Latest Research News

Exploring the economics of sight-saving technology

Over two million people in the UK are living with sight loss. This will double to nearly four million people by 2050 as the population ages and underlying causes like obesity and diabetes increase. This places huge pressure on NHS eye care services. 

The 2016 Royal National Institute for the Blind (RNIB) report highlighted that sight loss is estimated to cost over £28 billion to the UK economy.

Research into new sight-saving technology could improve the lives of people at risk of sight loss and provide saving to the NHS and wider economy.

Two researchers from Centre for Health Economics and Medicines Evaluation CHEME,  are co-investigators on the optical coherence tomography (OCT) study, which has been awarded £1.3 million of funding from the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Invention for Innovation (i4i) Programme. 

Publication date: 23 November 2017

Different types of alcohol elicit different emotional responses

Different types of alcohol elicit different emotional responses,  but spirits are most frequently associated with feelings of aggression, suggests research published in the online journal BMJ Open.

Publication date: 22 November 2017

Bangor University opens the first nuclear research institute in Wales

The first nuclear research institute in Wales has opened at Bangor University.  The Nuclear Futures Institute has been established with funding from the Welsh Government’s Sêr Cymru programme, which is helping to attract world leading researchers to Wales, with funding also coming from the European Regional Development Fund and from the University.

Publication date: 16 November 2017

Exercise training alone does not lead to weight loss in females in the medium term

New research from Bangor University has shown that exercise training alone does not lead to weight loss in women.

Publication date: 15 November 2017

Blue Planet II: can we really halt the coral reef catastrophe?

The third episode of the BBC’s Blue Planet II spectacularly described a series of fascinating interactions between species on some of the most pristine reefs in the world. These reefs, analogous to bustling cities, are powered by sunlight, and provide space and services for a wealth of marine life.

This article by John Turner, Professor & Dean of Postgraduate Research, School of Ocean Sciences was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 15 November 2017

World War One U-boat partnership project gets green light from Heritage Lottery Fund for Wales’ Year of the Sea, 2018

The Heritage Lottery Fund has announced a grant of £409,700 for the Royal Commission’s partnership project: Commemorating the Forgotten U-boat War around the Welsh Coast, 1914-18.  Thanks to money raised by National Lottery players, over the next two years the project will use the latest imaging techniques to reveal underwater wrecks from the Great War, and will support coastal communities around Wales to tell their previously untold stories about the Great War at Sea.

Publication date: 15 November 2017

Lecturer Alys Conran’s debut novel named Wales' Book of the Year 2017

Creative Writer and Lecturer Alys Conran is the stand- out winner at this year’s Wales Book of the Year/ Llyfr y Flwyddyn, winning a hat-trick of Awards, scooping not only the one of the main prizes, the English Book of the year Award, a specially commissioned trophy designed and created by the artist Angharad Pearce Jones, and a £4000 prize, but also winning the Rhys Davies Trust Fiction Award English fiction Award and the People’s Choice Award, all for her debut novel Pigeon.

Publication date: 14 November 2017

Why Holocaust jokes can only be told by a Jewish comedian

When Larry David joked about chatting up women in Nazi concentration camps recently he caused a minor storm of outrage.

David has joked about the Holocaust before. In the comedy show he co-created, Seinfeld, an entire episode is devoted to Schindler’s List. In his own show, Curb Your Enthusiasm, he plays Wagner (a favourite composer of Adolf Hitler) to a co-religionist who accuses him of being a self-hater. He invites a cast member of the reality show Survivor to meet a Holocaust survivor and they proceed to argue over who had it worse off. Many suggested David’s jokes weren’t in good taste, that he had crossed a line this time. But had he?

This article by Nathan Abrams, Professor of Film Studies at the School of Ctreative Studies & Media was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 9 November 2017

Melting ice sheets will have global impact on ocean tides

Whilst it is widely accepted that sea level is rising because of the melting of the massive sheets covering Greenland and Antarctica, a new paper in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans, (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JC013109/abstract), by scientists at Bangor University in collaboration with Harvard and Oregon State Universities in the US, and McGill University in Canada, shows that the impact of the melting of these ice sheets will go far beyond just changing water levels. It could have further reaching impacts on global climate.

The new results show that sea level does not increase uniformly across the globe in response to melting of the polar ice sheets. In fact, sea level changes in response to ice loss are highly spatially variable, especially close to the retreating ice sheets. The new results, which are obtained with a numerical model of the global tides, show that the tidal changes due to ice sheet collapse and associated sea level changes will be highly variable and affect a number of different important processes. 

Publication date: 8 November 2017

Want to become self-compassionate? Run a marathon

Unsurprisingly, running a marathon is tough. It takes months of training before runners even make it to the starting line and this preparation can, at times, feel like punishment. The marathon runner in training can often be found limping around with blisters, sore muscles and blackened or lost toenails. Not, perhaps, an image we might naturally associate with the idea of “self-compassion”.

A relatively new concept, self-compassion has been hailed as a more robust alternative to self-esteem. While compassion refers to the demonstration of sympathy and concern for others in times of suffering, self-compassion entails showing this same understanding to ourselves.

This article by Rhi Willmot, PhD Researcher in Behavioural and Positive Psychology, at the School of Psychology, was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 3 November 2017

Putting poverty under the spotlight

Bangor University’s School of Social Sciences is combining discussion and drama to put the spotlight on poverty at a public event on Wednesday 8 November.

Poverty: Local, National and International’ will showcase pioneering research from academics and students at the School, which shows how poverty affects people's identities and shapes their lives. The event forms part of a week of the UK’s Economic & Social Research Council Festival of Social Sciences public engagement activities.

Publication date: 30 October 2017

Can we stop fake news in the next 10 years?

Vian Bakir (Prof. in Political Communication and Journalism at Bangor University's School of Creative Studies & Media) is pessimistic, but urges us not to give up. Andrew McStay (Prof in Digital Life at Bangor University) is more optimistic.

Speaking recently at the CommsCymru conference on trust, Bakir gave an overview of the various solutions to fake news found in the 79 submissions to the UK Parliament’s ongoing Fake News Inquiry. (This overview of proposed solutions was written with Bangor University’s Professor of Digital Life, Andrew McStay.)

Publication date: 30 October 2017

Scientists call for more research on how human activities affect the seabed

A group of UK scientists, co-ordinated by the University of Southampton, has published extensive research into how industry and environmental change are affecting our seafloors, but say more work is needed to help safeguard these complex ecosystems and the benefits they provide to people for the future.

Publication date: 25 September 2017

Why we taught psychology students how to run a marathon

This article by , PhD Researcher in Behavioural and Positive Psychology, Bangor University, was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Mike Fanelli, champion marathon runner and coach, tells his athletes to divide their race into thirds. “Run the first part with your head,” he says, “the middle part with your personality, and the last part with your heart.” Sage advice – particularly if you are a third year psychology student at Bangor University, preparing for one of the final milestones in your undergraduate experience: running the Liverpool Marathon.

Publication date: 14 September 2017

North West Cancer Research earmarks multi-million pounds’ worth of cancer research funding at Bangor University

A charity dedicated to funding life-saving cancer research in North Wales has announced it will contribute £1.34 million to advancing cancer research at Bangor University.

Publication date: 14 September 2017