday 9 March at the Incredible Years Wales Annual Conference in Cardiff.

Publication date: 9 March 2011

New research project addresses national priorities in combating the threat of tree diseases

New diseases are posing significant risks to tree health and plant biosecurity.UK Government Research Councils, DEFRA, Forestry Commission and Scottish Government, are together investing £7M to fund seven new projects to help address threats to UK forests, woods and trees.

Bangor University is a partner in one of these projects in collaboration with the Universities of Stirling and Cambridge and the Forest Research agency.  The project titled “Modelling economic impact and strategies to increase resilience against tree disease outbreaks”  will address “the protection and enhancement of public benefits, including biodiversity and ecosystem services (…) building resilience in woodlands, and wider landscapes”, which are the key recommendations that have just been made by the House of Commons’ Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee, specifically.  It will also make a substantial contribution the Committee’s call for “long-term research and development work that focuses on preparation for future plant health threats in order to ensure an effective response in the UK”.

Publication date: 26 March 2014

New research shows how nutrient management can improve farm profitability and agricultural impacts on the environment

Large increases in the price of fertiliser and pressure on the agricultural industry to reduce its contribution to water pollution mean that making best use of nutrients has never been more important. This was the focus of research conducted on farms across Conwy by scientists from the School of Environment, Natural Resources & Geography at Bangor University. The findings have just been published in a leading academic journal, “Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment”.

Publication date: 18 March 2014

New research to explore the public health impact of gambling throughout Wales

Problem gambling is a hidden public health issue in communities throughout Wales. It can have profoundly negative effects upon, not only the individual, but also families, friends and other social relationships.

Bangor University’s Professor Robert Rogers, an expert in gambling and problematic gambling, will lead a team of researchers and work with Public Health Wales to produce a report that provides more in-depth information about the extent and nature of gambling problems in Wales. 

Publication date: 25 May 2017

New ‘Safe Operating Spaces’ set to sustain world’s coral reefs

Leading coral reef science experts call for new ’safe operating spaces’ to be agreed to ensure the survival of valuable coral reefs for the future.

In a review article published this week in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, (Guiding coral Reef Futures in the Anthropocene doi 10.1002/fee.1427), which draws together all the latest knowledge on coral reefs, the scientists argue that, globally, we should agree ‘safe operating spaces’ or buffers in order to ensure survival of coral reefs.

Publication date: 3 November 2016

New species of viper identified

A group of Bangor University scientists have featured in the National Geographic this weekfollowing their discovery of two new species of snake in Southeast Asia.

Publication date: 29 March 2011

New study aims to give children with autism the best start in life

A ground-breaking new study has been launched understand how to support families affected by autism as soon as they receive their diagnosis.

The trial funded by autism research charity Autistica, will test whether offering the Incredible Years® parent supporting programme to families very soon after their child is diagnosed can result in long-term benefits.

Publication date: 20 October 2016

New study leads to calls to review past studies of brain differences between people with ASD and the general population

To better understand the underlying causes of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), psychologists have been using brain scanning to compare brain structures in people with ASD and the general population....

The latest research, led by Dr Kami Koldewyn, has now revealed how head movement during the scanning process can affect the results.

Publication date: 28 January 2014

New study to assess safe staffing levels on hospital wards

Bangor University researchers will be working with the University of Southampton on a new study to assess the implementation, impact and costs of safe staffing policies for nursing in acute trusts.

Publication date: 19 May 2016

New understanding of venom could open door to more effective antivenoms

New research, which disproves the theory that venom evolved just once in reptiles, could also lead to new medical treatments to counteract snakebite.

Publication date: 15 December 2014

New WHO recommendations: Optimizing health worker roles through task shifting

The World Health Organization’s recommendations on optimizing the roles of health workers aim to help address critical health workforce shortages that slow down progress towards the health-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). A more rational distribution of tasks and responsibilities among cadres of health workers can significantly improve both access and cost-effectiveness – for example by training and enabling ‘mid-level’ and ‘lay’ health workers to perform specific interventions otherwise provided only by cadres with longer (and sometimes more specialized) training. 

Publication date: 18 December 2012

Nitrous oxide from urine patches – it’s no laughing matter!

Commonly known as ‘laughing gas’ and currently used both in anaesthetics and as a ‘legal high’, nitrous oxide (N2O) is a powerful greenhouse gas produced in the soil by micro-organisms, especially so on land grazed by animals.

Publication date: 1 September 2015

North West Cancer Research earmarks multi-million pounds’ worth of cancer research funding at Bangor University

A charity dedicated to funding life-saving cancer research in North Wales has announced it will contribute £1.34 million to advancing cancer research at Bangor University.

Publication date: 14 September 2017

Ocean Mixing Experts head for Bangor

Experts in Ocean Mixing from across the planet are heading to the Marine Centre Wales at Bangor University for an International workshop on “Ocean Mixing” (11th – 13th July).

The scientists from as far afield as the US, China and Russia, as well as continental Europe and the UK, will be discussing global efforts to improve understanding of the processes which stir up the oceans and how those processes should be represented in weather and climate forecast models.  

Publication date: 11 July 2017

Ocean Oases: How islands support more sea-life

A 60 year-old theory to explain why seas surrounding islands and atolls are particularly productive has just been proven by a marine biologist from Bangor University’s School of Ocean Science, working with a colleague at the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Publication date: 16 February 2016

On a wild goose chase after the world’s highest migrant

The remarkable achievements of the world’s highest flying geese have been revealed by researchers from Bangor University and are reported in the prestigious American scientific journal:  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

Publication date: 31 May 2011

One of ten UK projects selected for Award

An academic at Bangor University’s School of Chemistry is one of ten British academics involved in British-Israeli research projects selected to receive funding through the Britain Israel Research and Academic Exchange Partnership, BIRAX.  The announcement of Awards to projects which tackle global challenges in Energy and the Environment was made recently by British Foreign Secretary William Hague at an event hosted by Britain’s ambassador to Israel Matthew Gould, celebrating scientific collaboration between the UK and Israel.  He hailed science as “one of the cornerstones of the relationship between Britain and Israel” and added “both are countries that have built up our economies and our identity through being leaders in science and technology”

Publication date: 6 December 2010

One of ten UK projects selected for Award

An academic at Bangor University’s School of Chemistry is one of ten British academics involved in British-Israeli research projects selected to receive funding through the Britain Israel Research and Academic Exchange Partnership, BIRAX.  The announcement of Awards to projects which tackle global challenges in Energy and the Environment was made recently by British Foreign Secretary William Hague at an event hosted by Britain’s ambassador to Israel Matthew Gould, celebrating scientific collaboration between the UK and Israel.  He hailed science as “one of the cornerstones of the relationship between Britain and Israel” and added “both are countries that have built up our economies and our identity through being leaders in science and technology”

Publication date: 29 November 2010

One step closer to the supermarket for project seeking to convert Welsh grass into sustainable food packaging

Prototype trials are underway for a university and industry-led project to convert Welsh ryegrass into sustainable food packaging.

Publication date: 19 November 2013

On her first birthday, Princess Charlotte already knows much about language

Princess Charlotte, the youngest member of the British Royal Family, is turning one. While there will be plenty of focus from sections of the mainstream UK media on the official picturesreleased by the palace, much has been going on behind the scenes. Many infants say their first word around the time of their first birthday and for most people, this is when language learning really starts. But by the time Charlotte says her first word, she actually already knows a lot about language.

This article by Anouschka Foltz, Lecturer in Psycholinguistics, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 3 May 2016

Opportunity knocks for UK's Supreme Court to become more diverse

This article by Stephen Clear, of Bangor University Law School,was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article

The UK judiciary has a long history of fairness, integrity and soundness of judgement – but not diversity.

In theory, the balance of judges’ ethnicity, gender and background should reflect society. Although there have been moves to improve diversity in the profession, the vast majority are still whitemiddle-classprivate-schooledOxbridge-educated men.

Publication date: 14 February 2017

OPSWISE – Improving the care of older people

A study led by Bangor University has provided a fresh insight into how health services for older people are carried out.

Publication date: 18 March 2016

Over consumption of sugary drinks dull our taste buds and our enjoyment

If your children are thirsty, encourage them to drink water- that would be the clear health message from research into taste preferences at Bangor University.

Publication date: 9 June 2011

Oxford Award for Bangor Professor

Tony Bushell, Professor of German in Bangor’s  School of Modern Languages, has been awarded a  prestigious visiting scholarship by St. John’s College, Oxford to complete a study devoted to the rhetorics of Austrian identity.

Publication date: 26 April 2012

Paris climate agreement enters into force: international experts respond

The Conversation asked a panel of international experts to give their view on the significance of the agreement coming into force. Among the invited contributors is Professor Julia Jones, Professor of Conservation Science at the School of Environment, Natural Resources & Geography.

Publication date: 4 November 2016

Participant Appreciation Day

NeuroSKILL hosts research participant appreciation day at Bangor University

The NeuroSKILL program hosted an appreciation day for community members who have participated in psychology research at Bangor University on August the 29th.  Patients and members of the local community who have been participants in research studies were welcomed to the Brigantia Building today, and through a series of informative talks by researchers and students at Bangor University told about some of the research taking place, and the results of these studies.

Publication date: 10 September 2014

Patients with mouth and oesophageal cancers take longer to seek help from GP

PEOPLE with cancers of different parts of the mouth (oropharyngeal) and the oesophagus are waiting longer between first noticing a symptom and going to their GPs compared to patients with other types of cancers, according to research* published in the International Journal of Cancer, today (Tuesday).

Publication date: 11 February 2014

People Anticipate Others’ Genuine Smiles, But Not Polite Smiles

Smile and the world smiles with you – but new research suggests that not all smiles are created equal. The research shows that people actually anticipate smiles that are genuine but not smiles that are merely polite. The differing responses may reflect the unique social value of genuine smiles.

Publication date: 12 June 2013

People with dementia benefit from goal-oriented therapy

Ninety people who are living with dementia and their carers from across north Wales, have contributed to new research findings which have shown that personalised cognitive rehabilitation therapy can help people with early stage dementia to significantly improve their ability to engage in important everyday activities and tasks.

The large-scale trial presented at the international Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC) 2017 on Tuesday July 18, found that cognitive rehabilitation leads to people seeing satisfying progress in areas that enable them to maintain their functioning and independence.

Publication date: 18 July 2017

People with dementia gain from learning self-management skills

People with early-stage dementia benefit when they are empowered to manage their own condition, a study led by researchers at the University of Exeter has found.

Research involving Bangor University and published in the journal International Psychogeriatrics, found that attending weekly ‘self-management’ group sessions which encouraged socialisation, discussion, problem solving and goal setting fostered independence and promoted social support amongst people with dementia.

Publication date: 25 January 2016

Pharmaceutical companies are profiting from rare diseases

Incentives intended to stimulate the development of more treatments for rare diseases are being exploited to boost the profits of pharmaceutical companies, new research led by Bangor University shows.

Publication date: 22 October 2016

PhD student Adam Pearce's translation of Daniel Owen's short stories published

Adam Pearce, a 125th Anniversary Ph.D. Student in Bangor’s School of Modern Languages, is the translator of a recently-published collection of short stories entitled Fireside Tales by Daniel Owen, widely regarded as the father of the Welsh novel.

Publication date: 15 March 2012

PhD student Sadiqa Riazat is published in interview with Martin Schulz

PhD student and 125Anniversary bursary holder Sadiqa Riazat has recently been published in discussion with Martin Schulz, who has recently been elected President of the European Parliament.

Publication date: 15 March 2012

Phosphorus is vital for life on Earth – and we're running low

Phosphorus is an essential element which is contained in many cellular compounds, such as DNA and the energy carrier ATP. All life needs phosphorus and agricultural yields are improved when phosphorus is added to growing plants and the diet of livestock. Consequently, it is used globally as a fertiliser – and plays an important role in meeting the world’s food requirements.

This article by Vera Thoss, Lecturer in Chemistry at the School of Chemsitry was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 15 March 2017

Pioneering research into benefit of computer games to treat Parkinson’s Disease

North Wales neuroscientists are researching the potential benefits of brain stimulating computer games in the treatment of Parkinson’s Disease.

The study is being led by researchers at Bangor University’s School of Psychology with Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board (BCUHB) and neurological experts at the Walton Centre in Liverpool.

They are studying the effects of touch screen “spatial reasoning games” on the part of the brain used to control movement in Parkinson’s patients.

Publication date: 25 April 2017

Planet Earth's adventure into cities cements its position as a pioneer of environmental film

With its depiction of sublime landscapes and unique creatures in a manner unsurpassed by other documentary series, Planet Earth II has been wowing millions over the last six weeks. Conversations overheard on the bus or in the supermarket queue have frequently featured prancing flamingos or those infamous snakes: a whole new generation have been introduced to the wonders of the natural world.

Planet Earth first debuted ten years ago, as Al Gore’s An Inconvenient Truth attempted to engage the public on the urgency of solving global warming. Meanwhile, David Attenborough was fascinating Planet Earth’s audience with stories about endangered species and remote places – trying to raise environmental awareness with a very different approach.

Publication date: 9 December 2016

Potential 'hot-spots' for sea ice melting identified in the Arctic Ocean

The Arctic region is warming up twice as fast as the rest of the planet. This rapid temperature increase has caused record-breaking seasonal retreat in Arctic Ocean sea ice in recent years. The latest minimum recorded was set in September 2012, while the sea ice cover in September 2016 tied with 2007 for the second lowest extent ever recorded. And it’s not just coverage that’s the problem, sea ice is also thinning, with a current average thickness of 3.2m in the Central Arctic.

Publication date: 26 October 2016

Prestigious Award for Honorary Professor

Prof. John Duncan (Cambridge) who is a honorary member of staff in Bangor's Psychology department has won the prestigious Dr. A.H. Heineken Prize for Cognitive Science for his innovative, multidisciplinary research into the relationships between psychology, behaviour and intelligence on the one hand and neural processes on the other

Publication date: 21 March 2012

Prestigious British Academy Award for Bangor Lecturer

Dr Helena Miguélez-Carballeira, from the School of Modern Languages and Cultures, has been awarded almost £90,000 to embark on a project that would make a case for studying contemporary Spanish culture and politics from a postcolonial perspective.

Publication date: 18 May 2015

Prestigious European history research grant for Bangor historian

Dr Katharine Olson, lecturer in medieval and early modern history at Bangor, has recently been awarded a prestigious Bernadotte E. Schmitt Grant for Research in European History by the American Historical Association

Publication date: 25 September 2012

Prestigious Impact Accelerator Account to benefit economic and social research exchange

A major award to Bangor University is set to increase the way in which the University shares economic and social sciences research for the benefit of society as a whole.

Bangor University has been awarded over £670,000 by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) one of the major research awarding bodies in the UK.

Publication date: 16 March 2015

Prestigious Research Fellowship awarded to Bangor Archaeologist

A prestigious three year Leverhulme Major Research Fellowship has been awarded to Professor Nancy Edwards, School of History, Welsh History and Archaeology

Publication date: 14 January 2015

Prof. Emily Cross at the European Research Council’s 10 Year Celebrations

Professor Emily Cross of Bangor University’s School of Psychology was invited to talk at the European Research Council’s 10 Year Celebrations Conference recently, where she shared the stage with some of Europe’s most eminent researchers.

Publication date: 24 March 2017

Professor Angharad Price named Best Playwright in the Welsh Language

Congratulations to Professor Angharad Price from Bangor University’s School of Welsh who was named Best Playwright in the Welsh Language in the Wales Theatre Awards 2017 held last Saturday (25 February 2017) in Swansea’s Taliesin Arts Centre. 

Publication date: 27 February 2017

Professor listed among world’s most influential researchers

Professor Jo Rycroft-Malone, Professor of Health Services & Implementation Research at Bangor University’s School of Healthcare Sciences has been ranked among the world’s most influential researchers.

One significant and important measure of academic research is how often academic research papers are cited or referenced in other academic articles. Prof Rycroft-Malone’s work is listed in the newly published Thompson Reuters Highly Cited Researchers 2014 list, which represents the world’s leading scientific minds.

Prof Rycroft-Malone is among over three thousand researchers from across the globe earning the distinction by writing the greatest numbers of reports officially designated by Essential Science Indicators℠ as Highly Cited Papers-ranking among the top 1% most cited for their subject field and year of publication, which has been judged by peers to be of particular significance and earning them the mark of exceptional impact.

Publication date: 26 June 2014

Project to scour 'microbial dark-matter' for new biotechnology resources : HORIZON 2020-funded Project ‘INMARE’ begins

In the first award to Bangor University from the major EU Horizon 2020 Program research funding stream, Prof Peter Golyshin will lead an international consortium of more than 20 partners from academia and industry from 12 countries, including leading multinational industrial partners, will work on a four year EUR 6M collaborative project. The project will mine for and use newly discovered microbial enzymes and metabolites, in particular for the targeted production of fine chemicals, environmental clean-up technologies and anti-cancer drugs.

Publication date: 20 April 2015

Psychological principles could explain major healthcare failings

A paper in the BMJ’s Journal of Medical Ethics breaks new ground by using psychological approaches and insights to review major health crises within the NHS.

Despite several complex and high profile inquiries into major healthcare failings in the NHS, mistakes reoccur and failings in patient safety continue. While inquiries describe what went wrong in each case, questions of how and why such failures happened remain unanswered.

In the research paper, Dr Michelle Rydon-Grange who has just qualified as a Clinical Psychologist at the School of Psychology, applies psychological theory to find new understandings of the causes that lead to catastrophic failures in healthcare settings.

Publication date: 15 October 2015

Psychologists reveal how emotion can shut down high-level mental processes without our knowledge

Psychologists at Bangor University believe that they have glimpsed for the first time, a process that takes place deep within our unconscious brain, where primal reactions interact with higher mental processes. Writing in the Journal of Neuroscience (May 9, 2012 • 32(19):6485– 6489 • 6485), they identify a reaction to negative language inputs which shuts down unconscious processing.

Publication date: 9 May 2012

Quantifying melting glaciers’ effect on ocean currents

A team of scientists from Bangor University and the University of Sheffield have used a computer climate model to study how freshwater entering the oceans at the end of ice-ages 140,000 years ago, affected the parts of the ocean currents that control climate. This is the first study of this kind for the time period.

Publication date: 20 May 2011

Quantifying the environmental cost of fishing on the seabed

Trawling contributes 20% of the global landings of fish caught at sea, hence it is an essential means of providing food for millions of people.

Bottom trawling is used to catch fish and shellfish that live in or near the seabed. Despite its importance, bottom trawling causes variable amounts of physical and biological change to seabed habitats, and can induce structural and functional changes in seabed communities. Understanding the ecosystem consequences of trawling is important so that we can reduce negative impacts on the seabed through appropriate management measures.

Publication date: 18 July 2017

‘Queenie’ scallops win Award with assistance from Bangor University

Support and advice from Bangor University’s renowned School of Ocean Sciences has assisted the Isle of Man ‘Queenie’ fishery to win the prestigious Billingsgate Sustainable Fisheries Award. And the future looks bright for the Isle of Man fishing industry. Once in decline, the now sustainably fished ‘queenie’ fishery is providing a high value product sought after by best restaurants around the UK.

Publication date: 14 February 2011

Raising a glass to the holidays

Asking people about what they drink on holidays and other special occasions shows we drink around the equivalent of 12 million more bottles of wine a week than we previously thought in England. Previous surveys on alcohol consumption have not accounted for all the alcohol that is sold. Research, funded by Alcohol Research UK and published in the open access journal BMC Medicine, appears to have found many of these ‘missing units’.

Also published today, an article "England's missing booze: 12 million more bottles drunk per week than previously thought" has been published on The Conversation. It was written by Christine Griffin at University of Bath and Mark Bellis at Bangor University

Publication date: 22 May 2015

Reaching out to reduce self-harm and suicide

While self-harm and suicide in European and American populations are well researched and the risk factors understood, much less is known about these behaviours in South Asia, where rates are very high.

Bangor University’s Centre for Mental Health and Society has been awarded a prestigious Research Council UK Global Challenges Research Fund grant to work with colleagues in India and Pakistan to address these issues. The project will be equipping local researchers with the skills they need to develop long-term programmes to reduce death, disability and distress.  The Capability Grant award is a key component in the UK Aid strategy to grow both the research base in the UK and strengthen capacity overseas. The aim is to address research challenges which respond to the expressed needs of developing countries.

Publication date: 21 July 2017

Recreated ‘Medieval’ Organ to complement Medieval Church

An unique musical instrument is being unveiled at St Fagans National History Museum on 8-9 April. The highly decorated organ, which has quite a different sound to the modern church organ, recreates the now lost medieval organ.

Publication date: 1 April 2011

Research Creates BBC Radio series for Remembrance Week

Researching conflict reporting has led to the producing of a documentary series which is being broadcast on BBC Radio Wales this month as part of their season of Remembrance programmes.

Publication date: 10 November 2011

Researchers meet in Ireland to discuss impacts of climate change to Irish Sea shellfisheries

SUSFISH researchers from Wales and Ireland recently met at University College Cork to discuss the impacts of climate change to commercial shellfish productivity in the Irish Sea.  Bangor University is leading this collaborative project, funded by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), which brings together experts from Bangor, Aberystwyth and Swansea Universities in Wales and the University College Cork in Ireland.

Publication date: 11 May 2012

Researchers reveal that sharks are hygienic

Scientists at Bangor University have shown for the first time, that sharks visit shallow tropical reefs or ‘seamounts’, to benefit from  cleaning services and rid themselves of cumbersome parasites.  The strategy is risky however, since by being there, they become vulnerable to interference from human activity.

Publication date: 15 March 2011

Researchers reveal that thresher sharks use tail-slaps to hunt

Scientists have shown that thresher sharks hunt schooling fish by bullwhipping their tails hard enough to maim and kill several prey at once, according to research published in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Dr Simon Oliver, Dr John Turner and Tim D’Urban Jackson from Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences, and Klemens Gann and Medel Silvosa of the Thresher Shark Research and Conservation Project in the Philippines.

Publication date: 12 July 2013

Research on effectiveness of Mindfulness reaches conclusion phase

Researchers at Bangor and Oxford Universities are drawing together the results of a major 5 year study, the results of which will be revealed later this year, into how effective the Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy programme can be in reducing the incidence of depression and suicidality for people with recurrent suicidal depression.

Publication date: 3 January 2012

Research project from Bangor University celebrated as Big Idea for the Future

Research selected for leading national report  

Groundbreaking work from Bangor University has been chosen as one of the most important research projects currently taking place in universities, with the publication today of the Big Ideas for the Future report.

Publication date: 16 June 2011

Research search for ‘invisible’ carers

There are thought to be over 70,000 people with a learning disability living in Wales today and yet only 12,000 or so are known to social services. This would, therefore, appear to indicate that many tens of thousands of people with a learning disability are living with family carers. 

Publication date: 13 March 2013

Revealing what lies beneath...

Have you ever looked out to sea from somewhere on the Welsh coast and wondered how that view would seem if the water was somehow magically taken away?  Well, thanks to recent results from a Bangor University project called SEACAMS, part financed through the Welsh European Funding Office, this has become a reality for some iconic coastal locations across Wales.

Publication date: 28 April 2016

Rhinos should be conserved in Africa, not moved to Australia

This article by Matt Hayward, Senior Lecturer in Conservation, at the School of Environment, Natural Resources & Geography was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Rhinos are one of the most iconic symbols of the African savanna: grey behemoths with armour plating and fearsome horns. And yet it is the horns that are leading to their demise. Poaching is so prolific that zoos cannot even protect them.

Publication date: 27 April 2017

Rocky platforms dissipating wave energy – a new option for coastal defence?

Communities across Wales are coming to terms with the very real threat of coastal flooding as the Welsh Government announces that as many as 48 areas have been identified where coastal defences will not be maintained in the long term.

With that stark reality in mind, scientists in Wales are contributing their expertise to obtain a clearer picture of the waves and storm surges hitting our coasts, so that they can gain a greater understand of the energy within waves and how a wave’s power can be dissipated.

Publication date: 25 November 2014

Roller Coaster migratory flights of geese give unique insights into bird physiology and biomechanics at high altitudes

An international team of scientists studying the migratory biology of bar-headed geese (Anser indicus), during their high altitude flights across the Tibetan plateau and Himalayan Mountains, have revealed how these birds cope with flying in the relatively low-density mountain atmosphere.

Publication date: 16 January 2015

Roller-coaster soaring flights of frigatebirds negotiate the doldrums of the tropical Indian Ocean

An international team of scientists, led by Professor Henri Weimerskirch of Chize Centre for Biological Sciences, CNRS in France, with collaboration from Dr. Charles Bishop, Bangor University in the UK, studied the movement ecology of great frigatebirds (Fregata minor). 
Their paper: Frigate birds track atmospheric conditions over months-long trans-oceanic flights, is published in Science today (1st July).

Publication date: 1 July 2016

Rolling dice reveals level of illegal badger killing

A little-used method for estimating how many people are involved in sensitive or illegal activities can provide critical information to environmental policy makers involved in the proposed badger culling scheme in England, according to new research.

“Innovative techniques for estimating illegal activities in a human-wildlife-management conflict”, a paper written by a research team from Bangor University, the University of Kent and Kingston University, has revealed - for the first time - the estimated rate of illegal badger killing.

Publication date: 17 January 2013

Sacred values are crucial for conservation of remaining forests in Ethiopia

Forests that are sacred to local people are less likely to suffer deforestation according to results of research by Bangor University.

Publication date: 4 February 2015

Safeguarding seafood by managing our seas

The increasing concerns about ‘food security’ for the UK, alongside dwindling public investment in fisheries research has led some to question how we can meet future knowledge needs to sustainably manage our seas.

Scientists at Bangor University's School of Ocean Sciences argue that despite their economic importance to the UK fisheries sector, not enough is known about scallop fisheries in the UK.

Publication date: 18 February 2014

Safety=Design: Saving thousands of lives and millions of pounds

A project launched in collaboration with Bangor University has the potential of saving thousands of lives by simplifying the way symptoms are identified by healthcare staff and patients.

Publication date: 30 March 2016

Santander Mobility Scholarships

Closing date for applications is July 12th.  Click here for more details. 

Publication date: 27 June 2012

Santander supports language research

A Santander Scholarship enabled Robat Trefor, a PhD student from the School of Welsh, to visit the Basque Country recently, and he was accompanied by Professor Peredur Lynch, his research supervisor and Head of School.

Publication date: 27 March 2012

Saving millions by giving babies in Wales the best start in life

Investing in programmes and services promoting the best start in life for our infants and children could deliver financial savings over the short and long term in Wales.

So argue health economists at the Centre for Health Economics and Medicines Evaluation (CHEME) at Bangor University in their report “Transforming Young Lives – The Economic Argument for Investing in Early Years” launched today (13th October 2016). CHEME is part of the University’s School of Healthcare Sciences and contributes to the Bangor Institute for Health & Medical Research (BIHMR) which brings together health research across the University.

Publication date: 13 October 2016

Saving our scallops: Arran reserve reveals marine protection works

An article by Bryce Stewart, University of York and Leigh Howarth, of our School of Ocean Sciences on The Conversation.

Last summer, on the Isle of Arran, off the west coast of Scotland, we watched an excited young lad walking down to the water’s edge, fishing rod in hand. Sadly, his chances of catching anything were slim to remote.

 

Publication date: 15 April 2015

Scallop Association funds collaborative project to help define English Channel Scallop fishery

A new industry-funded PhD research project is now underway at Bangor University to help improve understanding of the scallop fishery in the English Channel.

Publication date: 12 December 2011

Science Park preferred site announced

Menai Science Park has today announced that a 50 acre site at Gaerwen is the preferred location for the new Science Park to serve North West Wales. The site, currently owned by the Isle of Anglesey County Council was one of three sites on the island shortlisted by the Science Park project team.

Publication date: 25 September 2013

Scientists assess hydration potential of different drinks

Scientists at the universities of Stirling, Loughborough and Bangor are calling for the creation of a beverage hydration index to help people understand how different drinks can keep you hydrated.

A recent research trial which tested the effects of 13 commonly consumed drinks on urine output and fluid balance, found several fluids were retained in the body for the same time, or longer, than water.

Publication date: 1 June 2016

Scientists at work: tackling India's snakebite problem

This article by Anita Malhotra, Senior lecturer in ecology and evolutionary genetics at the School of Biological Sciences was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. 

Gerry climbs up to the veranda of our tribal longhouse with a snake bag held out in front of him. “Now don’t get too excited, but I’ve just caught a Kaulbacki,” he says, looking pleased but exhausted from a long hike and a six-metre climb up a tree. We gape, hardly able to believe that we have finally found this rare snake alive after four years of intensive searching.

Kaulback’s pit viper, first discovered in 1938 by British explorer and botanist Ronald Kaulback in northern Burma, is one of the largest pit vipers in Asia. On top of that, according to local reports, its bite is lethal. Despite being a co-author on the most recent paper on the species, I had never before seen a living specimen – few scientists have.

Publication date: 27 July 2015

Scientists predict sea states for renewable energy

Tidal and wave technology is finally coming of age and the UK leads the world in the development of this vital renewable energy resource. Bangor University is playing a crucial role in this: as the industry moves towards large-scale commercialisation, experts at the University’s Centre for Applied Marine Sciences are working to maximise the operational efficiencies of energy-generating devices.

Publication date: 11 December 2013

Sea urchins from Antarctica show adaptation to ocean acidification

A study of sea urchins from the Antarctic Peninsula has revealed an ability to adapt to changing conditions such as rising sea temperature and acidification. Writing in the Journal of Animal Ecology the authors set out to answer important and fundamental questions on how life in the ocean will respond to projected changes in the coming decades.

Despite evidence of increasing acidification of the world’s oceans, questions remain over whether marine species will be able to adapt to these changing conditions. This latest study, led by scientists from the British Antarctic Survey and Bangor University, is one of the longest ever conducted.

Publication date: 9 December 2014

Second body clock discovered in the speckled sea louse

Separate timing mechanism presents an exciting new perspective on how organisms define biological time

The diminutive speckled sea louse (Eurydice pulchra) boasts two body clocks, one for night and day and another for the ebb and flow of the tide, according to research published today, Thursday 26 September.

Writing in the journal Current Biology, researchers from Aberystwyth, Bangor, Cambridge and Leicester Universities have confirmed the existence for the first time of a distinct and independent circatidal body clock that follows the 12.4 hour cycle of the tide.

Publication date: 27 September 2013

Seeds of hope emerge across the world’s drylands

Drylands occupy 40% of the earth’s land area and are home to 2.5 billion people – nearly a third of the world’s population. People in dry areas are forced to contend with severe environmental degradation and increasing climate variability, aggravated by amongst the highest population growth rates in the world. A groundbreaking paper heralding a new integrated systems approach to agricultural research in the drylands, was published in the journal Food Security recently (18.11.13).

Publication date: 19 November 2013

Seeing the invisible: visible light superlens made from nanobeads

A paper in Science Advances (12 August) provides proof of a new concept, using new solid 3D superlenses to break through the scale of things previously visible through a microscope.

Illustrating the strength of the new superlens, the scientists describe seeing for the first time, the actual information on the surface of a Blue Ray DVD. That shiny surface is not as smooth as we think. Current microscopes cannot see the grooves containing the data- but now even the data itself is revealed

Publication date: 13 August 2016

Sêr Cymru National Research Network for Low Carbon, Energy and Environment

Director Appointed to the Welsh Government’s Sêr Cymru National Research Network for Low Carbon, Energy and Environment

Publication date: 24 February 2014

Shedding New Light on a First World War Classic

On Monday, 28 July, to coincide with the hundredth anniversary of the First World War, Professor Gerwyn Wiliams will be presenting a documentary which attempts to reassess one of the best novels written about the 1914-18 international conflict.

Publication date: 22 July 2014

Signposts for improving cancer survival rates in Wales

The findings of a new in-depth study of cancer could pin-point ways to improve cancer survival rates in Wales.
The results of the latest International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership (ICBP) study revealed today in the BMJ Open is the first to show that GP’s readiness to investigate for cancer – either directly or by referral to secondary care – correlates with cancer survival. In addition, the survey reveals that GPs in the UK and within Wales, were less likely in an on line survey using examples of clinical cases, to refer or investigate patients with possible cancer symptoms when they first present, compared with the other countries in the study: Australia, Canada, Denmark, Norway and Sweden.

Publication date: 28 May 2015

Simple precautions could reduce risk of E coli O157 in the environment say researchers

Researchers investigating the risk of E coli O157 in the countryside as part of the UK research councils’ Rural Economy and Land Use Programme, say that simple measures and coordinated action from the relevant authorities could play a major role in keeping children and other vulnerable groups safer.

Academics from the universities of Aberdeen, Bangor and Manchester and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, have been researching how the bacterium behaves in the rural environment, and the part that farmers, abattoirs and the public could play.

Publication date: 24 January 2012

Simple structured discussions and word games beneficial for people with dementia

Activities as simple as structured discussion groups and word games can benefit memory and thinking for people with Alzheimer’s or dementia, according to a systematic review lead by Professor Bob Woods, of the Dementia Services Development Centre Wales, Bangor University. The review also found that well-being also improved as a result.

Publication date: 15 February 2012

Slavery is a crime – it shouldn’t be up to consumers to fight it

‘Slavery is not a consumer choice. It is a crime against humanity.’ So writes Dr Nicola Frith, Lecturer in French and a specialist in Francophone Postcolonial and Slavery Studies at Bangor University's School of Modern Languages.

Publication date: 4 July 2014

Snacking and BMI linked to double effect of brain activity and self-control

Snack consumption and BMI are linked to both brain activity and self-control, new research has found.

The research, carried out by academics from the Universities of Exeter, Cardiff, Bristol, and Bangor, discovered that an individual’s brain ‘reward centre’ response to pictures of food predicted how much they subsequently ate. This appeared to have more effect on the amount they ate than their conscious feelings of hunger or how much they wanted the food.

Publication date: 26 July 2012

Social Science research improves quality of life and care for people with dementia

Research by Bangor University, which was carried out in several care homes in north Wales, is featured in a booklet launched in the House of Commons on Tuesday 15 March.

The latest issue of the Campaign for Social Science’s ‘Making the Case for the Social Sciences’ briefings focuses on a number of research projects on dementia at universities in the UK.

Publication date: 14 March 2016

Sound and vision piece inspired by dyslexia to feature on Radio 4 All in the Mind programme

A new sonic art work inspired by dyslexia and the science behind dyslexia is to be covered by Radio 4’s flagship All in the Mind programme, which explores the limits and potential of the human mind. The programme will be broadcast on Tuesday 18 December at 9.00pm and repeated on Wednesday 19 at 3.30 and will be available online after the first broadcast.

Publication date: 14 December 2012

Sourcing sustainable Irish Sea mussels

When the UK’s largest exporting mussel fleet heads out to sea later this month, it will be in search of valuable seed mussels that they will then bring back to the Menai Strait to grow on before collection for export.

If a new Irish Sea research project is successful, this may be one of the last times the fleet need to set out from Bangor’s Port Penrhyn to search for seed mussels.

Publication date: 17 March 2017

Spider silk: Mother Nature’s Bio-Superlens

Hot on the heels of a paper (Sci. Adv. 2 e1600901,2016) revealing that a team at Bangor University’s School of Electronic Engineering has used a nanobead-derived superlens to break the perceived resolution barrier, the same team has achieved another world first: using spider-silk as a superlens to increase the microscope’s potential.

Publication date: 19 August 2016

‘State of nature’ important in determining the impact of climate change

Current models of how vegetation will react to climate change do not consider the state of the vegetation - whether it is mature and stable, or already responding to some disturbance event.

New research from one of the world’s longest running climate change experiments, which is funded by the European Commission (EU-FP7 INCREASE infrastructure) and led by the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, and European partners, including Bangor University was published today in Nature Communications (24th March 2015, DOI: 10.1038/ncomms7682). The research suggests that for shrublands, the time since the last disturbance of the ecosystem affects its response to future climates and should be considered when predicting ecosystem responses to climate change.

Publication date: 24 March 2015

State of the Art Research Facility assists ‘Green’ industry

A £1M industrial facility, operated by the BioComposites Centre (Bangor University) on the Llangefni Industrial Estate at Mona, has been helping local companies test new eco-friendly alternatives to existing products.

Publication date: 28 June 2012

Sticky mud and biological goo hold key to predicting coastal erosion

Scientists have taken a huge step towards developing a more reliable way of predicting how climate change will impact estuaries and coastal environments.

Working as part of a collaborative project, led by Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences, to assess how fine materials such as mud and sand are moved by water currents around our coastline, and how this movement could change as the result of climate change, Professor Dan Parsons, of Hull University, has pinpointed key ingredients currently missing from the models which help scientists and engineers predict the way coasts and estuaries will be shaped in the future.

Publication date: 29 February 2016

Sticky Stuff - Ocean Sciences Research Grant to study ripples on mudflats and beaches

Sand and mud banks form important barriers around our coastline. Researchers at Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences are to lead a major research project to assess how these fine materials are moved by water currents around our coastline, and how this movement could change as the result of climate change

Publication date: 11 October 2011

Student project shows it is safe to eat roadside Blackberries

It is the time of year when many people pick fruit such as blackberries from roadsides. However, some fear that roadside soft fruits may contain high levels of heavy metals due to vehicle emissions.

A scientific study undertaken by student James Slack, of County Durham, as part of his degree in BSc Conservation & Forest Ecosystems at Bangor University, aimed to determine whether this was true.

Publication date: 9 September 2013

Students from across the world take part in 3rd Annual Visceral Mind Summer School at Bangor University

The Visceral Mind Summer School, running in the School of Psychology at Bangor University, attracted over 140 highly qualified applicants for the 40 available places. The summer school, now in its 3rd year, has proven popular with ambitious young researchers keen to share in Bangor Psychology’s world leading expertise in the field of cognitive neuroscience. The primary aim of the course, which is supported by the James S. McDonnell Foundation, is to redress an inadequacy of neuroanatomical knowledge in young neuroscientists, caused at least partially, by the limited availability of human brain tissue for providing this training to students outside the US.

Publication date: 10 September 2012

Study examines number of GP visits before cancer patients are referred to specialists

Study examines number of GP visits before cancer patients are referred to specialists

Patient information reveals women, young people, ethnic minorities and people with less common cancers have the highest number of pre-referral consultations

Publication date: 24 February 2012

Study reveals US turtles’ movements

A study of the movements of an entire sub-population of marine turtle has been conducted for the first time. The study confirms that through satellite tracking we can closely observe the day-to-day lives of marine turtles, accurately predicting their migrations and helping direct conservation efforts.

Publication date: 24 June 2011

Study shows the economic impact of Welsh universities is powering the economy in all parts of the nation

A newly updated study by higher education experts shows that universities in Wales are playing a crucial role in powering the Welsh economy. Welsh universities, together with the expenditure of off-campus spending by students and visitors, generated £4.6 billion of output in Wales. The higher education sector is shown to be one of Wales’ most valuable industries, creating tens of thousands of jobs and stimulating other economic activity in local communities, as well as the wider Welsh economy.

Publication date: 20 October 2015

Study to conserve genetic resources of wild tilapia for the future of fish farming

With world fish stocks dwindling, tilapia farming is a global success story, with production tripling this millennium.

This is now a $7.6bn industry, producing 4.5million tonnes of affordable high-quality fish every year. And it is sustainable, because unlike the salmon and sea bass we grow in Europe, tilapia don’t need to be fed lots of other fish caught from the oceans, but largely eat vegetable material and farmyard waste. Although now cultured throughout the world, tilapia originally come from Africa.

Publication date: 16 March 2015

Successful conclusion to Sustainable Fisheries Resources Project

A three year data gathering project to help Welsh fishers work sustainably culminated with a presentation at Bangor University recently.

Publication date: 3 June 2015

Successful workshop on careers in the Nuclear industry

Over 70 students from a range of disciplines including engineering, chemistry, environmental science, business, law, psychology and geography came together at a workshop held recently at Bangor University to learn about careers in the nuclear industry. The workshop was held in partnership with Horizon Nuclear Power, National Skills Academy for Nuclear (NSAN), and the Nuclear Graduates Programme.  

Publication date: 12 May 2015

Supporting the reds!

Bangor University’s School of Environment, Natural Resources & Geography and School of Biological Sciences are working with partners to support the reintroduction of red squirrels to the Ogwen Vally in nearby Bethesda, Gwynedd.

Publication date: 12 June 2017

Taboo: working for the East India Company could make you rich ... or dead

This article by Lowri Ann Rees, Lecturer in Modern History, was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

BBC1’s latest historical drama certainly brings something different to the table. Taboo is dark, menacing, violent and at times shocking. In episode one we see James Delaney (played by Tom Hardy at his swaggering best), thought long dead and gone, suddenly return home from his travels overseas. His arrival is dramatic, to say the least. As he comes bursting through the church doors in the middle of his late father’s funeral service, the congregation is shocked to see the returned son.

A key player in this intriguing story is the East India Company. What started as a trading company in 1600 became a powerful imperial interest, with substantial commercial and political influence which ruled over India from the late 18th century. Tales of misconduct, dishonest dealings and exploitation abounded. The famous impeachment trial of Warren Hastings during the 1780s and 1790s reinforced contemporary perceptions of a corrupt and unscrupulous organisation.

Publication date: 10 February 2017

Teaching students to survive a zombie apocalypse with psychology

In this article originally published on The ConversationJohn A Parkinson, Professor in Behavioural Neuroscience, and Rebecca Sharp, Senior Lecturer in Psychology, both of  the School of Psychology, describe hhow and why they 'gamified' an undergraduate course in behavioural psychology. 

Read the original article

 

Publication date: 22 May 2017

Teaming up for cheaper energy from ocean tides

Oceanographers at Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences are launching a major project to study tidal turbulence at the Menai Strait in Wales. Just how can this project help reduce development costs, leading to cheaper energy from the tides?

Ocean energy represents a vast and largely untapped renewable energy resource. The global market for marine energy has been estimated to be worth around £76 billion between 2016 and 2050, according to numbers released by the Carbon Trust.

To access this source of energy, oceanographers at Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences have been awarded two major grants totalling £230k to study ocean turbulence. The aim is to help improve the design and operation of tidal energy capture devices.

Publication date: 25 April 2017

Tech firms want to detect your emotions and expressions, but people don't like it

As revealed in a patent filing, Facebook is interested in using webcams and smartphone cameras to read our emotions, and track expressions and reactions. The idea is that by understanding emotional behaviour, Facebook can show us more of what we react positively to in our Facebook news feeds and less of what we do not – whether that’s friends’ holiday photos, or advertisements.

This might appear innocuous, but consider some of the detail. In addition to smiles, joy, amazement, surprise, humour and excitement, the patent also lists negative emotions. Possibly being read for signs of disappointment, confusion, indifference, boredom, anger, pain and depression is neither innocent, nor fun.

This article by Andrew McStay, Reader in Advertising and Digital Media, School of Creative Studies & Media Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 27 June 2017

Tens of thousands of dead fish just washed up on a Cornish beach – here's why

This article by Prof Michel KaiserSchool of Ocean Sciences was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

It must have been an incredibly morbid sight. Walkers on Marazion beach in Cornwall, at the south-western tip of mainland Britain, recently discovered tens of thousands of dead fish had been washed ashore overnight. One eyewitness told the Plymouth Herald the fish stretched “as far as the eye could see”.

People speculated that pollution or natural predators such as dolphins or porpoises chasing the fish ashore may be to blame. But a much simpler explanation soon unfolded when the Cornish Sardine Management Association said that one of its vessels had been fishing close inshore and had had to release one of its catches for safety reasons.

Exactly what happened in this case remains unclear. But why would a ship ever need to dump fish for safety reasons? After all, catching lots of fish is surely the entire point. In any case, a European Union discard ban was first implemented in 2015 in order to stop this sort of thing.

Publication date: 22 December 2016

Testing an effective Anti-bullying programme for Wales

A research centre at Bangor University, which has been instrumental in researching and introducing new and innovative services for children and their families that have been adopted across Wales, is now turning its attention to the problem of school bullying.

Publication date: 23 October 2013

The African lion: what faster decline of apex predator means for ecosystems

This article by Matt HaywardSenior Lecturer in Conservation in the College of Natural Sciences, was originally published on The ConversationRead the original article.

There is nothing as awe-inspiring as watching the brutal power of a lion capturing its prey. At close range, their throaty roars thump through your body, raising a cold sweat triggered by the fear of what these animals are capable of doing now, and what they once did to our ancestors. They are the most majestic animals left on our planet, and yet we are currently faced with the very real possibility that they will be functionally extinct within our lifetime.

Publication date: 27 October 2015

The alcohol harm paradox explained

New research from a collaboration including Bangor University, Liverpool John Moores University and Alcohol Research UK explains why people in deprived communities have higher levels of alcohol-related ill health than people in non-deprived communities, despite drinking the same amounts of alcohol – the alcohol harm paradox. 

Publication date: 18 February 2016

The ATM at 50: how a hole in the wall changed the world

Next time you withdraw money from a hole in the wall, consider singing a rendition of happy birthday. For on June 27, the Automated Teller Machine (or ATM) celebrates its half century. Fifty years ago, the first cash machine was put to work at the Enfield branch of Barclays Bank in London. Two days later, a Swedish device known as the Bankomat was in operation in Uppsala. And a couple of weeks after that, another one built by Chubb and Smith Industries was inaugurated in London by Westminster Bank (today part of RBS Group).

This article by Bernardo Batiz-Lazo, Professor of Business History and Bank Management, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 26 June 2017

The latest developments in solar energy to be highlighted at Bangor University

Bangor University's School of Electronic Engineering will host to the Solar Energy Society’s PVSAT 13 (Photovoltaic Science, Application and Technology) conference this month (5-7 April), bringing together the brightest and best scientists in the field of solar for the most important conference on solar energy research in the UK.

Around 5% of our electricity is produced from solar energy in the UK, with a 25% increase in solar energy production in recent years and a constantly reducing production cost, solar is one of the cheapest forms of energy production so the future looks bright for solar. It remains a popular research area in the science and engineering sector of UK universities.

Publication date: 3 April 2017

The men who impersonate military personnel for stolen glory

This article by Leanne Simpson, PhD Candidate, School of Psychology | Institute for the Psychology of Elite PerformanceBangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article

In 2009, a 61-year-old man joined an annual Remembrance Day parade wearing an impressive array of medals. So impressive in fact that an expert said their awarding would have made him “world famous – and some sort of Rambo character”. After he was tracked down, the man, later named as Roger Day, claimed his medals were “pukka” but his story was denounced by military personnel and the public alike

Publication date: 7 November 2016

The neuroscience of erogenous zones

Our erogenous zones are a little odd. There are certain areas of our bodies, which if touched gently, create erotic feelings, while other adjacent body parts do not. For example a woman may enjoy having her neck or ear lobe stroked, but not her cheek or forehead. Why is that?

Publication date: 10 September 2013

The #nomakeupselfie phenomenon

A psychologist at Bangor University has been fascinated by the the #nomakeupselfie social media phenomenon seen on social media this week.

Publication date: 21 March 2014

The oyster is their world- now they want you to consider the oyster

Aquaculture experts at Bangor University are hoping to initiate a sea-change in how oysters are considered and consumed at an international Oyster Symposium being held at the University (11-14 September). They hope that the event will encourage a rapid but sustainable increase in oyster production and consumption- at home and at oyster bars here in Wales and elsewhere.

Publication date: 30 August 2017

The part–time way to post-graduate education

In these tougher times, studying for a postgraduate degree part-time while remaining at work is an option at Bangor University.

Bangor University’s next Postgraduate Courses Fair takes place on Friday 18 February 2011 between 12.30 – 2.30. Anybody interested in postgraduate study at Bangor is most welcome to attend, and take advantage of the opportunity to learn more about the many different postgraduate programmes that are currently available. Pre-register for the event online via the University’s website at: http://www.bangor.ac.uk/pgfair/contactus.php.en

Publication date: 16 February 2011

The quiet battle to save multilingualism in Europe

This article by Marco Tamburelli, of the School of Linguistics & English Language,  Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

It is now well known that growing up with two or more languages brings a wealth of cognitive advantages. Multilingualism is not only a laudable achievement in a tolerant society, it is also of great social benefit to individuals. It has been repeatedly demonstrated that bilinguals are better at focusing their attention, they are less easily distracted, they have increased mental flexibility, and show slower rates of mental decline in old age.

Publication date: 9 May 2016

There are no two ways about it, grey squirrels are bad for the British countryside

According to some animal rights groups the grey squirrel is a victim of circumstance. They say it has been made a scapegoat for regional red squirrel population extinctions and claim that loss of the reds is caused entirely coincidentally by habitat change. They suggest the true facts are being hidden and scientific research being intentionally misinterpreted.

This article by Craig Shuttleworth, Honorary Visiting Research Fellow, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 6 April 2017

There may be more influencing your exercise endurance than you think

Now that we’re in to February, are you struggling to stick to your New Year’s resolution exercise plan? There may be more to your success or failure than meets the eye.

Researchers at Bangor University and the University of Kent have found that being shown positive or negative images subliminally, or so fleetingly that you’re not even aware of having seen them, had an effect on when individuals reached their point of exhaustion while exercising.

Publication date: 6 February 2015

The secret life of Lugworms – ‘citizen scientists’ needed to help shed light on the sex-life of this important coastal species

Love is in the air along our coastlines this autumn and Bangor University is asking people in north Wales to keep an eye out for signs of passion in the lugworm population.

The lugworm – Arenicola marina - is a vital source of food for wader birds and fish, and the species plays an important role in fisheries as a source of bait.

Publication date: 28 September 2016

The truth about the links between military service and crime

This article by Leanne K Simpson, PhD Candidate, School of Psychology | Institute for the Psychology of Elite Performance, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

The transition back to civilian life is a challenging period for military personnel – particularly when coupled with one or more of the well-publicised problems faced by veterans, including mental health issues, skills translation and the stigma surrounding military service.

In addition, there are several myths regarding the apparently inevitable transition from military service to a life of crime. These are, at best, unhelpful.

Publication date: 27 April 2016

The vision of a new North Wales coast to harness power, protect the shoreline and boost tourism

Just imagine a major wall off the North Wales coast stretching from Llandudno, out to sea and then back to land near Prestatyn: sailing dinghies and wind surfers enjoying the calm waters within, thriving tourism, and support industries and local communities alleviated from the threat of coastal flooding.

Publication date: 4 April 2016

The Welsh Language and Volunteering

Research by Bangor University’s School of Social Sciences and Wales Council for Voluntary Action has underlined how important it is to have a healthy voluntary sector that can meet the needs of a bilingual Wales. The research, conducted on behalf of the Welsh Language Commissioner, draws attention to the importance of attracting bilingual volunteers to offer activities and provide services to the public in Wales. The work has also highlighted potential areas of improvement on current provision and opportunities.

Publication date: 23 July 2014

Think twice about who you chose as leader: narcissists are initially appealing but don’t deliver in the long term

From events such as the Rugby World Cup to party politics, coaches, captains and party leaders are in the spotlight.

Leadership is an important aspect of everyday life as well, and we all choose leaders or at least, work with leaders.  For example, we know who is “boss” in the workplace, who is “captain” at Sunday footie, and who at home is “in charge”.

Publication date: 21 October 2015

Three Bangor research projects among top 20 contributing towards development

No fewer than three research projects at Bangor University have been selected from nearing 7,000 submissions to be included among the top 20 most impressive examples of UK research contributing to development.  

Publication date: 9 October 2015

Three new Bangor academics among Sêr Cymru talent welcomed by Minister

Three new Bangor University academics were among the latest tranche of international research Fellows and Chairs welcomed to Wales at a special reception in Cardiff last night [27 February 2017] to celebrate Sêr Cymru investments and the start of the second phase of the programme.

Publication date: 28 February 2017

Through revolutionary methods . . . ? A conference to evaluate five decades of language campaigning.

On Friday and Saturday 16-17 November, the School of Welsh at Bangor – in conjunction with Aberystwyth University’s Institute of Welsh Politics (and with the financial support of the Coleg Cymraeg Cenedlaethol) – will host a major interdisciplinary conference in order to evaluate the influence of more than fifty years of language campaigning on the political and cultural life of Wales.

Publication date: 13 November 2012

Tides stir up deep Atlantic Heat in the Arctic Ocean

Researchers have identified how warm Atlantic water that is flowing deep into the Arctic Ocean is mixing with colder waters above to contribute to sea-ice loss in the Arctic. The results, published this week in the journal Nature Geoscience (16.2.14 10.1038/ngeo2350 ), show that tidal flows in the Arctic are causing deep, warm water (originating from the Gulf Stream) to mix with cold, fresh water lying above, in turn contributing to melting the floating sea-ice.

Publication date: 16 February 2015

Tiny organisms could change the face of coastal science

New scientific research published in the journal Nature Communications, led by researchers at Bangor University in collaboration with scientists from the National Oceanography Centre Liverpool and the Universities of St. Andrews, Hull, Leeds and Plymouth, has discovered that ‘sticky’ sugars produced by micro-organisms have a remarkably large effect on the movement of sand and mud in aquatic environments.

Publication date: 6 February 2015

Too many sugary drinks can dull taste buds and enjoyment

New research undertaken by Dr Hans-Peter Kubis and his team, has shown for the first time that overweight and obese people have a dulled sensitivity to soft drinks but enhanced subconscious liking of sweet as a taste.

Publication date: 8 June 2011

Translating public health economics research into policy and practice

A public health economics expert has highlighted research suggesting that investing in early years has the potential to save millions of pounds across public sectors in Wales, to the National Assembly for Wales ’Children, Young People and Education Committee consultation on the ‘First 1,000 Days’ .

Publication date: 6 February 2017

Trash to cash: killing two birds with one stone in Bangladesh

Municipal waste can be used to provide a valuable source of nutrients for intensively farmed soils in Bangladesh- with the effect of both improving agriculture and crop yields and removing unhygienic waste materials from city streets.

Publication date: 22 March 2012

Trawling makes for skinny flatfish

Trawling the seabed doesn’t just remove some of the fishes living there; it also makes some of the survivors thinner and less healthy by forcing them to use more energy finding less nutritious food.

That’s the conclusion of a new paper published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, based on the work Dr Andrew Frederick Johnson undertook while studying for his PhD at Bangor University. “We already knew that some species of bottom-dwelling fish in trawled areas were skinnier than those elsewhere, based on earlier work by Dr Jan Geert Hiddink (2011, Journal of Applied Ecology), but until now it was assumed this was because they couldn’t find enough food and went hungry”.

Publication date: 11 December 2014

Trump's victory shows that people don't always vote for what is best for their wallet

One of the supposed attractions of a first-past-the-post electoral system is that political leaders have to embrace the centre ground to win. Donald Trump’s victory has turned that on its head – and with it the assumption that voters will make rational choices based on what is best for their own circumstances, and without regard for how others fare.

This article by Shanti P Chakravarty, Emeritus Professor of Economics, Bangor University Business School was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 15 November 2016

Two prestigious RCBC awards for Bangor’s Institute for Health and Medical Research

BIHMR is delighted that Robert Goldsmith, NHS Physiotherapist based in Cardiff, and Patricia Masterson-Algar, a rehabilitation postgraduate researcher in Bangor University’s School of Healthcare Sciences, have both been successful in attracting Welsh Government RCBC Wales funding aimed at increasing collaboration and research capacity in nursing, midwifery and the allied health professions across Wales.

Publication date: 14 June 2017

Two world-renowned documentary makers come to Bangor

Two world-renowned documentary makers will be amongst the speakers at the biannual Cyfrwng conference at Bangor University this week.

Publication date: 22 July 2014

Uganda fails to fill its honey-pot

Despite the large economic potential for honey production, many beekeepers in Uganda fail to produce and market enough honey to make a living from it.  

Researchers comparing the household economies of marginal farmers in Uganda, have found that honey adds to the household income of many beekeepers yet this impact is still limited. Beehives were donated to poor households in the communities for them to improve their livelihoods given the lack of alternative income generating activities and the adverse effects of climate change on their traditional agricultural production.

Publication date: 7 March 2017

UK on verge of steep lung disease rise in young adults - due to heavy spliff smoking?

The UK needs to be prepared for a steep rise in the number of young  adults affected by a severe form of lung disease due to their regular cannabis and tobacco use - lung specialists will tell the British Thoracic Society Winter Meeting on Wednesday 3rd December.

Publication date: 10 December 2014

Understanding the conditions that foster coral reefs' caretaker fishes

This article by Adel HeenanNational Oceanic and Atmospheric AdministrationAndrew HoeyJames Cook UniversityGareth J. WilliamsSchool of Ocean Sciences Bangor University, and Ivor D. WilliamsNational Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Coral reefs are among the most valuable natural assets on Earth. They provide an estimated US$375 billion worth of goods and services every year, such as supporting fisheries and protecting coasts. But reefs face many stresses and shocks, from local threats like overfishing, habitat damage and pollution to the global impacts of climate change. Many scientists are working to identify management strategies that can effectively buffer reefs against the array of threats that challenge them.

Publication date: 30 November 2016

Underwater-world software developed for launch of new Samsung Gear VR mobile device

Bangor University Lecturer Dr Llyr Ap Cenydd from the School of Computer Science has been working on a top secret project with Samsung and Oculus to develop an app called “Ocean Rift” that is expected to launch alongside  the new Samsung Gear VR mobile device.

Publication date: 30 October 2014

University Launches £3.2 million Project Set to Boost Economic Growth

Bangor University Law School has officially launched a £3.2 million project that is set to encourage economic growth in Wales and Ireland.

Publication date: 18 July 2011

University partnership pays long-term benefits for innovative company

One of Wales’ innovative medical supplies companies can trace a period of exponential growth which saw the company turnover increase by 400% and grow from 5 to 65 employees, to a critical partnership with Bangor University.

Publication date: 4 March 2014

University researchers seek feedback from older carers of people with dementia

People aged 65 and over who have experience of looking after somebody with dementia can contribute towards research currently being carried out by academics at Bangor University.  Health economists there are investigating the economic demands of caring for people with dementia. The results of their research will contribute towards shaping health and social care policies across the UK.

Publication date: 15 December 2011

University research showcased at event celebrating social sciences in society

Case studies from Bangor University are featured in a new publication which celebrates research undertaken by social science researchers in Wales. ‘Making the Case for the Social Sciences 10: Wales’ is published by the Academy of Social Sciences as part of its Campaign for Social Science.

The publication comprises 14 case studies of research carried out by Welsh institutions which have influenced national and international governments, as well as highlighting the benefits of social science research on public policy.

Publication date: 27 November 2015

Unpublished Poems by R.S. Thomas come to light

A collection of previously unpublished poems by the major Welsh poet R.S. Thomas has just been published under the editorship of Professor Tony Brown (School of English Literature) and Professor Jason Walford Davies (School of Welsh), the Co-directors of the University’s  R.S. Thomas Research Centre, the major archive of the poet’s work.

Publication date: 3 November 2016

Unused energy sources could contribute to farm sustainability

Parts of the British agriculture industry could be generating their own energy from a source right under their noses and make a valuable contribution to wider society while they’re at it.

That‘s the conclusion of a PhD conducted by John Walsh, a student at Bangor University in conjunction with Fre-energy Ltd, a company based outside Wrexham, north Wales.

Publication date: 7 June 2013

Urgency scientific expedition to assess climate induced death of coral reefs

A team of scientists led by a Bangor University professor have recently returned from a scientific expedition to the remote and largely uninhabited Chagos Archipelago in the British Indian Ocean Territory (BIOT).

Publication date: 12 May 2017

US Award for Expert in Ageing

An internationally recognised expert on ageing and dementia, Professor Bob Woods of Bangor University, is to be the first international recipient of an American Award on Thursday 13 October 2011.

Publication date: 12 October 2011

Using Welsh within the community

As part of an evaluation of the Welsh Government’s Welsh Language Strategy, Dr Rhian Hodges and Dr Cynog Prys, of Bangor University’s School of Social Sciences conducted a research study into the opportunities to use Welsh in six communities in Wales. The Welsh Language was found to be in a fragile state within the communities studied: Cardigan, Aberystwyth, Bangor, Llanrwst, Porthmadog and Ammanford. Despite this, evidence of the use of Welsh was found in the communities, along with a desire to have more varied opportunities to use Welsh within daily life (i.e while shopping or receiving Public Services).

Publication date: 9 October 2015

US visit to research Kubrik- possibly the greatest post-war American Film Director

Dr Nathan Abrams, a Senior Lecturer in Film Studies at Bangor University’s School of Creative Studies & Media, has won a prestigious highly-competitive, and internationally-recognised Dorot Foundation Fellowship at the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center at the University of Texas, Austin.

Publication date: 19 June 2013

Venom development revealed by first genome sequencing of King Cobra

Scientists studying snake venom have for the first time sequenced the entire genome of a venomous snake, the King Cobra, and confirmed a previously proposed but poorly documented hypothesis explaining how snake venom is produced and what led to the great complexity of venoms consisting of dozens of individual toxins.

Publication date: 4 December 2013

Violence prevention ‘Toolbox for teachers’ to reduce aggression among children and violence against children in Jamaican preschools

A  suite of strategies for teachers, aimed at preventing the early development of antisocial behaviour and increasing young children’s social-emotional competence, is to be rolled out and further tested in a four-year study in Jamaica’s capital, Kingston.

Publication date: 13 October 2014

Virtual Learning iPad app to help train future neurosurgeons

A new mobile ‘app’, downloadable free of charge, will assist with the training of future neurosurgeons, and is just one of a stream of programmes being developed, adapting visual computing and three dimensional realities to provide cost-effective virtual learning for a range of medical procedures.

Publication date: 8 January 2013

Wales joins the Finns in beating the bullies

An anti-bullying programme being rolled out to schools by Bangor University, the only Centre in the UK licensed to introduce the programme, is helping schools to reduce and deal with bullying.

Developed and evaluated in Finland, with extensive funding from the Finnish government, the KiVa anti-bullying programme is proven to reduce bullying in schools there - and early indications suggest its effectiveness in Welsh schools as well.

Publication date: 2 February 2016

Wales Labour Market Summit 2016 (WLMSII)

Dylan Williams, head of Regulatory and Economic Development at Isle of Anglesey County Council, was one of the speakers at the second Wales Labour Market Summit (WLMSII) - a free knowledge exchange event which took place at Bangor University recently. 

Mr Williams profiled the major transformational projects on the horizon for North Wales and Anglesey, and offered insights into how North Wales can take advantage of the supply chain opportunities offered by such developments.

Publication date: 21 September 2016

Wales punches above its weight in terms of research outputs, efficiency and impact

Wales’s use of research inputs is highly productive and efficient, outranking most comparator countries of a similar size, according to an independent report launched today (6.2.14).

Commissioned by the Welsh Government, Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and Welsh universities, the ‘International Comparative Performance of the Welsh Research Base 2013’, carried out by Elsevier, examined the research base of universities, research institutes, industry and the NHS in Wales and compared their publication rates and impacts with competitor countries in order to demonstrate the benefits and return of public investment in university research.

Publication date: 7 February 2014

Want to develop 'grit'? Take up surfing

My friend, Joe Weghofer, is a keen surfer, so when he was told he’d never walk again, following a 20ft spine-shattering fall, it was just about the worst news he could have received. Yet, a month later, Joe managed to stand. A further month, and he was walking. Several years on, he is back in the water, a board beneath his feet. Joe has what people in the field of positive psychology call “grit”, and I believe surfing helped him develop this trait.

This article by Rhi Willmot, PhD Researcher in Behavioural and Positive Psychology, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 20 July 2017

Want to stay mentally healthy in older age? Stimulate your brain in early life

Stimulating the brain by taking on leadership roles at work or staying on in education help people stay mentally healthy in later life, according to new research.

The large-scale investigation published in the journal PLOS Medicine and led by Prof Linda Clare of the University of Exeter, recently of Bangor University’s School of Psychology used data from more than 2,000 mentally fit people over the age of 65, and examined the theory that experiences in early or mid life which challenge the brain make people more resilient to changes resulting from age or illness – they have higher “cognitive reserve”.

Publication date: 24 April 2017

Waste-biogas is at least ten times more effective than crop-biogas at reducing greenhouse gas emissions

In a paper just released in the leading bioenergy journal Global Change Biology Bioenergy, researchers from Bangor University and the Thünen Institute in Germany conclude that crop-biogas and liquid biofuels are at best inefficient options for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation, per hectare of land used and per £ public subsidy required. At worst these options could actually lead to higher global GHG emissions owing to indirect land use change caused by displacement of food production. In comparison, waste-biogas and Miscanthus (woody grass) heating pellets achieve at least ten times more GHG mitigation per tonne of dry matter biomass and per hectare of land used, respectively, leading to cost-effective GHG mitigation.

Publication date: 26 February 2015

Welsh children’s report to United Nations is a first

School pupils from three primary schools across north Wales (Beaumaris Primary School, Southdown Primary School, Buckley and Hiraddug Primary, Dyserth)  were invited by Bangor University’s Law School to formally launch their report "Lleisiau Bach Yn Galw Allan / Little Voices Shouting Out" (17th November). This is the first time the United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child has received a report drawn up by 7-11, based on their own research.

Publication date: 17 November 2015

Welsh Food Banks on the increase

Wales now has 157 foodbanks which support people at risk of not being able to feed themselves and their families (data collected July 2015) compared to 16 in 1998.

These new statistics come from a research project by Bangor University Social Sciences PhD student David Beck.

Publication date: 14 March 2016

Welsh play a part in dementia research

Dementia numbers in the UK have been in decline over the past 20 years according to results from a large research study which reported earlier this year. Figures in the report from the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study suggested that the figures for England, if applied to the whole UK, imply  that there are 214,000 fewer cases of dementia than predicted. That would also mean that there are currently around 670,000 people living in the UK with dementia, rather than the estimated number of 800,000 - 900,000.

To help understand the situation in Wales, Bangor University is leading the Welsh version of this research. The researchers intend to announce specific statistics for dementia rates for Wales next summer. 

Publication date: 5 November 2013

Welsh politicians learn about vital cancer research work at Bangor

The cutting edge research work on cancer being carried out in the School of Medical Sciences was highlighted to senior Plaid Cymru politicians during a recent visit to the North West Cancer Research Institute.

Publication date: 22 January 2016

Welsh schools teach pupils to be bilingual, not restrict their education

Being a Welsh-English bilingual isn’t easy. For one thing, you hear that encouraging others to learn your language is detrimental both to their education and wellbeing. For another, to speak a minority language such as Welsh you need to constantly make the effort to be exposed to it and maintain your bilingualism.

This article by Peredur Webb-Davies, Senior Lecturer in Welsh LinguisticsBangor University  was originally published on The Conversation.


Publication date: 23 June 2017

Welsh universities announce new national supercomputing research facility

A new £15m supercomputing programme of investment has been announced by universities across Wales.

Part-funded by the European Regional Development Fund through the Welsh Government, ‘Supercomputing Wales’ will enable the country to compete globally for research and innovation that requires state-of-the-art computing facilities to simulate and solve complex scientific problems.

Publication date: 28 April 2017

We need your Welsh!

Work to capture everyday words and phrases used by Welsh speakers is about to get underway with the launch of a specially designed app.

Welsh speakers from all walks of life will be able to record their conversations to form part of the Corpws Cenedlaethol Cymraeg Cyfoes (CorCenCC) project...

Publication date: 15 February 2017

What 500-year-old clams can tell us about climate change

You probably don’t think clams are the most exciting animals on the planet. But anyone who dismisses these marine bivalve molluscs surely cannot be aware of just how important they actually are. Without knowing it, they have taught us so much about the world we live in – and how it used to be.

Publication date: 7 December 2016

What causes mass whale strandings?

This article by Peter Evans, Honorary Senior Lecturer, School of Ocean Sciences was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Around 600 pilot whales recently became stranded on a New Zealand beach, around 400 of which died before volunteers could refloat them back into the sea. Sadly, this kind of mass whale stranding has occurred since human records began, and happens somewhere in the world on a regular basis.

Publication date: 15 February 2017

What happened to ‘Food Miles?

Some years ago we were being advised to buy UK-grown fresh produce to avoid the ‘food miles’ associated with importing air-freighted fruit and vegetables due to concerns over how this was contributing to the release of CO2 emissions. But it seems that that these concerns were far too simplistic. A true assessment of the ‘footprint’ of foodstuffs requires an audit of every aspect of the associated activities, from sowing the seed to consuming the produce.

Publication date: 31 October 2014

What language tells us about changing attitudes to extremism

The words “extreme”,“extremist” and “extremism” carry so many connotations these days – far more than a basic dictionary definition could ever cover. Most would agree that Islamic State, the London Bridge and Manchester Arena attackers, as well as certain “hate preachers” are extremists. But what about Darren Osbourne who attacked the Finsbury Park Mosque? Or Thomas Mairwho murdered Labour MP Jo Cox? Or even certain media outlets and public figures who thrive on stirring up hatred between people? Their acts are hateful and ideologically-driven, but calls for them to be described in the same terms as Islamic extremists are more open to debate.

This article by Josie Ryan, PhD Researcher,  at the School of Linguistics & English Language, Bangor Universitywas originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 1 September 2017

What prevents us from standing for the Assembly?

Researchers in Bangor University's College of Business, Law, Education and Social Sciences have been awarded a prestigious research contract by the National Assembly for Wales’ Independent Remuneration Board to identify and research barriers that may inhibit persons from otherwise putting their names forward for election to the Assembly.

Publication date: 5 June 2014

What’s the best way to assist children with diabetes to look after themselves?

A new study co-led by Bangor University and Cardiff University with a team of experts from across the UK is seeking to establish the best way of presenting information in order to help children and young people with type 1 diabetes look after themselves.

Publication date: 14 February 2011

What Theresa May could learn from Ted Heath about how to respond to a humanitarian crisis

In the first seven months of 2016 more than 3,000 people died seeking asylum in Europe and refugees are still seeking sanctuary from war-torn countries such as Libya, Syria and Iraq.

This article by Peter Shapely, Reader and Head of History, Welsh History and Archaeology, Bangor University and Marc David Collinson, PhD researcher in History Bangor University appears in The Conversation, read the original article.

Publication date: 4 October 2016

What you see is what you get? Bangor academics to research impression management by business organisations

‘Impression management’, or how organisations control the way they are perceived by the public, will be the focus of cutting-edge research undertaken by a new centre at Bangor University.

Publication date: 14 June 2012

When heat casts a healing spell over cancer

Thomas Turner, a recent Cancer Biology graduate from Bangor University, and Dr Thomas Caspari, a researcher based in the School of Biological Sciences at Bangor University published one of the first comprehensive reviews of  using heat in cancer treatment in Open Biology, the Royal Society's fast, open access journal.

Publication date: 18 March 2014

When languages die, we lose a part of who we are

This article by Anouschka Foltz, Lecturer in Psycholinguistics, at the School of Lingusitics & English Language was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.


The 2015 Paris Climate Conference (COP21) is in full gear and climate change is again on everyone’s mind. It conjures up images of melting glaciers, rising sea levels, droughts, flooding, threatened habitats, endangered species, and displaced people. We know it threatens biodiversity, but what about linguistic diversity?

Publication date: 9 December 2015

Where did the idea of a cashless society come from?

The concept of a "cashless society" is now getting increased attention as countries such as Sweden try to move away from bills and coins whereas in the UK there has been a failed attempt by banks to do without paper cheques. In a Bangor Business School Working Paper, Bernardo Bátiz-Lazo, of the Business School, along with Thomas Haigh of the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; The Haigh Group and David Stearns, of  Seattle Pacific University document,  the ‘cashless’ idea actually originated first in the world of business and only later moved into the realm of fiction.

Publication date: 11 April 2012

Where do antibiotic resistant microbes come from?

The increasing threat from antibiotic resistant microbes is sufficient to cast the world back into the dark-ages of medicine according to Prime Minister David Cameron, speaking at the launch of an inquiry last year.

It is estimated that microbial strains that are resistant to drugs are responsible for 5,000 deaths a year in the UK and as many as 25,000 in Europe.

One academic from Bangor University is contributing to the battle against antibiotic resistance, and is researching on several ‘fronts’, including developing a quick and efficient test that would identify bacterial strains that carry antibiotic resistant genes.

Publication date: 29 January 2015

Why does the growth of food banks matter?

This article by Dave Beck, PhD Researcher at the School of Social Sciences was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

In the last 50 years, we have observed a number of subtle, yet substantial revolutions in the way we approach our choices over food. One of the earliest revolutions saw us shift from shopping little and often with local producers – and investing in the local economy – to being swayed by the “stack ‘em high, sell 'em cheap” rhetoric, sold by supermarkets and the international economy.

Publication date: 19 April 2016

Why EU rules risk making Italy's banking crisis a whole lot worse

This article by Philip Molyneux, Professor of Banking and Finance, Bangor University Business School was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article

In the wake of the Italian constitutional referendum, the country’s banking crisis is going from bad to worse. The European Central Bank (ECB)‘s decision to refuse an extension to Banca Monte dei Paschi di Siena to raise €5 billion (£4.2 billion) has left the country’s third-largest bank facing a government bailout that looks likely to inflict severe pain on many ordinary Italian savers.

As if that were not enough, Italy’s biggest bank, UniCredit, announced a restructuring plan that requires a capital raising of €13 billion in the first three months of next year. Given the torrid time Monte dei Paschi has had trying to find sufficient private backing, will UniCredit need help from the Italian taxpayer, too?

Publication date: 15 December 2016

Why scrapping the €500 note may not help counter terrorism

The president of the European Central Bank has said that the bank is considering scrapping the €500 note as the big bill is being increasingly seen as “as an instrument for illegal activities”, according to ECB president, Mario Draghi. But there is little proof that scrapping the €500 note will improve chances of clamping down on nefarious transactions.

An article by Bernardo Batiz-LazoProfessor of Business History and Bank ManagementBangor University and Marybeth Rouse, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article

Publication date: 1 March 2016

Why the International Criminal Court is right to focus on the environment

The International Criminal Court is not known for prosecuting people responsible for huge oil slicks, chopping down protected rainforests or contaminating pristine land. But these people may now one day find themselves on trial in The Hague.

Publication date: 23 September 2016

Why we taught psychology students how to run a marathon

This article by , PhD Researcher in Behavioural and Positive Psychology, Bangor University, was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Mike Fanelli, champion marathon runner and coach, tells his athletes to divide their race into thirds. “Run the first part with your head,” he says, “the middle part with your personality, and the last part with your heart.” Sage advice – particularly if you are a third year psychology student at Bangor University, preparing for one of the final milestones in your undergraduate experience: running the Liverpool Marathon.

Publication date: 14 September 2017

Wild plants threatened by collection for sale could be grown commercially providing new income streams, report finds

Wild plants threatened by collection for sale could be grown commercially providing new income streams, report finds Exotic palm leaves in your Mother’s Day bouquet may have come from forests in Belize or Guatemala, central America. Export for the flower arranging industry threatens the survival of some of these palms in the wild

Publication date: 15 March 2012

Winning a penalty shootout takes mental toughness: luckily, that can be taught

The dreaded, game-deciding penalty shootouts have begun. After 120 minutes of physically and emotionally draining play, players must line up and one by one take the goalie on from the spot. Heroes and villains are made with penalties, and anyone watching – whether or not they’re supporting one of the teams involved – would sympathise with the players involved.

Publication date: 1 July 2014

‘WINSS’ of €2.6 million for science careers in Ireland and Wales Job Sustainability Programme

A €2.6 million project to develop and sustain jobs in the sector at the interface between chemistry and life sciences has been announced. Funded under the Ireland Wales 2007-2013 INTERREG IVA programme and managed in Wales by Bangor University’s School of Chemistry. The “Wales Ireland Network for Scientific Skills” (WINSS) will assist companies that work across chemistry, life sciences and material sciences. The project will provide a range of specialist skills training to develop the expertise needed by the sector.

Publication date: 14 December 2011

WISERD Immigration Study makes the news

A Welsh Government funded study carried out by researchers at Bangor University, as part of WISERD (The Wales Institute of Social and Economic Research, Data and Methods), has provided new data on what people in Wales think about immigration and how this compares to other parts of the United Kingdom.

Publication date: 3 July 2012

Wonky veg and ugly fruit are making a comeback – here's why

Rhi WillmotPhD Researcher in Behavioural and Positive Psychology, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Do the same rules that govern human attraction also apply to our choices of fruit and vegetables? Plenty of evidence suggests we do look for similar traits in both people and produce, and our perceptions of food are clearly affected by what it looks like.

Each year we waste 1.3 billion tonnes of food worldwide, a third of the total produced. This unbelievable figure is partly made up of “ugly” fruit and vegetables – those that are perfectly edible but rejected by supermarkets due to their blemished skin or unusual shape.

Publication date: 15 February 2016

“Wood isn’t good – it’s brilliant!”

Over 50 delegates attended a seminar at Bangor University recently, which focussed on helping Welsh businesses to work with and produce innovative and energy-efficient building materials.

Publication date: 7 January 2014

World record semiconductor performance set to enable the internet of things

Flexible electronics for the internet of things are now a reality thanks to new technology created by North Wales company SmartKem Ltd, with the help of scientists at Bangor University

Scientists at the School of Electronic Engineering have been testing SmartKem’s semiconductor material truFLEX® and have demonstrated operating in electronic form at the frequencies required to make high-speed flexible electronics a reality.

Publication date: 6 May 2016

World’s largest ever fishing impact study brings hope for Cardigan Bay Scallop fishermen

Scientists from Bangor University, working together with the Welsh Fishermen’s AssociationWelsh Government and Natural Resources Wales have published their findings from the world’s largest ever fishing impact study, funded in part by the European Fishery Fund.

Publication date: 13 August 2015

Would seasonal forecasting enable us to cope with our changing weather?

We’ve experienced an exceptionally wet and windy winter, and while our weather forecasters are far better at telling us what to expect in the next two or three days, they still struggle with long range seasonal forecasting.

Work conducted since the 1970’s at Bangor University has contributed significantly to the models used by climate forecasters and others. The work has focused on understanding marine turbulence in the last two decades. The Ocean Physics group at the School of Ocean Sciences  have won over £6 million in research funding to further their work since 2007.

Publication date: 28 February 2014

Young Food Dudes Lead the Way for Healthy Nurseries

An exciting new programme to establish good eating habits in very young children received the top Health Research Award from LARIA (Local Authorities Research Intelligence Association), at an awards ceremony in Manchester University.

Publication date: 17 September 2013

Zebrafish and humans have new biomedical friend in the spotted gar

The genome of a slowly evolving fish, the spotted gar, is so much like both zebrafish and humans that it can be used as a bridge species that could open a pathway to important advancements in biomedical research focused on human diseases.

Publication date: 9 March 2016

Zimbabwe ditches its dollar in the end of an economic era

On June 15 the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe took the last step in the process of ditching its currency. Zimbabwe dollars will be decommissioned at a rate of 35 quadrillion per US dollar (that’s Z$35,000,000,000,000,000 for US$1). Any remaining Zimbabwe dollars in circulation after September 30 2015 will be officially, as opposed to practically, worthless.

An article by Bernardo Batiz-Lazo Professor of Business History and Bank Management at Bangor University originally published on The Conversation

 

Publication date: 15 June 2015