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Latest Research News

Cash remains king in Chile but its days could be numbered

This article by Bernardo Batiz-Lazo, Bangor University and Juan Felipe Espinosa, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

For more than a year now, Chileans have endured a crisis of cash access. Despite global moves toward new forms of payment such as contactless and mobile transfers, the crisis in Chile highlights the continuing importance of ATMs in today’s payment ecosystem for many people worldwide – particularly those with lower incomes.

Publication date: 25 March 2015

‘State of nature’ important in determining the impact of climate change

Current models of how vegetation will react to climate change do not consider the state of the vegetation - whether it is mature and stable, or already responding to some disturbance event.

New research from one of the world’s longest running climate change experiments, which is funded by the European Commission (EU-FP7 INCREASE infrastructure) and led by the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, and European partners, including Bangor University was published today in Nature Communications (24th March 2015, DOI: 10.1038/ncomms7682). The research suggests that for shrublands, the time since the last disturbance of the ecosystem affects its response to future climates and should be considered when predicting ecosystem responses to climate change.

Publication date: 24 March 2015

Extremes Research group to investigate altitude illness in Himalayan expedition

This week, academics from Bangor University will lead an expedition to the Himalayas as part of a research project to investigate altitude related illness. Researchers Dr Samuel Oliver and Dr Jamie Macdonald, PhD student Gabriella Rossetti and undergraduate Sport Science student James Pollard  - all from Bangor University’s School of Sport, Health and Exercise Sciences - will be part of the 55-strong team comprising of medical doctors, scientists and mountain rescuers, who will embark on the expedition on the 20th March, returning on the 25th April.

Publication date: 19 March 2015

Study to conserve genetic resources of wild tilapia for the future of fish farming

With world fish stocks dwindling, tilapia farming is a global success story, with production tripling this millennium.

This is now a $7.6bn industry, producing 4.5million tonnes of affordable high-quality fish every year. And it is sustainable, because unlike the salmon and sea bass we grow in Europe, tilapia don’t need to be fed lots of other fish caught from the oceans, but largely eat vegetable material and farmyard waste. Although now cultured throughout the world, tilapia originally come from Africa.

Publication date: 16 March 2015

Prestigious Impact Accelerator Account to benefit economic and social research exchange

A major award to Bangor University is set to increase the way in which the University shares economic and social sciences research for the benefit of society as a whole.

Bangor University has been awarded over £670,000 by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) one of the major research awarding bodies in the UK.

Publication date: 16 March 2015

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