News Archive: January 2019

Enhanced research reporting method to improve patient care

Patients could benefit from improved care and outcomes thanks to new research reporting guidance developed from a study that Bangor University researchers contributed to.

Experts have developed an approach that enables better reporting of findings from the combination of qualitative studies such as information garnered from patient interviews and focus groups.

The study has led to the creation of the first-ever tailored reporting guidance for the methodology, known as meta-ethnography. It will give researchers and healthcare bosses greater confidence in the findings of qualitative studies and, ultimately, aid the improvement of patient care and services.

Publication date: 17 January 2019

Exercise can fast-track your workplace well-being - here's how

Exercise has been found to reduce stress, increase positive mooddecrease anxiety and alleviate depression. But you may not know that the emotional well-being associated with exercise is also linked to key attributes that can help us while we work.

This article by Rhi Willmot, PhD Researcher in Behavioural and Positive Psychology at the School of Psychology is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 17 January 2019

Bangor University placed in the top 10 of global green league

Bangor University is ranked eighth in the world for its commitment to sustainability according to an international league table of environmentally friendly institutions.

The University is one of four UK universities appearing in the Top 10 of the UI Green Metrica league table of the world’s greenest universities.

Publication date: 15 January 2019

How our unconscious visual biases change the way we perceive objects

 As the old saying goes, beauty is in the eye of the beholder. But while we can appreciate that others might hold different opinions of objects we see, not many people know that factors beyond our control can influence how we perceive the basic attributes of these objects. We might argue that something is beautiful or ugly, for example, but we would be surprised to learn that the same object is perceived as a sphere by one person but as a cube by another.

This article by Beverley Pickard-Jones, PhD Researcher, at the School of Psychology is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 15 January 2019

Investigating why oak trees are dying is helping scientists understand how infectious diseases work

British oak trees are under threat from a disease known as Acute Oak Decline. Mainly affecting mature trees, it can kill them within four to five years of symptoms appearing. However, while researchers like myself have been looking into what causes it, and trying to find a way to prevent it, our work has been hindered in part by the fact that we have to follow a set of scientific rules known as Koch’s postulates.

This article by James Doonan, Postdoctoral Research Officer, School of Natural Sciences is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 14 January 2019

Assessing the value of dementia support groups

New ageing and dementia research at Bangor University will soon be underway, with a team from the Bangor Institute of Health and Medical Research in the School of Health Sciences being the only university in Wales to be awarded funding as part of the ESRC-NIHR Dementia Research Initiative 2018.

This programme of work, led by partners at University College London, centres around people living with rare dementias, and will involve the first major study of the value of support groups for people living with or caring for someone with a rare form of dementia.

Publication date: 10 January 2019

Bangor University Venom Day attracts world-leading experts

Toxin enthusiasts from around the globe gathered in North Wales for an annual event organised by Bangor University students.

Leading academics, world experts and a TV star joined over a hundred people for the unique Venom Day conference in Bangor to discuss toxicology and venomous species.

Publication date: 10 January 2019

Why foraging for free is food for the soul

 In the past few years, there’s been a resurgence in the idea of foraging for food. The practice of hand gathering plants and animals for bait, money or the table has long taken place, but more recently top chefs have been popularising the idea, while urban foragers have told of the lengths they go to to find wild food in big cities.

This article by PhD candidate at the School of Ocean SciencesElisabeth S. Morris-Webb, is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 10 January 2019

Holocaust Memorial Day Service at Bangor University

A service to commemorate Holocaust Memorial Day 2019 will be held at the Prichard-Jones Hall, Main Arts Building, College Road, in Bangor on Monday, 28 January, from  10:30am to 11:30am.

The theme of this year’s service is ‘Torn from Home’ and will feature music and readings from local schools, members of the local community and council, the Students Union, The Chaplaincy Team, and University Staff.

The service, which is free and open to the public, will take place in the Prichard-Jones Hall, Main Arts Building, and refreshments will be served afterwards.

Publication date: 9 January 2019

“For services to tackling poverty abroad and to education in Derby”

Dr Daljit Singh Virk, a Senior Research Fellow at Bangor University is to receive the OBE.

The award recognises the impact of Dr Virk’s scientific contributions as geneticist and plant breeder as well as his leading role in establishing the Sikh faith Akaal Primary School, in Derby in 2015. The free school was established under the Academies Act.

Dr Virk has been at the heart of one of Bangor University’s most impactful research projects, which has contributed to improved food security and livelihoods for millions of households in some of the most impoverished countries.

Publication date: 8 January 2019

Archive of the Month – January 2019: George Hartley Bryan (1864-1928)

George Hartley Bryan was Professor of Pure & Applied Mathematics at Bangor from 1896 until his retirement in 1926. In 1911 he published ‘Stability in aviation; an introduction to dynamical stability as applied to the motions of aeroplanes, a book that established Bangor at the forefront of new scientific advances.

Publication date: 7 January 2019

Lynette Roberts: Welsh poet who fused touch and sight into sound

The name of Lynette Roberts may not be the first that springs to mind in the history of Welsh writing in English, possibly because her futuristic poetry of World War II still sounds new and strange. In her epic poem Gods With Stainless Ears she imagines postwar humans in a technologised, ecologically damaged landscape:

This article by Zoë Skoulding, Reader in English at the School of Languages, Literatures & Linguistics is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 2 January 2019