Latest News

Bangor scholars contribute to The Cambridge History of Welsh Literature

An extensive new volume on the literature of Wales, from its origins to the present day, features contributions from numerous Bangor University experts and will be officially launched at the Hay Festival on 24 May.

The Cambridge History of Welsh Literature (Cambridge University Press, 2019) is described by the publisher as being the “biggest history of Welsh literature ever published” and is a chronological guide to fifteen centuries of Welsh literature and Welsh writing in English.

Publication date: 23 May 2019

Is there such thing as a ‘European identity’?

The outcome of the UK’s 2016 referendum on EU membership has sent shockwaves across Europe. Among other impacts, it has prompted debates around the issues whether a “European culture” or a “European identity” actually exist or whether national identities still dominate.

This article by Nikolaos Papadogiannis, Lecturer in Modern and Contemporary History at the School of History, Philosophy and Social Sciences is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 22 May 2019

“Epic novel” reaches Wales Book of the Year 2019 Shortlist

A work described by one contemporary critic as an “epic novel...a river of a story that flows like life itself” has been placed on the shortlist for one of the Wales Book of the Year 2019 awards.

Ynys Fadog by Professor Jerry Hunter, Pro Vice-chancellor and Professor at the School of Welsh and Celtic Studies, tells the story of a Welsh family attempting to create a better life for its members during a time of great upheaval in the still-new America. The 580-page novel sits alongside Llyfr Glas Nebo (Manon Steffan Ros) and Esgyrn (Heiddwen Tomos) in the Fiction category shortlist.

Publication date: 14 May 2019

Game of Thrones: neither Arya Stark nor Brienne of Tarth are unusual — medieval romance heroines did it all before

Brienne of Tarth and Arya Stark are very unlike what some may expect of a typical medieval lady. The only daughter of a minor knight, Brienne has trained up as a warrior and has been knighted for her valour in the field of battle. Meanwhile Arya, a tomboyish teen when we first met her in series one, is a trained and hardened assassin. No damsels in distress, then – they’ve chosen to defy their society’s expectations and follow their own paths.

This article by Raluca Radulescu, Professor of Medieval Literature and English Literature at the School of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics is republished fromThe Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 8 May 2019

New book by Bangor Professor set to rethink the music of ‘America’s greatest living composer’

A new book coedited by a Professor of Music and Media at Bangor University aims to rethink the music of one of America’s greatest living composers, Steve Reich.  

Publication date: 1 May 2019

Ligue 1: France gets its first female top flight football referee, but the federation scores an own goal

As the end of the 2018-19 football season approaches, a match between Amiens and Strasbourg in France’s Ligue 1 would normally attract little attention. However, Sunday’s game has already created headlines as Stéphanie Frappart will become the first ever woman to act as a main referee in the top tier of French men’s football.

This article by Jonathan Ervine, Senior Lecturer in French and Francophone Studies, School of Languages, Literatures & Linguistics is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 25 April 2019

Teaching Fellow awarded to President of MDIS

Bangor University has awarded a prestigious Teaching Fellowship to Dr Eric Kuan, President of the Management Development Institute of Singapore (MDIS) at a special ceremony.

Publication date: 14 December 2018