News: February 2019

The power of language: we translate our thoughts into words, but words also affect the way we think

The power of language: we translate our thoughts into words, but words also affect the way we think

Have you ever worried in your student years or later in life that time may be starting to run out to achieve your goals? If so, would it be easier conveying this feeling to others if there was a word meaning just that? In German, there is. That feeling of panic associated with one’s opportunities appearing to run out is called Torschlusspanik.

This article by Guillaume Thierry, Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at the School of Psychology is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 26 February 2019

Bangor compositions feature on BBC Radio 3's Hear and Now

Listeners to BBC Radio 3’s Hear and Now program are set to to enjoy a repertoire of music by Bangor University School of Music & Media staff and student composers at 10.00pm this coming Saturday, 23 February. The broadcast will feature Étude aux objets by Prof. Andrew Lewis, Ultrasonic by Dr Guto Pryderi Puw and acousmatic pieces by Huw McGregor and Alex Bailey.

Follow the link below for more information and to hear the live broadcast or listen again!

Publication date: 22 February 2019

Why Paris is the perfect city to introduce break dancing to the Olympics

Along with surfing, climbing and skateboarding, break dancing has been proposed for inclusion at the Paris 2024 Olympic Games. While fans of the sports have been delighted by the news, it has provoked some criticism too, not least from followers of sports such as squash and karate which will not be considered for the 2024 games.

This article by Jonathan Ervine, Senior Lecturer in French and Francophone Studies, at the School of Languages, Literatures & Linguistics is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 22 February 2019

Even Coral Reefs are affected by socio-economics

Marine biologists working to save the world’s coral reefs say that they are increasingly being affected by human activities. As a result, the marine biologists now need to include an assessment of the effects of activities, perhaps in distant markets or cities, on the survival of coral reefs.

Writing in a special issue of Functional Ecology, “Coral reef functional ecology in the Anthropocene”, and using coral reefs as an example, the scientists call for the inclusion of socio-economic activity into account when predicting future ecosystem responses of coral reefs.

Publication date: 21 February 2019

From childcare to caring for our environment, three new Research Fellowships to feed into Assembly business

Bangor University is contributing three out of seven new research fellows, who are joining the National Assembly as part of a programme of shared knowledge between higher education institutions and the Welsh parliament.

The academics from the Schools of Law and Health Sciences and Natural Sciences will be sharing their expertise on vital issues that will feed directly into the work of the Assembly and its committees. This follows on from Bangor University’s participation in the successful pilot scheme

Publication date: 12 February 2019

UK Human Rights Act is at risk of repeal – here's why it should be protected

There have long been attempts to “scrap” the Human Rights Act 1998, which incorporates the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) into UK law. But while none have gained traction to date, parliamentarians have recently raised concerns that the government could be wavering in its commitment to the act post-Brexit.

This article by Stephen Clear, Lecturer in Constitutional and Administrative Law, and Public Procurement, at the Law School is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 12 February 2019

Why the pine marten is not every red squirrel's best friend

Pine martens are returning to areas of the UK after an absence of nearly a century. Following releases in mid-Wales during 2015, reintroductions are proposed in north Wales and southern England for 2019

This article by Craig Shuttleworth, Honorary Visiting Research Fellow, Bangor University and Matt Hayward, Associate professor, University of Newcastle is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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Publication date: 12 February 2019

New research on meaningful short breaks for carers

Shared Care Scotland have recently commissioned the School of Health Sciences at Bangor University to complete a Scoping Review to better understand the research evidence into short breaks for carers (sometimes called respite care) and what this research tells us about the impact of short breaks for carers.

Publication date: 11 February 2019

First identification of brain’s preparation for action

Neuroscientists at Bangor University and University College London (UCL) have for the first time, identified the processes which occur in our brains milliseconds before we undertake a series of movements, crucial for speech, handwriting, sports or playing a musical instrument. They have done so by measuring tiny magnetic fields outside the participants’ head and identifying unique patterns making up each sequence before it is executed. They identified differences between neural patterns which lead to a more skilled as opposed to a more error-prone execution.

Publication date: 7 February 2019

Royal reception for Ephraim and his research

Meghan, Duchess of Sussex showed particular interest in the work of Bangor University Masters student Dr Ephraim Kisangala, a Commonwealth Scholarship student from Uganda, who she met at a London reception recently.

Ephraim, a GP in Uganda who is studying Public Health and Health Promotion at Bangor University’s School of Healthcare Sciences, was invited to meet the Duchess of Sussex at an Association of  Commonwealth Universities event to announce the Duchess becoming  the Association’s Royal Patron.

Publication date: 1 February 2019