Latest News

Tidal range power plants hold potential for electricity generation

In theory, one third of global electricity needs could be provided by the world’s tidal range, according to a new comprehensive state-of-the-art review of tidal range power plants.

Publication date: 21 May 2018

The Toddlers who took on Dementia

“The Toddlers who Took on Dementia” is a BBC Wales documentary that follows three days of planned activities which aimed to examine what happens when nursery children come together with people living with Dementia.

Publication date: 21 May 2018

Why Wales was right to say yes to the UK's Brexit Bill

Both Wales and Scotland have acknowledged the need to prepare UK laws for EU withdrawal, yet they have taken very different stances on how this can be achieved. While the Welsh Assembly has agreed to the UK government’s proposed Brexit Bill, the Scottish parliament has said no.

This article by Stephen Clear, Lecturer in Law, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 18 May 2018

Some lizards have green blood that should kill them – and scientists can't work out why

If you were to see certain New Guinea skinks lose their tails, you’d notice that their blood isn’t the usual red colour we’re used to but rather a virulent shade of green. What’s even more bizarre is that the substance that’s responsible for the green colour of the lizards’ blood (and bones, tongues, muscles and mucous membranes) would be toxic in other animals if they carried it in such large amounts.

Exactly why these skinks are filled with this toxic substance and why it doesn’t kill them is something of a mystery. But new research published in Science Advancesmakes an important step towards answering these questions.

This article by Dr Anita Malhotra, Senior Lecturer in Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, School of Biological SciencesBangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article

Publication date: 17 May 2018

Sacred sites have a biodiversity advantage that could help world conservation

Since the dawn of history, human societies have ascribed sacred status to certain places. Areas such as ancestral burial grounds, temples and churchyards have been given protection through taboo and religious belief. As many of these places have been carefully managed for many years an interesting side effect has occurred – the sites often retain more of their natural condition than surrounding areas used for farming or human habitation. As a result, they are often called “sacred natural sites” (SNS).

This article by John Healey, Professor of Forest Sciences, Bangor UniversityJohn Halley, Professor of Ecology, University of Ioannina, and Kalliopi Stara, Postdoctoral Researcher, University of Ioannina was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 17 May 2018

New insight into motivation of farmers to plant trees

The research of former Bangor University PhD student Syed Rahman features in a new high-profile blog published by the prestigious Centre for International Forestry Research (CIFOR). 

Publication date: 14 May 2018

Five brain-boosting reasons to take up martial arts – at any age

This article by Ashleigh Johnstone, PhD researcher in Cognitive Neuroscience at the School of Psychology was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

We are all aware that exercise generally has many benefits, such as improving physical fitness and strength. But what do we know about the effects of specific types of exercise? Researchers have already shown that jogging can increase life expectancy, for example, while yoga makes us happy. However, there is one activity that goes beyond enhancing physical and mental health – martial arts can boost your brain’s cognition too.

Publication date: 8 May 2018

2001 comes to Bangor

The Centre for Film, Television and Screen Studies at Bangor University will be celebrating the 50th anniversary of the legendary movie, 2001: A Space Odyssey in Pontio on Saturday 16th June 2018.

Publication date: 3 May 2018

Reefs that experience high frequency temperature variability most likely to resist coral bleaching

As scientists and conservationists race to work out the best way to conserve the world’s coral reefs, a new study reveals why some reefs appear to be more resistant to coral bleaching during ocean warming events and calls for higher-resolution data to be collected.

Publication date: 30 April 2018

Research helps net £90 million for schools

Research from Bangor University showing the effectiveness of extra funding to schools has enabled the Welsh Government to increase funding levels to schools in order to tackle poverty in Wales.

The collaborative research commissioned by GWE and ERW, two school improvement services providers, provided Welsh Government with evidence on which to base its decision to increase funding to schools under the Pupil Development Grant funding by a further 90 million in 2018-19.  Educationalistspsychologistssocial scientists, and legal experts who have amassed vast experiences of working with schools, pupils and children, worked together to conduct a comprehensive review of how poverty could be affecting educational achievement in Wales.

Publication date: 30 April 2018

A practical solution to challenges faced by bilingual children

Children learning two or more languages are both over and under diagnosed for language impairment.

Publication date: 26 April 2018

Bangor cognitive neuroscientist to spend the summer in Utah learning about molecular genetics

Prof Debbie Mills, was recently awarded a Leverhulme International Academic Fellowship " Linking gene expression with social brain activity.” 

Publication date: 26 April 2018

Working to safeguard the public against viruses and antibiotic resistant bacteria

Scientists working to reduce risk the risks to the public from exposure to viruses and antibiotic resistant bacteria in the water environment are meeting to share their research and discuss next steps today (14 March at the Royal Geographic Society, London).

Publication date: 14 March 2018