Latest News

Are the Amazon fires a crime against humanity?

Fires in the Brazilian Amazon have jumped 84% during President Jair Bolsonaro’s first year in office and in July 2019 alone, an area of rainforest the size of Manhattan was lost every day. The Amazon fires may seem beyond human control, but they’re not beyond human culpability.

This article by Tara Smith, Lecturer in Law, is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 17 September 2019

Do nature shows deceive us into thinking our planet is fine?

Research into recent BBC and Netflix nature documentaries suggests that while they increasingly mention threats faced by the natural world, they rarely show the full extent of human-caused environmental destruction

There is overwhelming scientific consensus that nature is being severely affected by humans, the rate of species extinctions is accelerating, and that this has serious impacts. Nature documentaries have sometimes been criticised for failing to show the true extent of this environmental loss. A new study found that while recent high-profile nature documentaries talk more about the threats facing the inspiring natural wonders portrayed, nature is still mostly visually depicted as pristine and untouched, potentially resulting in a sense of complacency among viewers.

Publication date: 17 September 2019

A green revolution needn’t be dull with sustainable sequins!

With sequins remaining ‘on-trend’ in the world of ‘fast fashion’, one small company is hoping to add a little light of brilliance and sustainability by developing a biodegradable sequin.

Fast fashion is often criticised for increasing the amount of material sent to landfill. The craze for sequins only serves to add a literal ‘layer’ of unrecyclable plastic into that mix.

One company is hoping to change all that however. Rachel Clowes established The Sustainable Sequin Company a year ago to provide the fashion industry with a sustainable sequin.

Rachel is currently using recycled plastic to provide off the shelf and custom-made sequins of various shapes and sizes. Rachel’s recycled plastic sequins are the first step towards her goal of developing a compostable sequin, which when used on a biodegradable material, could see the whole garment degrading naturally once sent to landfill.

Rachel has turned to experts at Bangor University and has asked them to throw their considerable experience behind her challenge.

Publication date: 10 September 2019

Preventable trauma in childhood costs North America and Europe $1.3 trillion a year

Across Europe and North America the long-term impact of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) on health and productivity is equivalent to 1.3 trillion dollars a year, according to a new paper published in the Lancet Public Health.

The cost is equivalent to a massive three per cent of the two regions’ combined Gross Domestic Product - or 1,000 dollars a year for every person in North America and Europe.

Publication date: 4 September 2019

How machine learning is improving English cricketers

Innovative machine learning may seem light years away from first class test cricket, but it was the introduction of machine learning which enabled experts at Bangor University to reveal to the England & Wales Cricket Board (ECB) the factors which can lead to developing county or international world-class cricketers.

Publication date: 2 September 2019

How do we prepare cricketers for the pressure of performance on the pitch?

In July 2019 the England Men’s cricket team won the World Cup, and on Sunday 25th August 2019 Ben Stokes steered the team to a record run-chase to delivery victory against Australia in the 3rd Ashes Test Match.

Ground-breaking individualised training programmes are helping the England & Wales Cricket Board (ECB) to prepare their players to face the pressure of performing on the pitch, and were a key factor in the England Mens teams’ recent world cup success.

Publication date: 27 August 2019

Cilia: cell's long-overlooked antenna that can drive cancer — or stop it in its tracks

You might know that our lungs are lined with hair-like projections called motile cilia. These are tiny microtubule structures that appear on the surface of some cells or tissues. They can be found lining your nose and respiratory tract too, and along the fallopian tubes and vas deferens in the female and male reproductive tracts. They move from side to side to sweep away any micro-organisms, fluids, and dead cells in the respiratory system, and to help transport the sperm and egg in the reproductive system.

This article by Angharad Mostyn Wilkie, PhD Researcher in Oncology and Cancer Biology, at the School of Medical Sciences republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 27 August 2019

Bangor University Shines the Spotlight on Women in Music

Bangor University’s School of Music and Media is holding its Second International Conference on Women’s Work in Music this year. The Conference takes place on 4 - 6 September, and the University will be welcoming prominent speakers and musicians, including music scholars, practitioners, funders, broadcasters, journalists and music professionals from all around the world.

Publication date: 27 August 2019