Modules for course F140 | BSC/MC
BSC Marine Chemistry

These were the modules for this course in the 2017–18 academic year.

You can also view the modules offered in the years: 2018–19; 2019–20.

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Year 3 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • OSX-3005: Coastal Water Processes (20)
    The course of 16 lectures is designed to give a systematic understanding of key aspects of chemical and physical oceanography of coastal waters. The physical component of the course develops ideas you will have come across in the second year about stratification and vertical mixing in shelf seas and oceans. You will be introduced to the idea of making forecasts about the ocean using computer software and models. You will learn how to make predictions about the coastal ocean changes with the seasons. You will learn how to extend yor predictions to suspended sediments, nutrients and primary productivity in the oceans. The chemical component of the module examines in detail the biogeochemical processes controlling the concentration and distribution of biologically important elements in the water column and underlying sediments. The module material will contribute to your understanding of the temporal and spatial variation in element concentrations related to organic matter production and destruction and how both the physics of the water column and mans' activities can impact on their distribution.
  • FXX-3101: Pollution and Environment (10)
    The course covers a range of topics on inorganic and organic pollutants with emphasis on sensing, measurements and amelioration strategies. The course is taught as a combination of course work and traditional lectures. The focus will be: identification of pollutants; measurement of their concentrations; techniques to deal with pollutants. Course Team: Dr L Murphy (16 workshops - inorganic pollutants), Dr C Gwenin (8 lectures, sensors), Prof M Baird (8 lectures, organic pollutants). RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING none RECOMMENDED READING 1. Environmental Chemistry, A global perspective by Gary W vanLoon and Stephen J Duffy (2010) 2. Environmental Chemistry, 9th Ed., S E Manahan, 2009 3. Principles of Chemical Sensors, J Janata 2nd Ed. 2009 4. Chemical Sensors, Robert W. Cattral (OUP Chemistry Primer) SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS None
  • FXX-3116: Project - Quadruple Module (40) Core
    CORE MODULE. This module is CORE to your degree programme. In order to progress to the next year of study or qualify for a degre you MUST successfully complete and pass this module. This practical module concentrates on an area of research in a sub-discipline (organic, inorganic, physical) of your choosing. You will be required to undertake chemical laboratory / computational / instrumental research for a considerable period of time each week (approx. 18 hours) and to write-up a 40 page report on your findings. Course Team: Project Supervisor, Research Committee Members (2) RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING - None RECOMMENDED READING - None SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS - None
  • FXX-3503: Research Skills (10)
    The main topics covered are:- 1. Identifying and retrieving chemical research information (from peer reviewed journals and academic databases) 2. Organising, summarising and integrating the chemical literature 3. Public understanding of science 4. Project management tasks- focusing on project planning and monitoring. 5. Understanding nature of the scientific method and ethics. 6. Have an awareness of current chemistry research (RSC lectures) 7. Participate in career/employability workshops. Course Team: Dr R Davies (3 lectures), Dr M Lahmann (3 lectures), Dr H Tai (6 lectures), Dr L Murphy (6 lectures), Dr M Beckett (3 lectures), Employability (1 lecure) non credit bearing. RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING 1. Study and Communication Skills for the Chemical Sciences Tina Overton, Stuart Johnson, and Jon Scott 2011 (OUP) RECOMMENDED READING none SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS It is expected that students will purchase or have ready access to the essential text books above
  • FXX-3510: Core Organic Chemical Concepts (10)
    Physical organic chemistry and synthesis This section details some principal physical-organic aspects. The characteristics of reactions, with emphasis on cyclization reactions, will be discussed in terms of the Frontier Orbital Theory and the Hammond principle. Organic chemistry inspired by Nature During this unit examples of natural product synthesis will be discussed and compared with the chemistry in biological systems. Some fundamental organic reactions will be revisited and related to the biological pathways. Course Team: Professor M Baird (10 lectures), Dr P Murphy (10 lectures) RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING 1. Organic Chemistry, Jonathan Clayden, Nick Greeves, Stuart Warren and Peter Wothers (2nd Ed 2012) RECOMMENDED READING 1. March's Advanced Organic Chemistry Reactions, Mechanisms and Structure, M B Smith and J. March (McGraw-Hill 2001) 2. Physical Basis of Organic Chemistry , H Maskill (OUP 1993) 3. Molecular Orbitals and Organic Chemical Reactions: by Ian Fleming. Student Edition Paperback 2009 Publisher Wiley-Blackwell SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS

Semester 2

  • FXX-3116: Project - Quadruple Module
    CORE MODULE. This module is CORE to your degree programme. In order to progress to the next year of study or qualify for a degre you MUST successfully complete and pass this module. This practical module concentrates on an area of research in a sub-discipline (organic, inorganic, physical) of your choosing. You will be required to undertake chemical laboratory / computational / instrumental research for a considerable period of time each week (approx. 18 hours) and to write-up a 40 page report on your findings. Course Team: Project Supervisor, Research Committee Members (2) RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING - None RECOMMENDED READING - None SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS - None
  • FXX-3508: Core Physical Chem Concepts (10)
    This module is comprised of two taught lecture courses containing materials on dynamic electrochemistry, crystallography, basic surface kinetics. Electrode Dynamics This part of the course aims to provide detailed analysis of the kinetics of reactions at metallic electrodes. Modern techniques for studying rates of electron transfer and mass transport will be discussed in detail. The course will terminate with examples on electrocatalysis and corrosion, to show how modern electrochemical techniques can be used to study electrode kinetics. X-ray/Neutron diffraction Revision of basic crystallography, reciprocal lattice, generators, atomic bases, calculation of structure factors from atomic scattering factors (6 lectures): Adsorption: comparison of different isotherms (e.g. Langmuir vs BET), basic surface kinetics (6 lectures). Course Team: Dr C Gwenin (12 lectures), Dr J Thomas (12 lectures). RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING 1. Physical Chemistry, Atkins (OUP)* *Most recent edition of this as it is regularly updated. 2. Electrode Dynamics (Oxford Chemistry Primers) A. C. Fisher RECOMMENDED READING 1. A first course in electrode processes: D. Pletcher 2. Electrochemical Methods: Bard and Faulkner Instrumental methods in Electrochemistry; Southampton Electrochemistry group SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS It is expected that students will purchase or have ready access to the essential text books above

Optional Modules

20 credits from:

  • OSX-3006: Particle Dynamics (20) (Semester 2)
    This course provides an introduction to the dynamics of entrainment, transport and deposition of cohesive and non-cohesive sediments in coastal waters. The topics covered include: physical mechanisms of sediment transport, and physico-chemical controls of sedimentation; measurement and estimation of sediment transport rates; geotechnical and hydraulic interpretation of sediments textures and structures; origin and nature of bed forms, ripples, dunes, bars; density currents and avalanches: low density turbidity currents versus avalanches; tidal and wave boundary layers; sedmiment transport in steady and oscillatory flows; initiation of motion; shields criterion; bed load motion; sediment entrainment and suspension; bed forms in steady and oscillatory flow; nearshore wave-current processes - wave-induced currents, longshore sediment transport; cross-shore transport and the Bailard method.
  • DXX-3018: Rivers, Coast and Oceans (20) (Semester 2)