Module DXX-3615:
Environmental Policy

Module Facts

Run by School of Natural Sciences

10 Credits or 5 ECTS Credits

Semester 1

Organiser: Dr Neal Hockley

Overall aims and purpose

  1. To help students gain an appreciation of the importance and limitations of policy in determining the way in which the environment is managed.
  2. To give students an understanding of the policy-making process in the UK and internationally, the influences upon it, and its impacts.
  3. To equip students with the concepts and skills with which to understand, critically analyse and contribute to the policy-making process, including theoretical and empirical insights into this process from economics, political economy and political science.

Course content

Policy and the environment Reasons for and against government intervention Basic concepts of government, sovereignty, politics, democracy. General features of political systems and governments in the UK and internationally. The role of diverse actors in the policy process: including politicians and parliaments, governments, bureaucracies and agencies, NGOs, media, interest groups and supranational bodies. Theories of politics and policy-making, including international relations.

Assessment Criteria

excellent

Grade A- to A** Examination answers Clearly summarise information given during the module (including directed reading), and acquired through wider study, and present it in a way that directly answers the question displaying very high critical and synthetic ability. Assessment Provide an exceptionally clear synthesis of (and cite sources for) a wide range of information relevant to the chosen policy area. Present it in a way that directly answers the question displaying very high critical and synthetic ability.

threshold

Grade D- to D+ Examination answers Clearly summarise information given during the module (including directed reading) and apply it in a way that is relevant to the question. Display a basic understanding of the issues involved. Assessment Clearly summarise (and cite sources for) information relevant to the chosen policy area and apply it in a way that is relevant to the question. Display a basic understanding of the issues involved.

good

Grade C- to B+ Examination answers Clearly summarise information given during the module (including directed reading) and apply it in a way that directly answers the question with coherent argument and critical synthesis of the issues involved. Assessment Provide a clear synthesis of (and cite sources for) information relevant to the chosen policy area. and apply it in a way that directly answers the question with coherent argument and critical synthesis of the issues involved.

Learning outcomes

  1. Describe and critically evaluate major features of the policy-making process in the UK and internationally; the influences upon that process and its impacts.

  2. Demonstrate knowledge of key concepts important for analysing environmental policy.

  3. Be able to use these key concepts to analyse real-life environmental policy case studies.

  4. Summarise and communicate policy-relevant information in a professional, logical and coherent manner, including arguing for or against a particular policy.

  5. Understand the reasons for or against government intervention in environmental issues.

Assessment Methods

Type Name Description Weight
Policy Analysis Report 2 75
Policy Analysis Report 1 25

Teaching and Learning Strategy

Hours
Individual Project

Develop individual coursework essay, provide and receive peer feedback on partner's essay.

20
Private study

Private study (or in groups).

50
Seminar

4x2hr seminars (students are expected to attend at least 2 of the 4 seminars).

8
Lecture

Lectures, including significant component of group exercises to apply and illustrate the principles learned.

10
Study group

Reading and discussion groups. Students are encouraged to work in groups to prepare for the seminars

10
Study group

Drop in revision/study group (final session of the module).

2

Transferable skills

  • Literacy - Proficiency in reading and writing through a variety of media
  • Self-Management - Able to work unsupervised in an efficient, punctual and structured manner. To examine the outcomes of tasks and events, and judge levels of quality and importance
  • Exploring - Able to investigate, research and consider alternatives
  • Information retrieval - Able to access different and multiple sources of information
  • Inter-personal - Able to question, actively listen, examine given answers and interact sensitevely with others
  • Critical analysis & Problem Solving - Able to deconstruct and analyse problems or complex situations. To find solutions to problems through analyses and exploration of all possibilities using appropriate methods, rescources and creativity.
  • Presentation - Able to clearly present information and explanations to an audience. Through the written or oral mode of communication accurately and concisely.
  • Teamwork - Able to constructively cooperate with others on a common task, and/or be part of a day-to-day working team
  • Mentoring - Able to support, help, guide, inspire and/or coach others
  • Management - Able to utilise, coordinate and control resources (human, physical and/or financial)
  • Argument - Able to put forward, debate and justify an opinion or a course of action, with an individual or in a wider group setting
  • Self-awareness & Reflectivity - Having an awareness of your own strengths, weaknesses, aims and objectives. Able to regularly review, evaluate and reflect upon the performance of yourself and others

Subject specific skills

  • Recognize and apply appropriate theories and concepts from a range of disciplines.
  • Consider issues from a range of interdisciplinary perspectives.
  • Apply subject knowledge to the understanding and addressing of problems.
  • Appreciation of the reciprocal nature of human-environmental relationships.
  • Engage in debate and/or discussion with specialists and non-specialists using appropriate language.
  • Understand the provisional nature of information and appreciate competing and alternative explanations.
  • Recognize the moral, ethical and social issues relating to the subject.

Resources

Resource implications for students

None

Talis Reading list

http://readinglists.bangor.ac.uk/modules/dxx-3615.html

Courses including this module

Compulsory in courses:

Optional in courses: