All News A–Z

A century after the Battle of the Somme, can we finally explain shell shock?

The Battle of the Somme was one of the most bitterly contested and bloodiest battles of World War I. The five-month attritional offensive saw more than a million casualties: on the first day of fighting alone the British Army suffered their largest loss to life of the war.

This article by Leanne K Simpson a PhD candidate at the School of Psychology & Institute of Elite Preformance was originally published on The Conversation. Read theoriginal article.

Publication date: 30 June 2016

A future where ‘smart’ contact lenses could predict your risk of suffering a common cold: Tear fluid antibodies and the common cold

Why is it that there are some people who can go a whole winter without so much as a sniffle, whilst others seem to catch every common cold that comes their way?

A new study from Bangor University’s Extremes Research Group at the School of Sport, Health & Exercise Sciences, showed that it could be possible to predict the likelihood of participants succumbing to common cold symptoms by analyzing the level of antibodies in tear fluid.

Publication date: 16 December 2015

Are you exercising enough to make you sick?

Should you go harder or go longer?

Marathon and endurance races are increasingly popular, as is a new thirst for intense exercise, such as in ‘spike’ or ‘buzz’ intensity training methods and classes. But which is better for you? Or, to put it another way, which will do least damage to your immune system?

New research by Bangor University challenges the current thinking that longer, less strenuous workouts are less harmful to the immune system.

Publication date: 4 December 2014

Arthritis Care and Research (ACR)

SHES staff have provided three out of 18 accepted articles in a special edition of the ACR on 'Muslce and bone in the Rheumatic Diseases'.

Publication date: 12 December 2011

As seen on TV

The Extremes Research Group are rapidly gaining recognition for their research into how humans face the challenge of extreme environments.

Publication date: 15 June 2011

Awards for Bangor University’s research impact

Three research projects which have made outstanding impacts in very different areas have been recognised at Bangor University’s inaugural Research and Enterprise Impact Awards.

Publication date: 12 July 2013

Bangor’s Sports Psychology expertise in demand in Malaysia

Prof. Nicky Callow from Bangor’s School of Sports Science has been invited to the University of Malaya (UM) in Kuala Lumpur as part of their prestigious visiting professorship scheme where renowned academics from around the world present workshops and seminars at the university.

Publication date: 12 February 2016

Bangor University group return from Himalayan expedition

Academics from Bangor University have recently returned from an expedition to the Himalayas as part of a research project to investigate altitude related illness.

Publication date: 4 June 2015

Bangor University Research Excellence Awards 2016

Bangor University is to highlight and celebrate the high standard of research at the University in a new Research Excellence Awards event to be held for the first time this December, and has just announced the Awards Shortlists.

The inaugural Awards will shine a spotlight on some of the University’s outstanding research teams and individuals.

The winners will be announced at an Awards dinner in Pontio on 5th December 2016.

Publication date: 26 October 2016

Bangor University subjects join elite in world table

Newly published analysis of the latest influential QS World University Rankings, which saw Bangor University soar to 411th position worldwide, now provides further information on rankings for different subject areas among the world’s best universities.

Six subjects and one subject area taught at Bangor University feature among the world’s elite universities in this year’s release of the QS World University Rankings by Subject, with Agriculture and Forestry appearing in the top 100 institutions worldwide who teach the subject and rising from among last year’s 200 top Universities.

Publication date: 8 March 2017

Blue Sky Charity Funding Awarded to Dr Aamer Sandoo

Dr Aamer Sandoo (Lecturer in Cardiovascular Physiology, SSHES)  was recently awarded £68,000 by the Blue Sky (Awyr Las) Charity to examine the effects of dietary nitrate supplements for lowering heart disease risk in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The project is in collaboration with Dr Jonathan Moore and clinicians from BCUHB. 

Publication date: 10 October 2016

British women will soon be able to serve on the military frontline – but are they ready to fight?

At last, a ban that has long restricted women’s roles within the British military is to be lifted. For years, sceptics and fearmongers have influenced policy and public opinion in the UK preventing women from serving in ground close combat roles, “where the primary role is to close with and kill the enemy”; stopping female soldiers from joining the Royal Marines, RAF Regiment, infantry and armoured regiments.

This article by Leanne K Simpson, PhD candidate at in the Schools of Psychology and Sport, Health & Exercise Sciences Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article

Publication date: 11 July 2016

Can psychology help football academy players to maximise their potential?

Sports psychologists from Bangor University have teamed up with Manchester City Football Club to identify and understand the psychological characteristics that help young academy players to fulfil their potential.

Over the next four years, Manchester City’s academy players will be tracked as part of this unique research project. City’s coaches have already identified the psychological characteristics that they believe are key to talent development, and these will be monitored and regularly assessed. The extent to which they predict improvements in performance levels during this time will be evaluated.

Publication date: 20 October 2017

Child migrants taken to Britain: now they need support and psychological care

This article by Leanne K Simpson, PhD Candidate, School of Psychology | Institute for the Psychology of Elite Performance, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Hundreds of unaccompanied child asylum seekers are being taken to Britain, moved from a camp in Calais, northern France, as its closure begins. There were 387 unaccompanied minors in the French refugee camp known as “the Jungle” with links to the UK and they are arriving in England in groups of 70.

Publication date: 24 October 2016

Confidence can be a bad thing – here's why

Have you ever felt 100% confident in your ability to complete a task, and then failed miserably? After losing in the first round at Queen’s Club for the first time since 2012, world number one tennis player, Andy Murray, hinted that “overconfidence” might have been his downfall. Reflecting on his early exit, Murray said: “Winning a tournament is great and you feel good afterwards, but you can also sometimes think that your game is in a good place and maybe become a little bit more relaxed in that week beforehand.”

This article by Stuart Beattie, Lecturer of Psychology, Bangor University and Tim Woodman, Professor and Head of the School of Sport, Health and Exercise SciencesBangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 23 June 2017

Cricket Talent Testing

As part of the continued work between IPEP and the ECB A number of IPEP members (Chelsey Dempsey, Leonie Webster, Caoimhe Martin) recently assisted Ben Jones (IPEP ECB-funded PhD student) with the England Development Programme' talent testing at the national cricket performance centre, Loughborough.

Publication date: 5 October 2015

Developing ‘Mental toughness’ can help footballers cope with high pressure penalty shoot outs

Penalty shoot-outs are possibly the most stressful situations that footballers have to contend with. They need to be able to focus on the task and block out noise and other distractions coming from the stands.

Publication date: 21 June 2012

Different motivations for high-risk activities revealed for the first time

For over 50 years the motive for high-risk activities has been thought of simply as “sensation seeking”. New research unequivocally challenges that simplistic view.

Publication date: 26 July 2013

Drinking sugar-sweetened soft drinks leads to fat gain

New research from Bangor University has shown that regularly drinking sugar sweetened soft drinks can increase fat gain, inhibit fat metabolism, and increases blood glucose in your body.  So if you’re thirsty and think of reaching for a sugary soft drink- don’t - it can compromise your long-term health. Reach for water instead.

Publication date: 20 July 2012

ECB enlists Bangor University scientists to help with cricket talent testing

The England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) has turned to sports scientists at Bangor University to assist them in creating a talent forecasting model to help identify future generations of world-class cricketers.

The aim of the research project between the ECB and the University’s School of Sport, Health & Exercise Sciences is to validate a model for predicting cricket talent. This will be used to help selectors and coaches assess and identify promising young players and increase their conversion rate into successful international cricketers.

Publication date: 9 March 2011

Employability: not just about getting a graduate job...

The College of Health and Behavioural Sciences Careers & Employability fair was held recently at Reichel Hall to give students advice on securing long-term employment, applying for jobs, and realising their career potential.

Publication date: 25 November 2016

ESRC DTP Collaborative PhD

Bangor University, School of Sport, Health & Exercise Sciences, supported by the ESRC Wales Doctoral Training Partnership (ESRC Wales DTP) and in collaboration with UK Sport, invites applications for a fully funded PhD studentship to commence in October 2017

Publication date: 29 November 2016

Exercise training alone does not lead to weight loss in females in the medium term

New research from Bangor University has shown that exercise training alone does not lead to weight loss in women.

Publication date: 15 November 2017

Extremes Research Group attend prestigious international conference

Dr. Jamie Macdonald and his PhD student, Dr. Naushad Junglee, have had four abstracts accepted for presentation at the American Society of Nephrology Kidney Week 2012, the world’s premier nephrology meeting.

Publication date: 12 September 2012

Extremes Research group to investigate altitude illness in Himalayan expedition

This week, academics from Bangor University will lead an expedition to the Himalayas as part of a research project to investigate altitude related illness. Researchers Dr Samuel Oliver and Dr Jamie Macdonald, PhD student Gabriella Rossetti and undergraduate Sport Science student James Pollard  - all from Bangor University’s School of Sport, Health and Exercise Sciences - will be part of the 55-strong team comprising of medical doctors, scientists and mountain rescuers, who will embark on the expedition on the 20th March, returning on the 25th April.

Publication date: 19 March 2015

Extremes Research Group to the Himalaya in 2013?

Drs. Jamie Macdonald and Sam Oliver are in discussion with leaders of the next Medic Journey Expedition to Mera Peak, Himalaya, 2013.

Publication date: 12 September 2012

First cohort of Sport and Exercise Psychology graduates - 13 July 2015

Publication date: 20 July 2015

Fully-funded ESRC DTP Studentship

Bangor University (School of Sport, Health & Exercise Sciences), Cardiff Metropolitan University (Cardiff School of Sport), and Swansea University (College of Engineering: Sport and Exercise Science), supported by the ESRC Wales Doctoral Training Partnership, invite applications from exceptional candidates for PhD study with the possibility of being awarded a fully-funded ESRC DTP Studentship in the area of the social science of sport and/or exercise. 

Publication date: 29 November 2016

Help in a Blizzard

Special jackets made in Wales could help keep Welsh athletes warm when the competition hots up in Glasgow.

Publication date: 22 July 2014

High Anxiety - beating fear is the key to extreme sports appeal

Sport Psychologists within the School are now recognised world-leaders in establishing the psychological motivations for taking part in extreme sports. 

Publication date: 13 December 2011

Hot bath after exercise improves performance in the heat

New research from Bangor University shows that taking a hot bath after exercise for 6 days reduces both resting and exercising body temperature and improves running performance in the heat. Prof Walsh, whose team lead the work, said “for sports people who compete in the heat, the new mantra should be: "train-cool, bathe-hot".

Publication date: 11 December 2015

How operational deployment affects soldiers' children

So many of us have seen delightful videos of friends and family welcoming their loved ones home from an operational tour of duty. The moment they are reunited is heartwarming, full of joy and tears – but, for military personnel who were deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan post 9/11, their time away came with unprecedented levels of stress for their whole family.

Military personnel faced longer and more numerous deployments, with short intervals in between. The impact of operational deployments on military personnel’s mental health is well reported. Far less is known, however, about how deployment affects military families, particularly those with young children.

This article by Leanne K Simpson, PhD Candidate, School of Psychology | Institute for the Psychology of Elite Performance, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 23 June 2017

How should top athletes acclimatise for heat?

Top athlete preparing to compete in a hot climate have to acclimatise in order to achieve their peak performance in hot climates. They currently do this by moving to the country ten to 14 days in advance or by training in a climate chamber.

In recently published research, Prof Neil Walsh and his team at Bangor University’s School of Sport, Health & Exercise Sciences have shown that taking a hot bath after exercise in temperate conditions for six days can trigger changes in the body which mimic how the body adjusts to hot weather.

Publication date: 11 August 2016

I bet you wish this story was NOT about you: cheating in sport

What drives professional sportspeople to break the rules of their sport in the hope that they won’t get caught – and in the hope that it will bring glory to them and their team?

It’s all down to character type, according to researchers at Bangor University’s Institute for the Psychology of Elite Performance (IPEP).

Publication date: 16 October 2016

Impact of Bangor University research on London 2012 highlighted in new report

Universities Week (30 April – 7 May) report shows impact of universities’ research and sport development around the Olympic and Paralympic Games and UK sports industry.

Publication date: 12 September 2012

Innovation in Armed Forces training

A project which has transformed recruitment training in the British Army and led to changes in the delivery of training across all three UK Armed Forces, has been highlighted at Bangor University recently, by winning one of the University’s first Enterprise and Impact Awards.

Publication date: 6 November 2013

Life is out there: The benefits of outdoor activities

The most recent figures from the Welsh Government show that outdoor activity tourism in Wales is worth £481 million. Outdoor activity providers such as Surf-Lines need to continue to attract visitors and locals.

The number of people regularly involved in outdoor activities has grown in the last thirty years, and researchers have reported increases in self-esteem and other positive outcomes as benefits of taking part. In other words, taking part in outdoor activities provides significant psychological and long-lasting benefits. Surprisingly, researchers still do not understand why and how these benefits occur.

Publication date: 6 November 2014

Link between Dry Eye Disease and dehydration established

Health scientists at Bangor University have for the first time established a link between dry eye disease and dehydration.

Dry eye disease (DED) is a condition which can cause extreme discomfort and lead to eye damage.  While difficult to establish the full costs of this condition to healthcare and society in the UK, it is estimated that current prescription treatments such as eye drops cost the NHS £32 million per year (in England alone).  Because many individuals suffering from DED self-treat by buying over-the-counter medications (e.g. artificial tears) the true cost of DED is likely to be significantly higher. This new link suggests that ensuring DED sufferers are fully hydrated could alleviate DED symptoms.

Publication date: 5 October 2012

'Love Your Body' to Lose Weight

New research involving SHES senior lecturer Dr David Markland shows that improving body image can enhance the effectiveness of weight loss programmes based on diet and exercise.

Publication date: 18 July 2011

Major Festival of Behaviour Change announced

Behaviour change is widely recognised as an essential tool for public services and organisations responding to the considerable contemporary social and demographic changes we are experiencing in Wales, and beyond.

A major Festival of Behaviour Change (#BehFest16) running for two weeks between 9-20 May at Bangor University, will showcase the latest thinking in applied behaviour change science, to individuals and organizations interested in learning about, designing, and implementing some of these behaviour change techniques for the benefit of their organisations or of the public at large.

Publication date: 27 April 2016

PhD Studentship - Sympathetic activation during hypoxia

Applications are invited for a three-year, full-time PhD studentship funded by the School of Sport and Exercise (SHES), Bangor University, as part of the Institute for Research Excellence in Sport and Exercise(IRESE) research collaboration between SHES and the Cardiff School of Sport (CSS), Cardiff Metropolitan University.

Publication date: 16 June 2016

Research Presentations at ECB

At the beginning of October Ben Jones is presenting his PhD proposal at the ECB's biannual academy directors conference at Trent Bridge, Nottingham.

Publication date: 5 October 2015

Scientists assess hydration potential of different drinks

Scientists at the universities of Stirling, Loughborough and Bangor are calling for the creation of a beverage hydration index to help people understand how different drinks can keep you hydrated.

A recent research trial which tested the effects of 13 commonly consumed drinks on urine output and fluid balance, found several fluids were retained in the body for the same time, or longer, than water.

Publication date: 1 June 2016

SHES PhD Students Help Organise the Inaugural Pan-Wales Postgraduate Conference

The inaugural Pan-Wales Postgraduate Conference in Sport and Exercise Sciences, held on Friday 21st April at Swansea University's stunning Bay Campus, was a huge success. 

Publication date: 24 April 2017

SHES Post-Doc Gives Key Note address at the International Society for Skiing Safety

Dr Matt Barlow has recently delivered a key note presentation at the INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR SKIING SAFETY, 22nd ISSS Congress held between 17 – 22 April in Innsbruck, Austria. Matt’s talk was titled "Motives for participation in high risk sport."

Publication date: 28 April 2017

SHES Research Highlighted as Excellent

Research by Dr Stuart Beattie et al has been highlighted as an excellent example of a piece of research by the editor of the journal, Sport, Exercise and Performance Psychology (SEPP).

Publication date: 6 March 2017

SSHES finish in top 10 for UK Sport Science departments

The Times Good University Guide has listed SSHES as one of the best Sports Science departments in the UK. The guide encompasses a large array of important metrics when ranking departments, including student satisfaction, research quality, graduate prospects, entrance qualifications, degree results achieved, student/staff ratios, service and facilities spend and university drop-out rates.

Publication date: 23 September 2014

The men who impersonate military personnel for stolen glory

This article by Leanne Simpson, PhD Candidate, School of Psychology | Institute for the Psychology of Elite PerformanceBangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article

In 2009, a 61-year-old man joined an annual Remembrance Day parade wearing an impressive array of medals. So impressive in fact that an expert said their awarding would have made him “world famous – and some sort of Rambo character”. After he was tracked down, the man, later named as Roger Day, claimed his medals were “pukka” but his story was denounced by military personnel and the public alike

Publication date: 7 November 2016

There may be more influencing your exercise endurance than you think

Now that we’re in to February, are you struggling to stick to your New Year’s resolution exercise plan? There may be more to your success or failure than meets the eye.

Researchers at Bangor University and the University of Kent have found that being shown positive or negative images subliminally, or so fleetingly that you’re not even aware of having seen them, had an effect on when individuals reached their point of exhaustion while exercising.

Publication date: 6 February 2015

The truth about the links between military service and crime

This article by Leanne K Simpson, PhD Candidate, School of Psychology | Institute for the Psychology of Elite Performance, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

The transition back to civilian life is a challenging period for military personnel – particularly when coupled with one or more of the well-publicised problems faced by veterans, including mental health issues, skills translation and the stigma surrounding military service.

In addition, there are several myths regarding the apparently inevitable transition from military service to a life of crime. These are, at best, unhelpful.

Publication date: 27 April 2016

Think twice about who you chose as leader: narcissists are initially appealing but don’t deliver in the long term

From events such as the Rugby World Cup to party politics, coaches, captains and party leaders are in the spotlight.

Leadership is an important aspect of everyday life as well, and we all choose leaders or at least, work with leaders.  For example, we know who is “boss” in the workplace, who is “captain” at Sunday footie, and who at home is “in charge”.

Publication date: 21 October 2015

Too many sugary drinks can dull taste buds and enjoyment

New research undertaken by Dr Hans-Peter Kubis and his team, has shown for the first time that overweight and obese people have a dulled sensitivity to soft drinks but enhanced subconscious liking of sweet as a taste.

Publication date: 8 June 2011

Understanding what makes cricketers super-elite

In this research project funded by the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB), Prof Lew Hardy and Dr Gavin Lawrence, along with PhD student Ben Jones are conducting a detailed examination of the biographical development of cricketers who differ in their expertise levels; 'super-elite' and elite players. Specifically, they will be examining the extent that which practice and training histories, along with demographic factors influence the pathway to the top.

Publication date: 5 October 2015

Want to develop 'grit'? Take up surfing

My friend, Joe Weghofer, is a keen surfer, so when he was told he’d never walk again, following a 20ft spine-shattering fall, it was just about the worst news he could have received. Yet, a month later, Joe managed to stand. A further month, and he was walking. Several years on, he is back in the water, a board beneath his feet. Joe has what people in the field of positive psychology call “grit”, and I believe surfing helped him develop this trait.

This article by Rhi Willmot, PhD Researcher in Behavioural and Positive Psychology, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 20 July 2017

What causes marathon-runners and other extreme sport enthusiasts to catch colds?

Participants in this year’s Snowdon Marathon (28 October), described as one of Europe’s toughest, have been invited to help with research at Bangor University’s School of Sport Health & Exercise Sciences.

Exercise physiologists at the School want to identify why some runners appear to be more susceptible to falling ill or feeling poorly after running a marathon or taking part in other endurance activities, while others remain well.

Publication date: 28 October 2017

Winning a penalty shootout takes mental toughness: luckily, that can be taught

The dreaded, game-deciding penalty shootouts have begun. After 120 minutes of physically and emotionally draining play, players must line up and one by one take the goalie on from the spot. Heroes and villains are made with penalties, and anyone watching – whether or not they’re supporting one of the teams involved – would sympathise with the players involved.

Publication date: 1 July 2014