Module HPH-4025:
Disseminating Research

Module Facts

Run by School of History, Philosophy and Social Sciences

20 Credits or 10 ECTS Credits

Organiser: Dr Lowri Ann Rees

Overall aims and purpose

This module will enable students to engage directly with the dissemination of research. They will attend research seminars as directed to observe and interact with the presentation of research. Students will then present their own research by delivering a research paper at the end of the module, thereby bringing the process of disseminating research full-circle. The module will test students on their ability to critically analyse three research papers, and their ability to effectively present their own research to an academic audience. In their critiques, students will be expected to identify the aims and objectives of the research paper, outline content, identify, summarise and analyse key arguments and debates addressed, and place the paper within the broader historiographical framework, referencing historiographical works. These critiques will form part of a log book. The final component of the module assessment will comprise a 20-minute presentation delivered by each student as part of a postgraduate mini-conference at the end of the module.

Course content

Following an introductory session at the start of semester 1, a series of seminars will be held during semester 1 and 2 to provide an ongoing forum of discussion alongside the research seminars.

Attendance at subject appropriate research seminars during semester 1 and 2. Students will also be encouraged to attend seminars outside their discipline.

Postgraduate mini-conference, scheduled for May 2018. Each student to present a 20-minute research paper on their research.

Work independently reviewing notes taken during research seminars, reading review essays as examples of good practice, and compiling critiques for log book . Plan research paper to be delivered at the postgraduate mini-conference.

Assessment Criteria

good

(B- B B+) Comprehensive coverage of chosen field of enquiry. High level of organisation and structure. Advanced and sustained level of critical analysis of research paper. Engagement with historiography, but may not be consistently sustained throughout, or lacking critical engagement.

excellent

(A- and above) Sophisticated and substantial understanding and appreciation of a substantial body of research. Complex and sophisticated appreciation of most of the concerns of the research paper. Strong and consistent critical engagement with the historiography.

threshold

(C- C C+) Some evidence of substantial and pertinent reading, though with a limited understanding and appreciation. A limited understanding of the implications of some of the concerns raised in the research paper. Little to no engagement with historiography.

Learning outcomes

  1. Be able to place research within a broader historiographical framework

  2. Present a critical review in an appropriate scholarly manner and to a professional standard

  3. Foster an awareness of differing critical attitudes within different fields of enquiry, including reference to relevant historiographical works, and a bibliography.

  4. Ability to present a research seminar paper to an academic audience knowledgeably, clearly and coherently. Papers should demonstrate engagement with a broader historiographical framework.

Assessment Methods

Type Name Description Weight
Logbook 75
Presentation 25

Teaching and Learning Strategy

Hours
Private study

Work independently reviewing notes taken during research seminars, reading review essays as examples of good practice, and compiling critiques for log book . Plan research paper to be delivered at the postgraduate mini-conference (c.160 hours private study).

160
Seminar

Following an introductory session at the start of semester 1, a series of seminars will be held during semester 1 and 2 to provide an ongoing forum of discussion alongside the research seminars (c.20 hours).

20
 

Attendance at subject appropriate research seminars during semester 1 and 2. Students will also be encouraged to attend seminars outside their discipline (c.14 hours).

14
 

Postgraduate mini-conference, scheduled for May 2018. Each student to present a 20-minute research paper on their research (c.6 hours).

6

Transferable skills

  • Literacy - Proficiency in reading and writing through a variety of media
  • Computer Literacy - Proficiency in using a varied range of computer software
  • Self-Management - Able to work unsupervised in an efficient, punctual and structured manner. To examine the outcomes of tasks and events, and judge levels of quality and importance
  • Exploring - Able to investigate, research and consider alternatives
  • Information retrieval - Able to access different and multiple sources of information
  • Inter-personal - Able to question, actively listen, examine given answers and interact sensitevely with others
  • Critical analysis & Problem Solving - Able to deconstruct and analyse problems or complex situations. To find solutions to problems through analyses and exploration of all possibilities using appropriate methods, rescources and creativity.
  • Argument - Able to put forward, debate and justify an opinion or a course of action, with an individual or in a wider group setting
  • Self-awareness & Reflectivity - Having an awareness of your own strengths, weaknesses, aims and objectives. Able to regularly review, evaluate and reflect upon the performance of yourself and others

Subject specific skills

  • understanding the complexity of change over time; in specific contexts and chronologies
  • being sensitive to the differences, or the "otherness" of the past, and the difficulty to using it as a guide to present or future action
  • being sensitive to the role of perceptions of the past in contemporary cultures
  • producing logical and structured arguments supported by relevant evidence
  • marshalling and critically appraising other people's arguments, including listening and questioning
  • making effective and appropriate use of relevant information technology
  • making critical and effective use of information retrieval skills using paper-based and electronic resources
  • appreciating and being sensitive to different cultures and dealing with unfamiliar situations
  • critical evaluation of one's own and others' opinions

Resources

Resource implications for students

No need for students to purchase books - encouraged to use the books and articles available in the library and electronically.

Reading list

John H. Arnold, History: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford, 2000). Stefan Berger, ‘The rise and fall of “critical” historiography? Some reflections on the historiographical agenda of the left in Britain, France and Germany at the end of the twentieth century’, European Review of History, 3:2 (1996), 213-32. Ernst Breisach, Historiography : Ancient, Medieval, and Modern (Chicago, 2007). Peter Burke, (ed.), New Perspectives on Historical Writing (2nd ed. Cambridge, 2001). Peter Burke, What is Cultural History? (Cambridge, 2008). J. W. Burrow, A history of histories : epics, chronicles, romances and inquiries from Herodotus and Thucydides to the twentieth century (2007). David Cannadine (ed.), What is History Now? (New York, 2002). Conal Furay and Michael J. Salevouris, The Methods and Skills of History: A Practical Guide (3rd edn, 2009). James B. Gardner and Peter S. LaPaglia (eds), Public History: Essays from the Field (Malabar, Florida, 1999). Ludmilla Jordanova, History in Practice (London & New York 2000). Tracey Loughran, A Practical Guide to Studying History (Bloomsbury, 2017) John Tosh, The Pursuit of History: Aims, methods and new directions in the study of history (Hoboken, 2015).

Students will also be encouraged to read examples of published critical review essays and articles in order to build on their analytical skills and historiographical engagement. This will help prepare them to write their own critiques. Samples of review essays/articles will be available on Blackboard, but students are also expected to find their own by searching through academic journals. The Bibliography of British and Irish History is a good starting point to search for review essays.

Courses including this module

Compulsory in courses: