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Can psychology help football academy players to maximise their potential?

Sports psychologists from Bangor University have teamed up with Manchester City Football Club to identify and understand the psychological characteristics that help young academy players to fulfil their potential.

Over the next four years, Manchester City’s academy players will be tracked as part of this unique research project. City’s coaches have already identified the psychological characteristics that they believe are key to talent development, and these will be monitored and regularly assessed. The extent to which they predict improvements in performance levels during this time will be evaluated.

Publication date: 20 October 2017

Want to develop 'grit'? Take up surfing

My friend, Joe Weghofer, is a keen surfer, so when he was told he’d never walk again, following a 20ft spine-shattering fall, it was just about the worst news he could have received. Yet, a month later, Joe managed to stand. A further month, and he was walking. Several years on, he is back in the water, a board beneath his feet. Joe has what people in the field of positive psychology call “grit”, and I believe surfing helped him develop this trait.

This article by Rhi Willmot, PhD Researcher in Behavioural and Positive Psychology, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 20 July 2017

Confidence can be a bad thing – here's why

Have you ever felt 100% confident in your ability to complete a task, and then failed miserably? After losing in the first round at Queen’s Club for the first time since 2012, world number one tennis player, Andy Murray, hinted that “overconfidence” might have been his downfall. Reflecting on his early exit, Murray said: “Winning a tournament is great and you feel good afterwards, but you can also sometimes think that your game is in a good place and maybe become a little bit more relaxed in that week beforehand.”

This article by Stuart Beattie, Lecturer of Psychology, Bangor University and Tim Woodman, Professor and Head of the School of Sport, Health and Exercise SciencesBangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 23 June 2017

How operational deployment affects soldiers' children

So many of us have seen delightful videos of friends and family welcoming their loved ones home from an operational tour of duty. The moment they are reunited is heartwarming, full of joy and tears – but, for military personnel who were deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan post 9/11, their time away came with unprecedented levels of stress for their whole family.

Military personnel faced longer and more numerous deployments, with short intervals in between. The impact of operational deployments on military personnel’s mental health is well reported. Far less is known, however, about how deployment affects military families, particularly those with young children.

This article by Leanne K Simpson, PhD Candidate, School of Psychology | Institute for the Psychology of Elite Performance, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 23 June 2017

SHES Post-Doc Gives Key Note address at the International Society for Skiing Safety

Dr Matt Barlow has recently delivered a key note presentation at the INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR SKIING SAFETY, 22nd ISSS Congress held between 17 – 22 April in Innsbruck, Austria. Matt’s talk was titled "Motives for participation in high risk sport."

Publication date: 28 April 2017