Latest News

Research partnership projects under the spotlight

Some exciting projects involving Bangor University academics working in partnership with communities, charities, government bodies, and businesses – both local and international – are being highlighted at Bangor University this Friday (8 December).

In all, seventeen of 52 projects funded through an ESRC (Economic and Social Research Council) Impact Acceleration Account at Bangor University are featured at the event.

Publication date: 7 December 2017

Exercise training alone does not lead to weight loss in females in the medium term

New research from Bangor University has shown that exercise training alone does not lead to weight loss in women.

Publication date: 15 November 2017

What causes marathon-runners and other extreme sport enthusiasts to catch colds?

Participants in this year’s Snowdon Marathon (28 October), described as one of Europe’s toughest, have been invited to help with research at Bangor University’s School of Sport Health & Exercise Sciences.

Exercise physiologists at the School want to identify why some runners appear to be more susceptible to falling ill or feeling poorly after running a marathon or taking part in other endurance activities, while others remain well.

Publication date: 28 October 2017

Can psychology help football academy players to maximise their potential?

Sports psychologists from Bangor University have teamed up with Manchester City Football Club to identify and understand the psychological characteristics that help young academy players to fulfil their potential.

Over the next four years, Manchester City’s academy players will be tracked as part of this unique research project. City’s coaches have already identified the psychological characteristics that they believe are key to talent development, and these will be monitored and regularly assessed. The extent to which they predict improvements in performance levels during this time will be evaluated.

Publication date: 20 October 2017

Want to develop 'grit'? Take up surfing

My friend, Joe Weghofer, is a keen surfer, so when he was told he’d never walk again, following a 20ft spine-shattering fall, it was just about the worst news he could have received. Yet, a month later, Joe managed to stand. A further month, and he was walking. Several years on, he is back in the water, a board beneath his feet. Joe has what people in the field of positive psychology call “grit”, and I believe surfing helped him develop this trait.

This article by Rhi Willmot, PhD Researcher in Behavioural and Positive Psychology, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 20 July 2017