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Bangor scientists strengthen Russian links to fight climate change

Scientists from North Wales have attended a ground-breaking climate change seminar in Siberia.

Two scientists from Bangor University were invited by the British Consulate in Russia to talk about their environmental research.

Publication date: 15 January 2020

Barriers to healthcare for deaf communities in Wales

Deaf people in Wales face serious challenges in getting the health care information and services that they need, according to a recently published report. (Health and Wellbeing for Deaf Communities in Wales: Scoping for a Wales-Wide Survey).

Publication date: 13 January 2020

Exercise: we calculated its true value for older people and society

Taking up exercise is one of the most popular New Year’s resolutions for people wanting to improve their health. But our research shows that the benefits of older people going to exercise groups go beyond self-improvement and provide good value for society, too.

This article by Carys Jones, Research Fellow in Health Economics at the Centre for Health Economics and Medicines Evaluation is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 9 January 2020

Five years on from the Charlie Hebdo attack, ‘Je suis Charlie’ rings hollow

After the terror attack on the Paris office of satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo on January 7 2015 left 12 people dead, many declared “Je suis Charlie” (“I am Charlie”) in solidarity. But behind the understandable emotion that accompanied such declarations lay a more complicated reality. Many reactions to the attack were more conservative than first appeared, and not in keeping with the values of the publication. Five years on, “Je suis Charlie” has quite a hollow ring to it.

This article by Jonathan ErvineSchool of Languages, Literatures & Linguistics is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article

Publication date: 6 January 2020

Did human hunting activities alone drive great auks’ extinction?

eLife news release

New insight on the extinction history of a flightless seabird that vanished from the shores of the North Atlantic during the 19th century has been published today in eLife.

The findings suggest that intense hunting by humans could have caused the rapid extinction of the great auk, showing how even species that exist in large and widespread populations can be vulnerable to exploitation

Publication date: 26 November 2019