Latest University News

Llew a’r Crydd, a children’s show for Christmas

Theatr Clwyd and Pontio present Llew a’r Crydd, a children’s show for Christmas, as their first co-production

Emyr John has written and directed a new show in the Welsh language to be performed in Bangor and Mold.

Publication date: 18 December 2018

100 treasures of Bangor University

Visitors to Storiel, Gwynedd’s museum and art gallery can enjoy a new exhibition, 100 treasures of Bangor University, displayed in a case in the reception area. This case highlights Bangor University collections and a new exhibition is programmed for every six months.

Publication date: 18 December 2018

Almost half of all students studying a degree through the medium of Welsh, do so at Bangor University

Recent statistics have revealed that almost half of all students studying a degree through the medium of Welsh now do so at Bangor University. In addition, the largest number of lecturers teaching through the medium of Welsh is at Bangor University.

Publication date: 14 December 2018

Renowned poet receives further accolade

Carol Rumens, Professor of Creative Writing at the School of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics, has been awarded the Michal Marks Award for the best poetry pamphlet published between September 2017 and September 2018. The Award was for Bezdelki/Small Things which was launched at Pontio earlier this year.

Publication date: 14 December 2018

Teaching Fellow awarded to President of MDIS

Bangor University has awarded a prestigious Teaching Fellowship to Dr Eric Kuan, President of the Management Development Institute of Singapore (MDIS) at a special ceremony.

Publication date: 14 December 2018

Administrative justice affects us all- now is the time to give it some more thought

You may never have considered administrative justice, but it affects each one of us- and a large amount of it is devolved in Wales. This means that we have access to specific bodies to seek redress if we’re unhappy about the service we’ve received in a wide range of settings.

Sarah Nason, a Law Lecturer at Bangor University has just published a report which reviews where we are and asks where next for administrative justice in Wales by  bringing together the administrative decisions already devolved to Wales and making recommendations for the future.

Publication date: 13 December 2018

Administrative justice can make countries fairer and more equal – if it is implemented properly

There is a little known, but hugely important, justice system which impacts everyone’s life – administrative justice. Made up of various different bodies (including courts, tribunals, complaint handlers and more), it is concerned with the laws surrounding decision-making and dispute resolution of public bodies. In many countries, it deals with more cases than criminal or private civil justice.

This article by Sarah Nason, Lecturer in Administrative Law and Jurisprudence, Bangor University is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 13 December 2018

£1.85m study to investigate microbes “hitch-hiking” on marine plastics

Experts at Bangor University are working with the Universities of Stirling and Warwick on a new £1.85 million project investigating how marine plastics transport bacteria and viruses – and the impact that may have on human health.

The scientists are aiming to understand how plastics act as vehicles, with the potential to spread pathogens within coastal zones, or even from country to country, and how that affects health.

Publication date: 13 December 2018

Coastal light pollution

Have you ever given a thought to how light pollution in our coastal towns may be affecting our marine neighbours?

The School of Ocean Sciences at Bangor University is leading a new four year project funded by the Natural Environment Research Council, that will improve our understand of how light pollution from coastal towns and cities impacts life along our shores.

Publication date: 13 December 2018

Psychotherapy can make you richer - especially if you are a man

Psychotherapy is good for mental health, but it can be very expensive too. As economists we try to carefully model and evaluate the monetary effects of different actions and policies. So, for our recent study we decided to use our methodologies to look into psychotherapy, and work out how it can affect labour income.

This article by Noemi Mantovan, Senior Lecturer in Economics, Bangor Business School Guido Cozzi, Professor of Macroeconomics, University of St.Gallen, and Silvia GalliUniversity of St.Gallen is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 11 December 2018

Bangor University

The Vice-Chancellor of Bangor University, Professor John G. Hughes, who was due to retire at the end of the academic year has announced that he will be retiring at the end of December 2018.

Publication date: 11 December 2018

Student volunteers plant hundreds of trees in Snowdonia

Students from Bangor University have planted hundreds of trees as part of an exciting wildlife project with a tourism business in Snowdonia.

The group, from the Bangor Forestry Students’ Association (BFSA), hope the new trees will improve the landscape of the world-famous Ogwen Valley, near Bethesda.

Publication date: 10 December 2018

Ocean acidification will increase the iodine content of edible seaweeds and their consumers

Evidence is rapidly accumulating that ocean acidification and elevated temperatures will have catastrophic consequences for marine organisms and ecosystems. In fact, it is something we are already witnessing. Coral reefs are bleaching, while snails and other calcifying marine organisms struggle to build their shells, scales and skeletons and juvenile marine animals even struggle to navigate to suitable habitats.

This article by Georgina Brennan, Postdoctoral Research Officer, School of Natural Sciences; Dong Xu, Associate Researcher, Yellow Sea Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences, and Naihao Ye, Professor, Yellow Sea Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 7 December 2018

Agroforestry can help the UK meet climate change commitments without cutting livestock numbers

Some 12m hectares of the UK is currently covered by agricultural grasslands which support a national lamb and beef industry worth approximately £3.7 billion. However, proposals have been made that this landscape should undergo radical changes to aid the country’s climate change commitments. A controversial government advisory report recently produced by the independent Committee on Climate Change calls for UK lamb and beef production to be reduced by up to 50%. It claims that by replacing grazing land with forestry the UK will be able to substantially decrease its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.T

his article by Charlotte Pritchard, PhD Researcher, at the School of Natural Sciences is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 7 December 2018

British Education Award Shortlist for Mark

Mark Barrow, who graduated from Bangor University earlier this year, has been nominated for a British Education Award (BEA). These Awards promote excellence in British education and celebrate individuals who have excelled within the UK education system.

Publication date: 7 December 2018

Addressing Food Poverty

Three members of staff at Bangor University attended the inaugural meeting of The North Wales Food Poverty Alliance (NWFPA) in The OpTIC Centre St Asaph recently. 

The North Wales Food Poverty Alliance NWFP is a round table of multi-sector organisations chaired by Flintshire County Council, which aims to address the multiple challenges of food poverty in North Wales.

Publication date: 7 December 2018

Why alcohol makes some people violent

National study examines dangers of adults with traumatic childhoods drinking heavily

Heavier drinkers are much more likely to be involved in violence if they have suffered high levels of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEsi), according to a new study. 

Publication date: 7 December 2018

Bangor’s elite athletes awarded Sports Scholarships

Every year, Bangor University supports students with sporting ability by offering a number of Sports Scholarships for students studying for a degree in any subject area.

These Sports Scholarships are awarded to recognise and support sporting excellence and achievement. They are aimed at helping talented and high performance students to combine their academic study and sporting performance to assist them in achieving their full potential.

Publication date: 6 December 2018

A burst of creativity – six books published in three months!

Between September and November this year, staff and students at the School of Welsh have had a total of six books published – novels, short story collections and a volume of poetry – adding to the School’s long-established reputation in the field of creative writing.

Publication date: 6 December 2018

Madagascar: fear and violence making rainforest conservation more challenging than ever

"People are too afraid to return to the village so they are sleeping in the forest or have left altogether. They have lost their stored grain and all their belongings. I don’t know how they will get by."

These are the words of Riana*, a young woman from Bevoahazo, a tiny village in the eastern rainforests of Madagascar. Bevoahazo sits on the edge of Ranomafana National Park in a UNESCO world heritage site teeming with endangered and endemic species. Security in the area has been deteriorating over the last few years but things have escalated recently.

This article by Julia P G Jones, Professor of Conservation Science at the School of Natural Sciences, is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 5 December 2018

What does gathering from the seashore mean to the modern hunter gatherer

Liz Morris-Webb, a researcher at Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences is looking for people who gather from the seashores of Wales to take part in her research.  If you forage for food, bait, money, education, medicine, research or something more unusual, you can take part.

Publication date: 5 December 2018

First meeting to develop Wales’ shellfish industry

Shellfish producers, scientists and regulators are meeting at Bangor University today (4 December) for the first workshop to develop a new Shellfish Centre. The centre will deliver the research and innovation needs of the industry and secure sustainable growth of this valuable Welsh sector.

Publication date: 4 December 2018

Vice-Chancellor to retire in August 2019

Bangor University’s Vice-Chancellor, Professor John G. Hughes has announced that he is to retire next August after nine years in charge.

Professor Hughes is only the seventh Vice-Chancellor in the University’s 135 year history, and the University will shortly be advertising for a successor.

Publication date: 30 November 2018

Adventure and Beyond: Annual North Wales Tourism Conference, 2018

As thrill seekers head to north Wales, the ‘capital’ of adventure tourism, Bangor University’s Pontio Innovation Centre and Go North Wales, co-host the annual North Wales Tourism conference in Pontio on 6 December. The title of the conference is “Adventure and Beyond”.

Keynote speakers are include Lord Ellis- Thomas, Minister for Culture, Tourism and Sport, television presenter, Kate Humble,  writer and public speaker, John Thackara as well as Yangtze River Walk adventurer and extreme athlete, Ash Dykes, from North Wales, who will join by video conference.

Publication date: 30 November 2018

Rare woodland wildlife at risk because of 50-year-old tree felling rules

This article by Craig Shuttleworth, Honorary Visiting Research Fellow, at the School of Natural Sciences is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article

In the UK it is illegal to deliberately kill or injure red squirrels, disturb them while they are using a nest, or destroy their nests. Yet, although the 1981 Wildlife and Countryside Act provides these protections, there is a legal anomaly in England and Wales – one that can potentially undermine the conservation of the red squirrel, along with every other rare and endangered forest plant or animal species. Although rare woodland species are protected, the habitat they dwell in is generally not.

Publication date: 30 November 2018

Chemsex and PrEP reliance are fuelling a rise in syphilis among men who have sex with men

No one is entirely sure about the origins of syphilis, a sexually transmitted infection caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum. The first recorded outbreak in Europe appeared during the 1495 invasion of Naples, where it led to widespread disease and death, particularly among troops on the French side. Later, disbanded armies helped to spread syphilis, the “great pox”, across Europe, where the disease rapidly became endemic.

Transmitted from person-to-person primarily through sexual contact, the first symptom of syphilis to appear is usually a small, round and painless skin ulcer, referred to as a canker, at the site of infection. This canker will eventually heal and disappear but the bacteria remain, circulating in the blood and potentially leading to severe health consequences, including heart disease, dementia and blindness.

This article by Simon Bishop, Lecturer in Public Health and Primary Care, at the School of Health Sciences is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 30 November 2018

What seabirds can tell us about the tide

When the UK's Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) set out to tag razorbills, their aim was to track their behaviour and movements along the coast of North Wales. The tag data revealed that, at night, these seabirds spent a lot of their time idle on the sea surface. "We saw this as an opportunity to re-use the data and test if the birds might be drifting with the tidal current," says Matt Cooper, a Master of Oceanography graduate from Bangor University in Wales. It turns out they were, according to a new study led by Cooper that shows the potential of using seabirds to measure ocean currents. The results are published today in the European Geosciences Union journal Ocean Science.

Publication date: 29 November 2018

Why are we getting these warm wild winds?

Is there a cold winter on the way?

Whilst our weather has warmed in the last couple of days with the arrival of mild westerly winds from the Atlantic, there are indications further afield which may point to a cold winter for Wales.

Scientists monitoring ocean conditions over the tropical Pacific Ocean have detected a warming of the surface water which is a strong indicator of the onset of a major global climate event, known as an “El Nino”.

Publication date: 29 November 2018

Virtual Reality enables you to swim with sharks - in Welsh!

"Ocean Rift", one of the world’s most popular Virtual Reality programmes is the first to be available in Welsh for use with VR headsets. (English version here).

Created by Dr Llŷr ap Cenydd, a lecturer at Bangor University’s School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering, Ocean Rift was one of the first programmes to be released alongside the Samsung Gear VR headset, and has become one of the most popular with an estimated 2.5 million downloads since 2013.

Publication date: 28 November 2018

What planet Earth might look like when the next supercontinent forms – four scenarios

The outer layer of the Earth, the solid crust we walk on, is made up of broken pieces, much like the shell of a broken egg. These pieces, the tectontic plates, move around the planet at speeds of a few centimetres per year. Every so often they come together and combine into a supercontinent, which remains for a few hundred million years before breaking up. The plates then disperse or scatter and move away from each other, until they eventually – after another 400-600 million years – come back together again.

This article by Mattias Green, Reader in Physical Oceanography, Bangor UniversityHannah Sophia Davies, PhD Researcher, Universidade de Lisboa , and Joao C. Duarte, Researcher and Coordinator of the Marine Geology and Geophysics Group, Universidade de Lisboa is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 27 November 2018

M-SParc on winning streak

M-SParc, Wales’ first dedicated Science Park, which opened on the 1st of March 2018 is on a winning streak! Recentlly, the project won Digital Construction Project of the Year 2018 at the Constructing Excellence National Awards, secured a new contract to establish an Enterprise Hub in partnership with Menter Mon, and organised and hosted the first Energy Summit for North West Wales celebrating the success of energy companies in the region.

Publication date: 27 November 2018

Welsh Food Advisory Appointment

Dr Philip Hollington, of the School of Natural Sciences, has been appointed to the Welsh Food Advisory Committee for a period of three years.

Publication date: 26 November 2018

Poetry pamphlet shortlisting

A poetry pamphlet by Carol Rumens, Professor of Creatiive Writing, launched at Pontio this Spring, has been shortlisted for the Michael Marks Award for the best poetry pamphlet published between September 2017 and September 2018.

Publication date: 26 November 2018

Four Bangor University students compose 100 poems in 24 hours

On this year’s National Poetry Day, four Bangor University students took up Literature Wales’ annual challenge to compose 100 original poems in 24 hours.

Publication date: 5 October 2018