Latest News

Yoga in the workplace can reduce back pain and sickness absence

Back pain is the single leading cause of disability in the world. In the US, four out of every five people experience back pain at some point in their life. In the UK, back pain is one of the most common reasons for visits to the doctor, and missed work. In fact, absence from work due to back problems costs British employers more than £3 billion every year.

But there is a potentially easy way to prevent this problem: yoga. Our new research has found that exercises from the ancient Indian practice can have very positive benefits for back problems. Our findings suggest that yoga programmes consisting of stretching, breathing, and relaxation methods can reduce sickness absence due to back pain and musculoskeletal conditions.

Publication date: 8 December 2017

Lessons from the Beeching cuts in reviving Britain's railways

More than 50 years ago the Beeching Report was published, spelling the end of hundreds of miles of British railway lines and stations. Pretty much immediately, local campaigns sprang up to protest what became infamously known as the “Beeching Axe”. Now, the transport secretary Chris Grayling has announced that some of the lines could be re-opened.

This article by Andrew Edwards, Dean of Arts and Humanities and Senior Lecturer in Modern History, at the School of History & Archaeology was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 7 December 2017

Another successful Student Christmas Market

The B-Enterprising team at Bangor University hosted the 7th successive Student Christmas Market in PJ Hall before Christmas.

Publication date: 7 December 2017

Research partnership projects under the spotlight

Some exciting projects involving Bangor University academics working in partnership with communities, charities, government bodies, and businesses – both local and international – are being highlighted at Bangor University this Friday (8 December).

In all, seventeen of 52 projects funded through an ESRC (Economic and Social Research Council) Impact Acceleration Account at Bangor University are featured at the event.

Publication date: 7 December 2017

Tears and laughter as young and old share experiences

Over recent months, in care centres across Wales, an innovative social experiment has been taking place - and the results are astonishing.

In a new series of three emotional programmes on S4C, starting Sunday, 10 December, Hen Blant Bach shows what can happen when six children share their day care with a group of pensioners - and the potential transformational effects it can have.

Publication date: 7 December 2017

British Science Association | newsletter

Publication date: 29 November 2017

Nominations for the Drapers Medal 2017/18

Publication date: 28 November 2017

The future of agriculture in Wales: the way forward

Dr Prysor Williams, Senior Lecturer in Environmental Management at the University’s School of Environment Natural Resources and Geography is one of the authors of a report on the vision for Welsh agriculture, launched by Welsh Government today (27 November 2017).

Amaeth Cymru the future of agriculture in Wales: the way forward, has been authored by Amaeth Cymru, a group whose membership covers a spectrum of interests, including farming unions, levy bodies, government, academics and industry experts.

Publication date: 27 November 2017

Exploring the economics of sight-saving technology

Over two million people in the UK are living with sight loss. This will double to nearly four million people by 2050 as the population ages and underlying causes like obesity and diabetes increase. This places huge pressure on NHS eye care services. 

The 2016 Royal National Institute for the Blind (RNIB) report highlighted that sight loss is estimated to cost over £28 billion to the UK economy.

Research into new sight-saving technology could improve the lives of people at risk of sight loss and provide saving to the NHS and wider economy.

Two researchers from Centre for Health Economics and Medicines Evaluation CHEME,  are co-investigators on the optical coherence tomography (OCT) study, which has been awarded £1.3 million of funding from the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Invention for Innovation (i4i) Programme. 

Publication date: 23 November 2017

Publishing workshop with Cambridge University Press, Monday 27th November, 2–3pm

Publication date: 22 November 2017

Different types of alcohol elicit different emotional responses

Different types of alcohol elicit different emotional responses,  but spirits are most frequently associated with feelings of aggression, suggests research published in the online journal BMJ Open.

Publication date: 22 November 2017

Step taken on the road towards a more effective TB vaccine

Tuberculosis kills more people than any other infection and is becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics. The results of a collaboration between researchers from Bangor University led by Professor Mark Baird and Dr Juma’a Al Dulayymi, and Southampton University, led by Dr Salah Mansour, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA could drive new advances in vaccine development for tuberculosis through the intelligent design of novel lipid based therapies.

Publication date: 21 November 2017

Bangor University opens the first nuclear research institute in Wales

The first nuclear research institute in Wales has opened at Bangor University.  The Nuclear Futures Institute has been established with funding from the Welsh Government’s Sêr Cymru programme, which is helping to attract world leading researchers to Wales, with funding also coming from the European Regional Development Fund and from the University.

Publication date: 16 November 2017

Exercise training alone does not lead to weight loss in females in the medium term

New research from Bangor University has shown that exercise training alone does not lead to weight loss in women.

Publication date: 15 November 2017

Blue Planet II: can we really halt the coral reef catastrophe?

The third episode of the BBC’s Blue Planet II spectacularly described a series of fascinating interactions between species on some of the most pristine reefs in the world. These reefs, analogous to bustling cities, are powered by sunlight, and provide space and services for a wealth of marine life.

This article by John Turner, Professor & Dean of Postgraduate Research, School of Ocean Sciences was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 15 November 2017

Impact Workshop: Engaging with Policy & Decision-makers

Publication date: 15 November 2017

World War One U-boat partnership project gets green light from Heritage Lottery Fund for Wales’ Year of the Sea, 2018

The Heritage Lottery Fund has announced a grant of £409,700 for the Royal Commission’s partnership project: Commemorating the Forgotten U-boat War around the Welsh Coast, 1914-18.  Thanks to money raised by National Lottery players, over the next two years the project will use the latest imaging techniques to reveal underwater wrecks from the Great War, and will support coastal communities around Wales to tell their previously untold stories about the Great War at Sea.

Publication date: 15 November 2017

Lecturer Alys Conran’s debut novel named Wales' Book of the Year 2017

Creative Writer and Lecturer Alys Conran is the stand- out winner at this year’s Wales Book of the Year/ Llyfr y Flwyddyn, winning a hat-trick of Awards, scooping not only the one of the main prizes, the English Book of the year Award, a specially commissioned trophy designed and created by the artist Angharad Pearce Jones, and a £4000 prize, but also winning the Rhys Davies Trust Fiction Award English fiction Award and the People’s Choice Award, all for her debut novel Pigeon.

Publication date: 14 November 2017

Ernst & Young consultants conduct ‘Autonomous Everything’ workshop with BBS students

Bangor University alumnus Peter Bellamy, who now works for leading worldwide consultants Ernst & Young in New York, recently returned to Bangor Business School to deliver a workshop to business students on ‘Autonomous Everything’.

Publication date: 14 November 2017

Research Visions: A photography competition for Staff and Postgraduate Researchers

Publication date: 13 November 2017

Why we taught psychology students how to run a marathon

This article by , PhD Researcher in Behavioural and Positive Psychology, Bangor University, was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Mike Fanelli, champion marathon runner and coach, tells his athletes to divide their race into thirds. “Run the first part with your head,” he says, “the middle part with your personality, and the last part with your heart.” Sage advice – particularly if you are a third year psychology student at Bangor University, preparing for one of the final milestones in your undergraduate experience: running the Liverpool Marathon.

Publication date: 14 September 2017

North West Cancer Research earmarks multi-million pounds’ worth of cancer research funding at Bangor University

A charity dedicated to funding life-saving cancer research in North Wales has announced it will contribute £1.34 million to advancing cancer research at Bangor University.

Publication date: 14 September 2017

Understanding UK Visa obligations when supervising international students- session for PhD Supervisors

Publication date: 14 November 2016