Latest News

Independent music labels are creating their own streaming services to give artists a fair deal

Music streaming services are hard to beat. With millions of users – Spotify alone had 60m by July 2017, and is forecast to add another 10m by the end of the year – paying to access a catalogue of more than 30m songs, any initial concerns seem to have fallen by the wayside.

But while consumers enjoy streaming, tension is still bubbling away for the artists whose music is being used. There is a legitimacy associated with having music listed on major digital platforms, and a general acknowledgement that without being online you are not a successful business operation or artist.

This article by Steffan Thomas, Lecturer in Film and Media, at the School of Creative Studies & Media was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 18 August 2017

Historic wrecks to assist Wales’ marine renewable energy future

Historic wrecks around Wales’ coastline, such as that of a German submarine sunk 10 miles off Bardsey Island at the tip of the Llŷn Peninsula on Christmas Day 1917, are to play a part in assisting Wales’ growing marine renewable energy sector.

Over the next two years, marine scientists from Bangor University will be surveying the coast of Wales as part of the ERDF-funded SEACAMS2 project led by the University in partnership with Swansea University. The researchers at Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences and Centre for Applied Marine Sciences are undertaking collaborative research, including marine surveys, to support the sustainable growth of the marine renewable energy sector in Wales. 

Publication date: 14 August 2017

Understanding our Oceans

Bangor University’s Schools of Ocean Sciences, Electronic Engineering and Computer Science in collaboration with company partner Tidal Lagoon Power are looking for a computer science student to help them build an autonomous vehicle that will answer questions that have bugged ecologists and fisheries scientists for years – how and where do fish swim? The new project being developed by SEACAMS, Bangor University and funded by KESS 2 aims to track small marine fish to understand where  fish swim in a way that has previously only been applied to large sharks. 

Publication date: 7 August 2017