News Archive: December 2018

Bangor University

The Vice-Chancellor of Bangor University, Professor John G. Hughes, who was due to retire at the end of the academic year has announced that he will be retiring at the end of December 2018.

Publication date: 11 December 2018

Psychotherapy can make you richer - especially if you are a man

Psychotherapy is good for mental health, but it can be very expensive too. As economists we try to carefully model and evaluate the monetary effects of different actions and policies. So, for our recent study we decided to use our methodologies to look into psychotherapy, and work out how it can affect labour income.

This article by Noemi Mantovan, Senior Lecturer in Economics, Bangor Business School Guido Cozzi, Professor of Macroeconomics, University of St.Gallen, and Silvia GalliUniversity of St.Gallen is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 11 December 2018

Student volunteers plant hundreds of trees in Snowdonia

Students from Bangor University have planted hundreds of trees as part of an exciting wildlife project with a tourism business in Snowdonia.

The group, from the Bangor Forestry Students’ Association (BFSA), hope the new trees will improve the landscape of the world-famous Ogwen Valley, near Bethesda.

Publication date: 10 December 2018

Addressing Food Poverty

Three members of staff at Bangor University attended the inaugural meeting of The North Wales Food Poverty Alliance (NWFPA) in The OpTIC Centre St Asaph recently. 

The North Wales Food Poverty Alliance NWFP is a round table of multi-sector organisations chaired by Flintshire County Council, which aims to address the multiple challenges of food poverty in North Wales.

Publication date: 7 December 2018

Agroforestry can help the UK meet climate change commitments without cutting livestock numbers

Some 12m hectares of the UK is currently covered by agricultural grasslands which support a national lamb and beef industry worth approximately £3.7 billion. However, proposals have been made that this landscape should undergo radical changes to aid the country’s climate change commitments. A controversial government advisory report recently produced by the independent Committee on Climate Change calls for UK lamb and beef production to be reduced by up to 50%. It claims that by replacing grazing land with forestry the UK will be able to substantially decrease its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.T

his article by Charlotte Pritchard, PhD Researcher, at the School of Natural Sciences is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 7 December 2018

British Education Award Shortlist for Mark

Mark Barrow, who graduated from Bangor University earlier this year, has been nominated for a British Education Award (BEA). These Awards promote excellence in British education and celebrate individuals who have excelled within the UK education system.

Publication date: 7 December 2018

Ocean acidification will increase the iodine content of edible seaweeds and their consumers

Evidence is rapidly accumulating that ocean acidification and elevated temperatures will have catastrophic consequences for marine organisms and ecosystems. In fact, it is something we are already witnessing. Coral reefs are bleaching, while snails and other calcifying marine organisms struggle to build their shells, scales and skeletons and juvenile marine animals even struggle to navigate to suitable habitats.

This article by Georgina Brennan, Postdoctoral Research Officer, School of Natural Sciences; Dong Xu, Associate Researcher, Yellow Sea Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences, and Naihao Ye, Professor, Yellow Sea Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 7 December 2018

Why alcohol makes some people violent

National study examines dangers of adults with traumatic childhoods drinking heavily

Heavier drinkers are much more likely to be involved in violence if they have suffered high levels of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEsi), according to a new study. 

Publication date: 7 December 2018

A burst of creativity – six books published in three months!

Between September and November this year, staff and students at the School of Welsh have had a total of six books published – novels, short story collections and a volume of poetry – adding to the School’s long-established reputation in the field of creative writing.

Publication date: 6 December 2018

Bangor’s elite athletes awarded Sports Scholarships

Every year, Bangor University supports students with sporting ability by offering a number of Sports Scholarships for students studying for a degree in any subject area.

These Sports Scholarships are awarded to recognise and support sporting excellence and achievement. They are aimed at helping talented and high performance students to combine their academic study and sporting performance to assist them in achieving their full potential.

Publication date: 6 December 2018

Madagascar: fear and violence making rainforest conservation more challenging than ever

"People are too afraid to return to the village so they are sleeping in the forest or have left altogether. They have lost their stored grain and all their belongings. I don’t know how they will get by."

These are the words of Riana*, a young woman from Bevoahazo, a tiny village in the eastern rainforests of Madagascar. Bevoahazo sits on the edge of Ranomafana National Park in a UNESCO world heritage site teeming with endangered and endemic species. Security in the area has been deteriorating over the last few years but things have escalated recently.

This article by Julia P G Jones, Professor of Conservation Science at the School of Natural Sciences, is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 5 December 2018

What does gathering from the seashore mean to the modern hunter gatherer

Liz Morris-Webb, a researcher at Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences is looking for people who gather from the seashores of Wales to take part in her research.  If you forage for food, bait, money, education, medicine, research or something more unusual, you can take part.

Publication date: 5 December 2018

First meeting to develop Wales’ shellfish industry

Shellfish producers, scientists and regulators are meeting at Bangor University today (4 December) for the first workshop to develop a new Shellfish Centre. The centre will deliver the research and innovation needs of the industry and secure sustainable growth of this valuable Welsh sector.

Publication date: 4 December 2018