Latest News

How to help people with dementia retain the power of choice

Deterioration in the ability to produce complex speech or understand what people are asking, can make it difficult for people with dementia to make choices in conventional ways. It can be simple things like deciding which clothes to wear, or what to have for dinner. But when a person is in the more advanced stages of dementia, and may not be able to speak at all, it can be difficult for those caring for them to work out what their preferences would be.

To help the estimated 280,000 people with dementia who are living in UK care homes, family members are often asked what their loved ones would prefer and notes are made by staff. But we know that people’s preferences can change, sometimes on a daily basis, and are hard to predict even by people who know them really well.

This article by Rebecca Sharp, Senior Lecturer in Psychology and Zoe Lucock, PhD researcher at the School of Psychology is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 15 November 2018

Transforming education in Wales in partnership with the Welsh Government

Welsh Government has identified the need to recruit and retain inspirational leaders in order to deliver its educational mission. As a result, a clear pathway for developing leadership from middle leaders to executive headteachers has been devised. 

Bangor University and University Wales Trinity Saint David’s (Yr Athrofa) won the tender to accredit the National Consortia’s Leadership programmes, with teachers having the opportunity to gain accreditation ranging from a PGCert through to a doctoral qualification. 

Publication date: 15 November 2018

Prince Charles: the conventions that will stop him from meddling as King

Categorised by some as a “meddler”, for decades constitutional lawyers have debated whether Prince Charles will be a reformist when he succeeds the Queen. Specifically, his “spider memos” to government ministers – which evidence his views on political issues such as climate change – have been used as an indication that he would not be “politically neutral”, and would reformulate the relationship between the Crown and parliament.

This article by Stephen Clear Lecturer in Constitutional and Administrative Law, and Public Procurement at the School of Law is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 13 November 2018

Poorer children priced out of learning instruments but school music programmes benefit the wider community

Years of austerity in the UK have bitten away at school budgets, and the arts have suffered heavily. Schools can no longer afford to employ teaching assistants, so it is little wonder that local authorities have cut school music funding.

Schools are responsible for their own budgets, and musical instrument lessons that were traditionally subsidised by councils have been cut down in some districts. Now, the Musicians’ Union has found that children living in the poorest areas are no longer getting the exposure to music and the arts that they so often only get in school. With parents being asked to subside instrument lessons, 41% of low-income families have said that they cannot do so due to their limited household budget.

This article by Eira Winrow, PhD Research Candidate and Research Project Support Officer and Rhiannon Tudor Edwards, Professor of Health Economics, at the Centre for Health Economics and Medicinces Evaluation is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 13 November 2018

Innovative project by Bangor University increases the use of Welsh in the workplace

An innovative project established by Canolfan Bedwyr and Behaviour Change researchers at the University in order to increase the use of Welsh in the workplace received praise from the Welsh Language Commissioner recently.

Publication date: 12 November 2018

University to stem decline of RE teachers

Bangor University is to contribute towards increasing the number of teachers available to teach Religious Education and improve the teaching materials available to both teachers and students.

Religious Education has been facing a crisis in recent years, with teachers feeling increasingly underqualified to teach an ever-changing syllabus at GCSE and A level, while recruitment of new graduates as subject teachers is failing to keep up with demand.

A new three-year project at the University’s School of History, Philosophy, and Social Sciences will collate and develop new teaching materials for use by both teachers and students and encourage more current university students to become subject teachers.

Publication date: 7 November 2018

More experiments may help explore what works in conservation

All over the world, countless conservation projects are taking place, attempting to achieve aims from reducing habitat loss, to restoring populations of threatened species. However there is growing awareness that conservationists have not always done a good enough job at evaluating whether the things they do really work. But our new study shows that simply experimenting could change this.

This article by Julia P G Jones, Professor of Conservation Science, School of Natural Sciences is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 5 November 2018

Family habit of inheriting volunteer roles could help small charities

Though many of us live increasingly busy lives, the number of those actively involved in volunteerism in the UK is growing. In fact, every year more than 21m people volunteer at least once. But for many people, volunteering is not just a one off, or infrequent thing. In fact, it can be a legacy, a form of tradition which is often passed down through family generations.

This article by Stephanie Jones, PhD student at the School of History, Philosophy and Social Sciences, is republished from The Conversationunder a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 30 October 2018

The School of Welsh’s Residential Courses at the Urdd’s Glan-llyn Centre return for tenth year

Welsh First Language Courses (19-21 November 2018) and Second Language (21-23 November 2018)

Residential courses run in partnership with Bangor University’s School of Welsh and the Urdd’s Glan-llyn Outdoor Centre are well established among pupils and teachers. Now in their tenth year, they offer an annual opportunity for second language and first language students to come together for a packed agenda of discussions on the areas and issues that apply to their Welsh AS/A2 level courses.

Publication date: 30 October 2018

University signs global commitment to bring plastic pollution to an end

As part of its on-going commitment to sustainability, Bangor University is one of the signatories of the New Plastics Economy Global Commitment, led by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, in collaboration with UN Environmentand launched at the Our Ocean Conference in Bali (Monday 29 November).

Publication date: 29 October 2018

Cultures, challenges and injustices: Festival of Social Sciences in Bangor

From dance forms to welfare reforms, Bangor University is taking part in the Economic & Social Research Council’s Festival of Social Sciences again this year, and is inviting the public to take part in a wide variety of events.

Publication date: 29 October 2018

Students create exclusive jewellery range

An exclusive range of high quality jewellery by design students at Bangor University is currently on sale at MOSTYN in Llandudno.

The contemporary art gallery has worked with BSc Product Design degree course staff and students on a design project to create the range of jewellery items suitable for the MOSTYN shop. 

Publication date: 26 October 2018

Bangor University receives two Athena SWAN awards

Bangor University is delighted to announce that the recent Athena SWAN application for an Institution-level Bronze Award has been successful. Furthermore, the School of Ocean Sciences’ application for a department-level Bronze award was also successful. These awards recognise the university's commitment to tackling gender inequality in higher education.

Publication date: 25 October 2018

Bangor Students represent Community Engagement projects in the House of Commons

A group of Bangor University delegates delivered recently a presentation in the House of Commons in Westminster on the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Modern Languages. The event was chaired by Tonia Antoniazzi, MP for Gower, and attended by other MPs and representatives of the House of Lords, British Council, European Commission, Goethe Institut, Confucius Institute and other institutions and universities from across the UK.

Publication date: 24 October 2018

Prepare to be amazed by specimen collections at Brambell Natural History Museum

Brambell Natural History Museum, Bangor University will be joining museums from across the country for this year’s Welsh Museums Festival, which will be taking place from 27 October – 4 November.

This wonderful annual event is an opportunity for everyone who lives in Wales, or visiting over the half term, to engage with and explore the fantastic museums we have across Wales.  As ever, this year’s event will have a varied programme of events to cater for all tastes, which include exhibitions, re-enactments and workshops, through to Halloween themed activities.

Publication date: 24 October 2018

More in depth data is required to reveal the true global footprint of fishing

There has been a lot of debate recently on the extent of the global fishing footprint. A recent paper claimed that fishing affects 55% of the world’s oceans. Given that many people in the developing world rely on fish as their main source of protein, and the increasing preference for luxury fish products in countries such as China, such statistics might seem plausible.

This article by Michel Kaiser, Honorary Professor, School of Ocean Sciences, is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 23 October 2018

Edible crabs won't cope with the effects of climate change on seawater – new study

We are only just beginning to learn how aquatic organisms will respond to climate change, and the effect that this will have on their communities and ecosystems. One way to find out more is to look at whether species will be able to compensate for changes in their environment. Particularly if they can survive any immediate fluctuations in temperature, and reductions in ocean pH brought about by increasing levels of atmospheric CO₂.

This article by Nia Whiteley, Reader in Zoology (Aquatic), at the School of Natural Sciences is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 23 October 2018

Harvesting environmental data with an app

Cambodia has one of the most rapidly developing economies on earth. The country is moving from a rural to an industrial and urban economy at great speed, but its government is also eager to be sustainable and not to lose valuable reserves of natural resources, in its drive to develop.

New research by social and environmental scientists at Bangor University, (Wales, UK); New York University (USA) and a Cambodian NGO, Keosothea Nou (Society for Community Development, Cambodia), one of 13 new projects funded under the ESRC Transformative research call, will provide an overall snapshot of the country’s environmental resources, and how they are used by different individuals. This information will help the government to develop sustainable policies for the energetic country.

Publication date: 23 October 2018

We tracked coral feeding habits from space to find out which reefs could be more resilient

Coral reefs are an invaluable source of food, economic revenue, and protection for millions of people worldwide. The three-dimensional structures built by corals also provide nourishment and shelter for over a quarter of all marine organisms.

i,But coral populations are threatened by a multitude of local and global stressors. Rising ocean temperatures are disrupting the 210m-year-old symbiosis between corals and microscopic algae. When temperatures rise, the coral animal becomes stressed and expels its algal partners, in a process known as coral bleaching.

This article by Michael D. Fox, Postdoctoral Scholar, University of California San DiegoAndrew Frederick Johnson, Researcher at Scripps Insitution of Oceanography & Director of MarFishEco, University of California San Diego, and Gareth J. Williams, Lecturer, Marine BiologyBangor University is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 22 October 2018

Four Bangor University students compose 100 poems in 24 hours

On this year’s National Poetry Day, four Bangor University students took up Literature Wales’ annual challenge to compose 100 original poems in 24 hours.

Publication date: 5 October 2018

Extreme weather in Europe linked to less sea ice and warming in the Barents Sea

This article by Yueng-Djern Lenn, Senior Lecturer in Physical Oceanography, Benjamin Barton, PhD Researcher, School of Ocean Sciences and Camille Lique, Research scientist in physical oceanography, Institut Français de Recherche pour l’Exploitation de la Mer (Ifremer) was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 30 August 2018

Research methods that find serial criminals could help save tigers

A geographic profiling tool used to catch serial criminals could help reduce the casualties of human-tiger conflict, according to scientists who collaborated on an innovative conservation research study.

Publication date: 28 August 2018