Latest News

We've located the part of the brain which understands social interactions

The ability to quickly detect and recognise the purpose of a social interaction is as indispensable today as it would have been to our ancient ancestors – but how does the brain do it?

This article by Jon Walbrin, PhD Researcher in Cognitive Neuroscience, at the School of Psychology, was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.



Publication date: 20 March 2018

Six common misconceptions about meditation

Dusana Dorjee, Bangor University Meditation has been hailed as a way to boost mental health, help chronic pain, reduce stress and build a new appreciation for the world around us. 

Publication date: 19 March 2018

Working to safeguard the public against viruses and antibiotic resistant bacteria

Scientists working to reduce risk the risks to the public from exposure to viruses and antibiotic resistant bacteria in the water environment are meeting to share their research and discuss next steps today (14 March at the Royal Geographic Society, London).

Publication date: 14 March 2018

All of Stanley Kubrick’s films were Jewish author finds

Jewishness threads through all of legendary director Stanley Kubrick’s films, a new book finds. Kubrick, who died almost twenty years ago, was famously silent on the meaning of his films. But a new study, Stanley Kubrick: New York Jewish Intellectual by Bangor University professor, Nathan Abrams, shows how it underpinned every film he made.

Publication date: 1 March 2018

Royal Support for Scaling Up Collaborative Coral Reef Conservation

Recently, HRH The Prince of Wales, drew attention to the economic drivers behind coral reef degradation and the investments required to ensure the long-term health of these vital marine habitats.  Professor John Turner and Dr Gareth Williams from the School of Ocean Sciences were among an invited audience of UN envoys, ambassadors, financiers, conservationists and reef managers to raise the urgency of scaling up resilience and recovery of the world’s coral reefs, with a particular focus on the role of the private sector and philanthropy.

Publication date: 1 March 2018

Bangor researchers contribute to advancing dementia research strategy

Dr Gill Windle and Emeritus Professor Bob Woods, of the Dementia Services Development centre, part of BIHMR in the School of Healthcare Sciences were part of the Alzheimer’s Society taskforce of leading UK clinicians and researchers in dementia, UK funders of dementia research, people with dementia and carer representatives developing the first ‘dementia research roadmap for prevention, diagnosis, intervention and care by 2025’.

Publication date: 23 February 2018

Knowing how and where to look reduces driving risks

Training young and new drivers so that they pay attention to their peripheral vision could reduce road traffic accidents. Road traffic accidents are one of the leading causes of death globally and young novice drivers are the most likely to be involved.

Publication date: 21 February 2018

Brewing Sustainable Craft Beer in Wales

Recent market research has shown that alcohol consumption in Britain has fallen by 18% since 2004. The beer sector has also seen a decline in demand but within this sector, the Society of Independent Brewers has reported a steady growth amongst its members. The number of breweries in Britain is at a 70 year high with a total of over 1800 established independent breweries in 2015. There is no sign of the sector growth slowing and the demand for locally produced beer continues.

Publication date: 12 December 2017