Module OSX-1002:
Marine Biology Practical 1

Module Facts

Run by School of Ocean Sciences

20 Credits or 10 ECTS Credits

Semester 1 & 2

Organiser: Dr Luis Gimenez Noya

Overall aims and purpose

Students undertaking this module will gain experience in the identification of a wide range of marine invertebrates and vertebrates through laboratory and field-based practical work. The laboratory-based practical work will introduce the students to a range of marine organisms including macro-algae, plankton, invertebrates and vertebrates. Three field excursions will be conducted to sandy and rocky shores where students will have the opportunity to study some of the organisms in their ecological settings. A further trip to the Anglesey Sea Zoo will show students the range of organisms that live subtidally around the UK's coast.

Course content

Size, scale and biological drawing. Microscopy
Keying out invertebrates and construction of a taxonomic key Sandy shore field trip to Traeth Melynog, salt marsh and identification of intertidal soft sediment benthos Macro-algae Benthos and Fish diversity Plankton Rocky shore field trip and survey of intertidal organisms

Assessment Criteria

excellent

Knowledge based extending well beyond the taught practical course. A thorough understanding of subject-specific concepts and principles and an in depth understanding of more specialised areas.

threshold

Knowledge based on the practical course. A basic understanding of subject-specific concepts and principles.

good

Knowledge based on the practical course and some evidence of enquiry beyond that. An understanding of most areas.

Learning outcomes

  1. Become familiar with and appreciate good laboratory and field practice

  2. Utilise and become competent in the use of transmitted and dissecting microscopes

  3. Demonstrate the maintenance and completion of a detailed laboratory and field note book

  4. Demonstrate through examination that students are familiar with a range of benthic and pelagic marine invertebrates and vertebrates

  5. Understand and learn how to construct a taxonomic key and utilise the key in the identification of organisms

  6. Demonstrate they have undertaken shore based field work

  7. Write a report on two of the practical exercises and integrate the data obtained from the practical with published literature.

Assessment Methods

Type Name Description Weight
COURSEWORK Cockle practical report

Students are required to write an ~1500 word report on the two cockle practicals that they have undertaken in weeks 5 and week 9. Guidance on report writing is given through information provided during the practicals. The report is submittted through Turnitin.

15
GROUP PRESENTATION Sea Zoo presentation

Students visit the Sea Zoo to observe and draw a range of organisms on display in the aquaria. Prior to the visit students will have organised themselves into small groups and researched organisms that they are likely to encounter during the visit. Upon return to the laboratory groups give presentations to their peers on organisms they have seen and describe briefly their biology.

10
EXAM Semester 1 exam

This is an examination in which students answer short questions, write short notes and more detailed accounts about aspects of the practicals that they have undertaken during the first semester. Students maybe asked to interpret scientific data, plot data and annotate diagrams directly on the examination paper. Students can NOT use their laboratory notebook duirng the examination. A trial examination paper will be uploaded onto Blackboard two weeks before the end of the semester teaching. At least Fifty percent of the questions on this paper will appear in the examination paper.

30
COURSEWORK Aberffraw field report

Students are required to write a report on the Abberfraw practical that they have undertaken in the second semester. Guidance on report writing is given through information provided during the practical. The total length of the report should NOT exceed 2 pages (Reference list can be on a 3rd page); it must be maximum 400 words. The word count includes text in table and figure legends, but does not include your Reference list. The report is submitted through Turnitin.

15
EXAM Semester 2 exam

This is an examination in which students answer short questions, write short notes and more detailed accounts about aspects of the practicals that they have undertaken during the second semester. Students maybe asked to interpret scientific data, plot data and annotate diagrams directly on the examination paper. Students can NOT use their laboratory notebook duirng the examination. A trial examination paper will be uploaded onto Blackboard two weeks before the end of second semester teaching. At least 50% of the questions will appear in the examination paper.

30

Teaching and Learning Strategy

Hours
Practical classes and workshops

Laboratory based practicals (48 hrs)

48
Fieldwork

Field Excursions to representative shores (24 hrs)

24
Private study

Private study. Students will be required to append additional notes relating to the laboratory practical class material and will be expected to write notes relating to the field excursions and the ship based exercise in a standard laboratory note book. Standard notebooks will be offered for sale at the beginning of term and students will be expected to purchase them. These notebooks will be visually checked and date stamped after each practical to provide feedback about progress. Students will be encouraged to research material covered in their practical classes and to make further notes in their notebooks. Practical 2 Seal identification practical will require students to access data on Blackboard regulalry to follow seal movements. Three reports will be written throught the module.

128

Transferable skills

  • Literacy - Proficiency in reading and writing through a variety of media
  • Numeracy - Proficiency in using numbers at appropriate levels of accuracy
  • Computer Literacy - Proficiency in using a varied range of computer software
  • Self-Management - Able to work unsupervised in an efficient, punctual and structured manner. To examine the outcomes of tasks and events, and judge levels of quality and importance
  • Exploring - Able to investigate, research and consider alternatives
  • Information retrieval - Able to access different and multiple sources of information
  • Inter-personal - Able to question, actively listen, examine given answers and interact sensitevely with others
  • Critical analysis & Problem Solving - Able to deconstruct and analyse problems or complex situations. To find solutions to problems through analyses and exploration of all possibilities using appropriate methods, rescources and creativity.
  • Safety-Consciousness - Having an awareness of your immediate environment, and confidence in adhering to health and safety regulations
  • Presentation - Able to clearly present information and explanations to an audience. Through the written or oral mode of communication accurately and concisely.
  • Teamwork - Able to constructively cooperate with others on a common task, and/or be part of a day-to-day working team
  • Argument - Able to put forward, debate and justify an opinion or a course of action, with an individual or in a wider group setting

Subject specific skills

  • Appreciation of the complexity and diversity of life processes through the study of organisms.
  • Engage in debate and/or discussion with specialists and non-specialists using appropriate language.
  • Undertake field and/or laboratory studies of living systems.
  • Undertake practical work to ensure competence in basic experimental skills.
  • Demonstrate awareness of the importance of risk assessment and relevant legislation
  • Demonstrate awareness of the importance of risk assessment and relevant legislation

Resources

Resource implications for students

Students are advised to buy a standard textbook from the list above. In addition there are many copies of Hayward & Ryland held in the practical laboratory that can be consulted during the practical classes.

Reading list

Suggested reading

Any standard invertebrate textbook such as:

1) Hayward , P.J. & Ryland, J.S.Handbook of the Marine Fauna of North-West Europe. 2 nd Oxford University Press (£39.95 paperback). Strongly recommended

2) Invertebrate Zoology (Rupert & Barnes, R.D.). Older versions were by Barnes only.

3) Pechinik,J.A. Biology of the invertebrates. Wm. C. Brown Publishers.

4) Levinton,J.S. Marine Biology, function, biodiversity, ecology. 2 nd edition,Oxford University Press

Courses including this module

Compulsory in courses: