Ganges river dolphin research published by Bangor student

A new study (7th of May) reveals a method to improve the monitoring of the endangered Ganges river dolphin – one of only four remaining freshwater cetaceans since the Yangtze River dolphin became extinct in 2007.

TA Ganges river dolphin: image credit: Mansur/WCS BangladeshA Ganges river dolphin: image credit: Mansur/WCS Bangladeshhe research author, Nadia Richman, is a scientist at the Zoological Society of London and also a PhD student at Bangor University’s School of Environment, Natural Resources & Geography.

The ability to detect changes in population size of a species helps to inform conservationists how fast a population is declining, and whether a conservation action has been effective in stopping a decline.

The study was undertaken by scientists from the Zoological Society of London (ZSL), Bangor University, the University of Chittagong in Bangladesh, the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), the Bangladesh Cetacean Diversity Project, and the Fisheries Research Agency of Japan recently in South Asian River dolphins in the rivers of Southern Bangladesh.

Nadia commented: "I chose to come and study in the School of Environment, Natural Resources and Geography at Bangor University given its reputation as an interdisciplinary research centre. Over the last three years I have met a diverse range of researchers with a broad range of expertise which has meant that I am never short of advice when needed."

A Ganges River Dolphin: image credit: Mansur/WCS BangladeshA Ganges River Dolphin: image credit: Mansur/WCS BangladeshThese findings have been published (7th of May) in the journal PLOS ONE. http://www.plosone.org/static/information.action

Publication date: 13 May 2014