Latest News

Some lizards have green blood that should kill them – and scientists can't work out why

If you were to see certain New Guinea skinks lose their tails, you’d notice that their blood isn’t the usual red colour we’re used to but rather a virulent shade of green. What’s even more bizarre is that the substance that’s responsible for the green colour of the lizards’ blood (and bones, tongues, muscles and mucous membranes) would be toxic in other animals if they carried it in such large amounts.

Exactly why these skinks are filled with this toxic substance and why it doesn’t kill them is something of a mystery. But new research published in Science Advancesmakes an important step towards answering these questions.

This article by Dr Anita Malhotra, Senior Lecturer in Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, School of Biological SciencesBangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article

Publication date: 17 May 2018

Sacred sites have a biodiversity advantage that could help world conservation

Since the dawn of history, human societies have ascribed sacred status to certain places. Areas such as ancestral burial grounds, temples and churchyards have been given protection through taboo and religious belief. As many of these places have been carefully managed for many years an interesting side effect has occurred – the sites often retain more of their natural condition than surrounding areas used for farming or human habitation. As a result, they are often called “sacred natural sites” (SNS).

This article by John Healey, Professor of Forest Sciences, Bangor UniversityJohn Halley, Professor of Ecology, University of Ioannina, and Kalliopi Stara, Postdoctoral Researcher, University of Ioannina was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 17 May 2018

New insight into motivation of farmers to plant trees

The research of former Bangor University PhD student Syed Rahman features in a new high-profile blog published by the prestigious Centre for International Forestry Research (CIFOR). 

Publication date: 14 May 2018

Dr Cledwyn Hughes

The School was very saddened to learn of the death of Dr Cledwyn Hughes on the 29th April 2018. A native of Anglesey, ‘Cled’ as he was known by to staff and students, read for a BSc (Hons) Geography and Geology degree at University College Wales, Aberystwyth. 

Publication date: 2 May 2018

How can we communicate all that nature does for us?

As a conservation professor I believe people need to understand why protecting nature matters to them personally. Appealing to human self-interest has generated support for conservation in Switzerland, for example, where the government protects forests partly because they help prevent landslides and avalanches, or among communities in Botswanawhich conserve wildlife partly because of the value of trophy hunting. But this understanding risks being obscured by unhelpful arguments over terminology.

Publication date: 27 April 2018

Bangor weightlifters bring home the gold

Bangor University students secured podium positions at the British University and College Weightlifting Championships which took place at St Mary’s University, Twickenham recently.

Publication date: 25 April 2018

Bangor appears in UK Top 10 League Tables

Bangor University is among the top 10 universities in the UK for six subjects taught at the university according to the Complete University Guide for 2019.

The University appears third in the Wales University table, coming equal 62nd overall in the first free-to access complete ranking of all the UKs universities.

Publication date: 25 April 2018

Working to safeguard the public against viruses and antibiotic resistant bacteria

Scientists working to reduce risk the risks to the public from exposure to viruses and antibiotic resistant bacteria in the water environment are meeting to share their research and discuss next steps today (14 March at the Royal Geographic Society, London).

Publication date: 14 March 2018

Distinguished Bangor Alumnus leaves generous legacy to Agricultural Botany

John Trevor Williams (PhD Agricultural Botany, 1962) made an enormous contribution towards conserving the genes of the world’s food crops and has now ensured his legacy goes even further by leaving a £75,000 bequest to support Agricultural Botany at Bangor University.

Publication date: 8 March 2018