Latest News

The Visceral Mind Summer School

The Visceral Mind Summer School (in the School of Psychology, Bangor University) this September again attracted a large number of very highly qualified and motivated applicants.

Publication date: 18 September 2018

‘High-yield’ farming costs the environment less than previously thought – and could help spare habitats

New findings suggest that more intensive agriculture might be the “least bad” option for feeding the world while saving its species – provided use of such “land-efficient” systems prevents further conversion of wilderness to farmland.

Agriculture that appears to be more eco-friendly but uses more land may actually have greater environmental costs per unit of food than “high-yield” farming that uses less land, a new study has found.

There is mounting evidence that the best way to meet rising food demand while conserving biodiversity is to wring as much food as sustainably possible from the land we do farm, so that more natural habitats can be “spared from the plough”.   

Publication date: 14 September 2018

Insulin pumps are no better – but are more expensive – than injection devices for children in the first year after diagnosis with Type 1 Diabetes

Dr Colin Ridyard and Professor Dyfrig Hughes from the Centre for Health Economics and Medicines Evaluation (CHEME) led the health economic analysis of a recently published study investigating whether insulin administered using infusion pumps was more effective and cost-effective than using injections in babies, children and young people who had just been diagnosed with type I diabetes.

Publication date: 13 September 2018

Free school meal funds help pay for school trips too – but self-imposed stigma stops parents claiming

Each and every one of us define success in our way. But in schools, it is mostly limited to a grading system, with pupils who achieve better marks considered to be more of a “success”. The barriers to this success are not just natural intelligence, or lack of hard work, however, they come from a variety of different places.

For our recently published study, we looked at how poverty and educational attainment are linked in rural Wales. We spoke to children, teachers and other key stakeholders to explore the problems that they experience and perceive. We also looked at national, regional and local plans and policies for combating poverty and increasing educational attainment in pupils.

This article by Gwilym Siôn ap Gruffudd, Lecturer/ Researcher in Education, School of Education and Human Development, was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 6 September 2018

Life's purpose rests in our mind's spectacular drive to extract meaning from the world

What is the purpose of life? Whatever you may think is the answer, you might, from time to time at least, find your own definition unsatisfactory. After all, how can one say why any living creature is on Earth in just one simple phrase?

This article by Guillaume Thierry, Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience, was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 4 September 2018

British Science Association | August 2018 newsletter

Publication date: 31 August 2018

Extreme weather in Europe linked to less sea ice and warming in the Barents Sea

This article by Yueng-Djern Lenn, Senior Lecturer in Physical Oceanography, Benjamin Barton, PhD Researcher, School of Ocean Sciences and Camille Lique, Research scientist in physical oceanography, Institut Français de Recherche pour l’Exploitation de la Mer (Ifremer) was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 30 August 2018

Research methods that find serial criminals could help save tigers

A geographic profiling tool used to catch serial criminals could help reduce the casualties of human-tiger conflict, according to scientists who collaborated on an innovative conservation research study.

Publication date: 28 August 2018

NRN-LCEE Events

Publication date: 20 July 2018

Response to the Reid report on research and innovation

Following today’s publication of Professor Graeme Reid’s review of Government-funded research and innovation in Wales, Bangor University’s Pro Vice-Chancellor for Research & Impact, Professor Jo Rycroft-Malone said: “Wales has a number of strengths in research and innovation and it’s important that we continue to support existing areas of excellence, as well as develop and nurture new areas of expertise.

Publication date: 6 June 2018