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Module DXX-4532:
Forestry Field Course

Module Facts

Run by School of Natural Sciences

20 Credits or 10 ECTS Credits

Semester 2

Organiser: Dr Mark Rayment

Overall aims and purpose

This module gives students the opportunity to see the practical application of natural resource management principles that are discussed in earlier parts of the programme. During visits to areas which are managed for a range of objectives, they will meet and discuss with different stakeholders and collect information relevant to a specific research topic. The assessment develops students' understanding of: (1) the similarities and differences between current forestry policies in England, Scotland and Wales; (2) the impact of forest policy on state, private-sector and community forest management.

Course content

Overall, the aims of this module are:

• To visit and observe a range of tree-based land use systems and management practices.

• To meet stakeholders to understand their dependency on the forest resource.

• To introduce the key ecological, socio-economic and political influences on the management of natural resources by different groups of people in particular environmental contexts, and to participate in group discussions about these.

• To develop a critical and analytical attitude to the natural and managed environment.

• To gain experience with project and hypothesis design and execution.

• To develop skills in data interpretation and analyses.

By the end of the module, you should be able to:

• Identify and discuss the key ecological, socio-economic and political influences on the management of forest resources by different groups of people in the region.

• Apply principles, theories and frameworks to locally-specific conditions.

• Critically judge the usefulness of methods and the reliability of collected data as well as the significance of obtained results.

• Communicate research findings through oral or written means.

• Argue cogently and think critically within the parameters of a particular academic discipline

• Demonstrate the values of scholarship: inquiry, reflection, integrity, open mindedness, evidence-based thinking and collegiality

Assessment Criteria

threshold

The reports give a factually correct account of topics discussed during the field trip, including some quantitative information. The reports show evidence of ability to collate information from a variety of sources; the majority of the material included is relevant although some relevant literature sources are not included. An attempt has been made to link the principles and theory described in the reports to the practice(s) seen during the trip. The reports are logically structured, the majority of the writing is clear, and referencing uses a standard system.

excellent

The reports give a comprehensive and critical account of topics discussed during the field trip, including considerable quantitative information. The reports show evidence of ability to collate and critically appraise information from a variety of sources; all of the material included is relevant and all the important literature sources are included. The links between the principles and theory described in the report to the practice(s) seen during the trip are fully and thoughtfully discussed. The report is logically structured and well written, with only minor typographical errors and no mistakes in the referencing.

good

The reports give a comprehensive account of topics discussed during the field trip, including considerable quantitative information. The reports show evidence of ability to collate and appraise information from a variety of sources; all of the material included is relevant and most of the important literature sources are included. The links between the principles and theory described in the report and the practice(s) seen during the trip are discussed. The reports are logically structured and well written, with only minor typographical errors and very few mistakes in the referencing

Learning outcomes

  1. To develop a critical and analytical attitude to the natural and managed environment.

  2. Accurately apply principles, theories and frameworks to locally-specific conditions.

  3. Identify and discuss the key ecological, socio-economic and political influences on the management of forest resources by different groups of people in the region.

Assessment Methods

Type Name Description Weight
REPORT Part 2 - Site Visits Report 25
WRITTEN PLAN Part 3 - Future Changes 50
COURSEWORK Part 1 - Forest Strategies Overview 25

Teaching and Learning Strategy

Hours
Private study 160
External visit

For many students this module is the highlight of the programme. As a group we will spend time away from Bangor in a residential setting, and visit a range of forest situations. Most of these visits are arranged in collaboration with Bangor forestry alumni. One of the days includes practical forest inventory.

The weeks before the tour provide time to complete the first assessment, and do background literature research on the places that we will visit.

40

Transferable skills

  • Literacy - Proficiency in reading and writing through a variety of media
  • Numeracy - Proficiency in using numbers at appropriate levels of accuracy
  • Self-Management - Able to work unsupervised in an efficient, punctual and structured manner. To examine the outcomes of tasks and events, and judge levels of quality and importance
  • Exploring - Able to investigate, research and consider alternatives
  • Information retrieval - Able to access different and multiple sources of information
  • Inter-personal - Able to question, actively listen, examine given answers and interact sensitevely with others
  • Critical analysis & Problem Solving - Able to deconstruct and analyse problems or complex situations. To find solutions to problems through analyses and exploration of all possibilities using appropriate methods, rescources and creativity.
  • Safety-Consciousness - Having an awareness of your immediate environment, and confidence in adhering to health and safety regulations
  • Presentation - Able to clearly present information and explanations to an audience. Through the written or oral mode of communication accurately and concisely.
  • Teamwork - Able to constructively cooperate with others on a common task, and/or be part of a day-to-day working team
  • Caring - Showing concern for others; caring for children, people with disabilities and/or the elderly
  • Argument - Able to put forward, debate and justify an opinion or a course of action, with an individual or in a wider group setting
  • Self-awareness & Reflectivity - Having an awareness of your own strengths, weaknesses, aims and objectives. Able to regularly review, evaluate and reflect upon the performance of yourself and others
  • Leadership - Able to lead and manage, develop action plans and objectives, offer guidance and direction to others, and cope with the related pressures such authority can result in

Subject specific skills

  • Demonstrate awareness of the importance of risk assessment and relevant legislation
  • Recognize and apply appropriate theories and concepts from a range of disciplines.
  • Appreciate the interdisciplinary and/or reciprocal nature of relationships within the subject area.
  • Understand the provisional nature of information and appreciate competing and alternative explanations.
  • Appreciation of the complexity and diversity of processes through the study of relevant systems.
  • Apply subject knowledge to the understanding and addressing of problems.
  • Recognize the moral, ethical and social issues relating to the subject.
  • Consider issues from a range of interdisciplinary perspectives.
  • Collect, analyse and interpret primary and/or secondary data using appropriate qualitative and/or quantitative techniques.
  • Engage in debate and/or discussion with specialists and non-specialists using appropriate language.
  • Demonstrate the independence and skills required for continuing professional development

Resources

Resource implications for students

Students will be responsible for lunches and dinners. Part-time students not based in Bangor will be required to travel to Bangor for the start of the week, or to meet us *en route*.

Courses including this module

Compulsory in courses:

Optional in courses: