Latest Research News

Reaching out to reduce self-harm and suicide

While self-harm and suicide in European and American populations are well researched and the risk factors understood, much less is known about these behaviours in South Asia, where rates are very high.

Bangor University’s Centre for Mental Health and Society has been awarded a prestigious Research Council UK Global Challenges Research Fund grant to work with colleagues in India and Pakistan to address these issues. The project will be equipping local researchers with the skills they need to develop long-term programmes to reduce death, disability and distress.  The Capability Grant award is a key component in the UK Aid strategy to grow both the research base in the UK and strengthen capacity overseas. The aim is to address research challenges which respond to the expressed needs of developing countries.

Publication date: 21 July 2017

Want to develop 'grit'? Take up surfing

My friend, Joe Weghofer, is a keen surfer, so when he was told he’d never walk again, following a 20ft spine-shattering fall, it was just about the worst news he could have received. Yet, a month later, Joe managed to stand. A further month, and he was walking. Several years on, he is back in the water, a board beneath his feet. Joe has what people in the field of positive psychology call “grit”, and I believe surfing helped him develop this trait.

This article by Rhi Willmot, PhD Researcher in Behavioural and Positive Psychology, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 20 July 2017

Quantifying the environmental cost of fishing on the seabed

Trawling contributes 20% of the global landings of fish caught at sea, hence it is an essential means of providing food for millions of people.

Bottom trawling is used to catch fish and shellfish that live in or near the seabed. Despite its importance, bottom trawling causes variable amounts of physical and biological change to seabed habitats, and can induce structural and functional changes in seabed communities. Understanding the ecosystem consequences of trawling is important so that we can reduce negative impacts on the seabed through appropriate management measures.

Publication date: 18 July 2017

People with dementia benefit from goal-oriented therapy

Ninety people who are living with dementia and their carers from across north Wales, have contributed to new research findings which have shown that personalised cognitive rehabilitation therapy can help people with early stage dementia to significantly improve their ability to engage in important everyday activities and tasks.

The large-scale trial presented at the international Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC) 2017 on Tuesday July 18, found that cognitive rehabilitation leads to people seeing satisfying progress in areas that enable them to maintain their functioning and independence.

Publication date: 18 July 2017

Irish Ambassador visits Bangor University

Bangor University hosted Ireland’s Ambassador to the UK recently and showcased some of the ongoing research collaborations between Bangor and Irish partner institutions.

Publication date: 13 July 2017

Higher use of general health care services throughout adult life linked with traumatic childhoods

Experiencing physical, sexual or emotional abuse as a child, or other stresses such as living in a household affected by domestic violence, substance abuse or mental illness, can lead to higher levels of health service use throughout adulthood.

research paper in the Journal of Health Service Research & Policy provides, for the first time, the statistical evidence showing that, regardless of socio-economic class or other demographics, people who have adverse childhood experiences use more health and medical services through their lifetime.

Publication date: 12 July 2017

Ocean Mixing Experts head for Bangor

Experts in Ocean Mixing from across the planet are heading to the Marine Centre Wales at Bangor University for an International workshop on “Ocean Mixing” (11th – 13th July).

The scientists from as far afield as the US, China and Russia, as well as continental Europe and the UK, will be discussing global efforts to improve understanding of the processes which stir up the oceans and how those processes should be represented in weather and climate forecast models.  

Publication date: 11 July 2017

Artists and architects think differently to everyone else – you only have to hear them talk

How often have you thought that somebody talks just like an accountant, or a lawyer, or a teacher? In the case of artists, this goes a long way back. Artists have long been seen as unusual – 

people with a different way of perceiving reality. Famously, the French architect Le Corbusier argued in 1946 that painters, sculptors and architects are equipped with a “feeling of space” in a very fundamental sense.

This article by Thora Tenbrink, Reader in Cognitive Linguistics, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 11 July 2017

How we're using ancient DNA to solve the mystery of the missing last great auk skins

On a small island off the coast of Iceland, 173 years ago, a sequence of tragic events took place that would lead to the loss of an iconic bird: the great auk.

This article by Jessica Emma Thomas, PhD Researcher, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 10 July 2017

‘Golden thread’ should be sought to support region’s economy

One of the main thrusts of a new scoping report on the north Wales economy suggests that regional stakeholders are seeking to ensure that a 'golden thread' runs through the supply chain to enable local small firms to benefit from incoming economic opportunities.

The report also identifies that Welsh Government have the opportunity, through the potential for devolved powers on procurement rules, to ensure quality jobs and good terms and conditions for workers on inward investment projects.

Publication date: 7 July 2017

Chefs and home cooks are rolling the dice on food safety

Encouraging anyone to honestly answer an embarrassing question is no easy task – not least when it might affect their job.

For our new research project, we wanted to know whether chefs in a range of restaurants and eateries, from fast food venues and local cafes to famous city bistros and award-winning restaurants, were undertaking “unsafe” food practices.

This article  by Paul Cross, Senior Lecturer in the Environment, School of Environment, Natural Resources & Geography Bangor University and Dan Rigby, Professor, Environmental Economics, University of Manchester was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 3 July 2017

Brexit's impact on farming policy will take Britain back to the 1920s – but that's not necessarily a bad thing

Not much regarding Brexit is clear. But one thing we do know is that the UK’s decision to leave the EU has triggered proposals to implement the most significant changes to agricultural policy since it joined the European Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) in 1973.

This article by David Arnott, PhD Researcher at the School of Environment, Natural Resources & Geography Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 3 July 2017

Are people ‘rolling the dice’ when it comes to food safety?

A new study, conducted by a team of UK based researchers involving The University of Manchester, Bangor University and the University of Liverpool, known as the ENIGMA Project, has revealed the levels of bad behaviours in UK kitchens which increase the public’s risk of getting food poisoning.

Publication date: 29 June 2017

Artists and architects think differently compared to other people

Architects, painters and sculptors conceive of spaces in different ways from other people and from each other, finds a new study by University College London and Bangor University researchers.

When asked to talk about images of places, painters are more likely to describe the depicted space as a two-dimensional image, while architects are more likely to focus on paths and the boundaries of the space.

Publication date: 28 June 2017

Tech firms want to detect your emotions and expressions, but people don't like it

As revealed in a patent filing, Facebook is interested in using webcams and smartphone cameras to read our emotions, and track expressions and reactions. The idea is that by understanding emotional behaviour, Facebook can show us more of what we react positively to in our Facebook news feeds and less of what we do not – whether that’s friends’ holiday photos, or advertisements.

This might appear innocuous, but consider some of the detail. In addition to smiles, joy, amazement, surprise, humour and excitement, the patent also lists negative emotions. Possibly being read for signs of disappointment, confusion, indifference, boredom, anger, pain and depression is neither innocent, nor fun.

This article by Andrew McStay, Reader in Advertising and Digital Media, School of Creative Studies & Media Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 27 June 2017

Bangor science project wins EU award

BREAD4PLA, a green science and technology project in which Bangor University’s research played a significant role, has been awarded one of the two ''Green Awards'' as one of the best LIFE Environment Projects of the last 25 years.

Publication date: 19 June 2017

Bangor University assists development of 'dementia-friendly' church groups

Five groups of churches across North and Mid Wales have been allocated funding to develop dementia-friendly community projects and work towards becoming “dementia friendly”.

The funding comes from Bangor University’s ESRC Impact Acceleration Account (IAA)* and has been awarded to Professor Bob Woods and Revd Dr Bob Friedrich. It follows a conference at Llangollen Pavilion where 78 delegates from Welsh churches gathered to hear how to create Dementia Friendly Churches.

Publication date: 19 May 2017

Urgency scientific expedition to assess climate induced death of coral reefs

A team of scientists led by a Bangor University professor have recently returned from a scientific expedition to the remote and largely uninhabited Chagos Archipelago in the British Indian Ocean Territory (BIOT).

Publication date: 12 May 2017