Bangor Business School

Specialisations

The School specialises in the areas listed below. Visit the School research pages and School academic staff pages for further details.

Candidates seeking entry onto PhD and other research degrees are encouraged to present research proposals related to these areas of specialism.

Alternatively, candidates may undertake a research degree in a topic specified by the School. Visit the ‘Research Projects’ section for details of these topics.

Accounting and Finance with specialisations in:

  • Impression Management
  • Corporate Narrative Reporting
  • Corporate social and environmental reporting
  • Organisational Legitimacy
  • International Financial Reporting
  • Earnings quality
  • Accounting Policy choice
  • International Cross listings
  • Tax Avoidance
  • Accounting History
  • Asset Pricing
  • Monetary Policy
  • Say on Pay

Banking with specialisations in:

  • Credit risk and credit ratings
  • Market Microstructure
  • Investment Management Risk
  • Depositary Institutions
  • Appropriation of computer technology
  • Corporate Finance
  • Real Estate Finance
  • International Banking
  • Islamic Banking and Finance
  • Banking and Development
  • Financial Exclusion
  • Emerging Markets
  • European Sovereign Debt Crisis
  • Regulation

Economics with specialisations in:

  • Financial Economics
  • Development Economics
  • Game Theory
  • Political Economy
  • Behavioural Economics
  • Macroeconomic Modelling
  • Micro-econometrics
  • Public economics
  • International Trade
  • Banking Markets

Business and Management Studies with specialisations in:

  • Business History
  • Human Resource Development
  • Marketing
  • Employee Voice
  • Employment Relations
  • Employment Regulation
  • Impact of change
  • Strategic Information Systems
  • E-business
  • E-marketing
  • Data Protection
  • Communication
  • Knowledge Transfer/Management
  • Organisational Management
  • Public Administration

Research Project Opportunities

Please note the research project opportunities detailed here are NOT funded by the University. Candidates must secure their own funding to meet the costs of PhD study

Candidates wishing to research any of the projects listed in this section should apply as follows:

  • International candidates requiring a pre-sessional English course will be enrolled on a Combined English / Study Skills and Research Course at the University before starting the PhD degree. The research proposal will be developed and written when enrolled on this course.
  • UK nationals or European and International candidates who have already reached the level of English required for entry should present a relevant research proposal when applying for admission.

Alternatively candidates may present a research proposal related to the research expertise & specialisms within the School. Please refer to the 'Apply' section for further details.

Bank liquidity risk and stock returns

Supervisor: Dr Ru Xie

T: +44(0) 01248 388119/ E: r.xie@bangor.ac.uk

The current financial crisis has illustrated starkly how increased funding costs and changes in market liquidity can trigger stock market failures. According to asset pricing theory, expected stock returns are sensitive to changes in liquidity conditions. The importance of funding liquidity and market liquidity for asset pricing has been increasingly recognised in the literature. The project aims at providing further evidence about the relationship between unexpected bank illiquidity and contemporaneous excess stock returns. In particular, we will investigate the impact of bank idiosyncratic and systematic liquidity risks on excess stock returns.

Please note the research project opportunity detailed here is NOT funded by the University. Candidates must secure their own funding to meet the costs of PhD study

British Management after Thatcher

Supervisor: Prof. Bernardo Batiz-Lazo

T: +44 (0) 01248 388349/ E: b.batiz-lazo@bangor.ac.uk

Supervisor: Dr Koen P.R. Bartels

T: +44 (0) 01248 388/ E: k.bartels@bangor.ac.uk

Supervisor: Dr Tony Dobbins

T: +44(0)1248 388393 / E: a.dobbins@bangor.ac.uk

Supervisor: Dr Andrew Edwards (School of History, Welsh History and Archaeology)

T: +44(0)1248 382839 / E: a.d.edwards@bangor.ac.uk

This project aims to evaluate the impact of the Thatcher years on management thinking and practice. Margaret Thatcher is commonly cited as one of the most influential figures in modern British politics and society. However, "Thatcherism" has not only left its deep marks on the political system, the economy, and society, but has also had profound implications for the ways in which both the private and public sector are managed up to present day. This project aims to evaluate the impact of the Thatcher years on management thinking and practice. In order to get a deeper understanding of this important yet surprisingly not very systematically studied topic, the project will combine a number of methods and areas of expertise: (1) a historical analysis of media reports, policy documents, managers' (auto-)biographies, and academic literature; (2) an assessment of changes in organisational arrangements, workplace regulation, and management-employee relations; and (3) a grounded theory analysis of qualitative interviews with public and private sector managers about their daily practices.​ PhD students are invited to base their thesis on one or more of these dimensions. 

Please note the research project opportunity detailed here is NOT funded by the University. Candidates must secure their own funding to meet the costs of PhD study

Challenges of marketing in Welsh social enterprises

Supervisor: Dr Sara Parry

T: +44 (0) 1248 388457 / E: s.parry@bangor.ac.uk

Supervisor: Dr Siwan Mitchelmore

T: +44 (0) 1248 388345 / E: siwan@bangor.ac.uk

Supervisor: Dr Gareth Griffiths

T: +44 (0) 01248 388543/ E: Gareth.griffiths@bangor.ac.uk

This research focuses on the perceptions, benefits and challenges of marketing within social enterprises in Wales. There are over 3,000 organisations carrying out social enterprise activity in Wales, with a combined turnover of £2.2bn (Welsh Assembly Government, 2010) however there is a lack of research investigating Welsh social entrepreneurs and their perceptions of marketing. The research will be a two stage study incorporating semi-structured interviews with social entrepreneurs across Wales followed by a large scale survey. The aim is to achieve a holistic view of how marketing is perceived, conducted and prioritised in Welsh social enterprises.

Please note the research project opportunity detailed here is NOT funded by the University. Candidates must secure their own funding to meet the costs of PhD study

Competition, Conduct and Regulation of Retail Banking

Supervisor: Prof. John Ashton

T: +44 (0) 1248 38 8193/ E: j.ashton@bangor.ac.uk

In recent years the retail financial services industry has been associated with the creation of systemic risks, financial crisis, mis-selling and anti-competitive practices. I would welcome enquiries from prospective students wishing to undertake economic and financial studies addressing such conduct of business, competition and regulatory concerns for this industry, using both conventional and non-conventional data sets for the UK and internationally.

Please note the research project opportunity detailed here is NOT funded by the University. Candidates must secure their own funding to meet the costs of PhD study

Consumer behaviour

Supervisor: Dr Louise Hassan

T: +44 (0) 01248 383280/ E: l.hassan@bangor.ac.uk

Supervisor: Prof. Edward Shiu

T: +44 (0) 01248 382046/ E: e.shiu@bangor.ac.uk

  • The influence of multilingual packaging on consumers information processing and perceived value of the product
  • The applicability and usefulness of place attachment theory in understanding consumers' shopping behaviour regarding the local high street versus the internet
  • The maximization paradox
  • Examining factors that predict susceptibility to scams targeting vulnerable consumers

Please note the research project opportunity detailed here is NOT funded by the University. Candidates must secure their own funding to meet the costs of PhD study

Contemporary expressions of conflict at work

Supervisor: Dr Tony Dobbins

T: +44(0)1248 388393 / E: a.dobbins@bangor.ac.uk

Supervisor: Prof. Sally Sambrook

T: +44(0)1248 382046/ E: sally.sambrook@bangor.ac.uk

How is conflict in organizations expressed in different contexts? As well as traditional forms of conflict like strikes, is conflict being expressed today in new forms in different places? For example, is ‘whistleblowing’ in banks a form of conflict?

Please note the research project opportunity detailed here is NOT funded by the University. Candidates must secure their own funding to meet the costs of PhD study

Coordinating supply and demand in labour markets

Supervisor: Dr Tony Dobbins

T: +44(0)1248 388393 / E: a.dobbins@bangor.ac.uk

Supervisor: Prof. Sally Sambrook

T: +44(0)1248 382046/ E: sally.sambrook@bangor.ac.uk

What is the role of labour market institutions at multiple levels in different countries/regions in matching/coordinating or not coordinating supply (labour capability, employee training and skills) and demand (actual job opportunities)?

Please note the research project opportunity detailed here is NOT funded by the University. Candidates must secure their own funding to meet the costs of PhD study

Credit ratings

Supervisor: Prof. Owain ap Gwilym

T: +44 (0)01248 382176/ E: owain.apgwilym@bangor.ac.uk

Supervisor: Dr Rasha Alsakka

T: +44 (0)1248 383571/ E: r.alsakka@bangor.ac.uk

Supervisor: Dr Gwion Williams

T: +44 (0)1248 383959/ E: gwion.williams@bangor.ac.uk

The business school has a well-established research group on credit ratings, including several current PhD students. Members of the group have published widely in recognised international journals, especially on sovereign ratings. We welcome PhD research proposals in any area of credit rating research.

Please note the research project opportunity detailed here is NOT funded by the University. Candidates must secure their own funding to meet the costs of PhD study

Employee voice and silence at work

Supervisor: Dr Tony Dobbins

T: +44(0)1248 388393 / E: a.dobbins@bangor.ac.uk

Supervisor: Prof. Sally Sambrook

T: +44(0)1248 382046/ E: sally.sambrook@bangor.ac.uk

Employees often have ideas, information, and opinions for ways to improve work and work organizations, and employers may implement various mechanisms and institutions to facilitate expression of employee voice. Sometimes employees exercise voice and express their ideas, information, and opinions; but other times they engage in silence and withhold their ideas, information, and opinions. What are the various forms and expressions of employee voice and silence, and what conditions underpin them? Do they differ by country context?

Please note the research project opportunity detailed here is NOT funded by the University. Candidates must secure their own funding to meet the costs of PhD study

Impression management in a corporate reporting context

Supervisor: Dr Doris Merkl-Davies

T: +44 (0) 1248 382120 / E: d.m.merkl-davies@bangor.ac.uk

Impression management in a corporate reporting context is an interdisciplinary research area based on research in accounting, organisation studies, psychology, sociology, media studies, and linguistics. Impression management is concerned with organisational attempts to influence audiences’ perceptions of the organisation, its financial, social, or environmental performance, organisational changes (e.g., restructuring or reorganisation, privatisation or demutualisation, merger or acquisition, etc.), organisational crises or public controversies (e.g., tax avoidance, product failure, accident, etc.), or idea (e.g., shareholder value, corporate citizenship, sustainable development, etc.). It entails the use of corporate narrative documents (e.g., annual reports, CSR reports, press releases, etc.) usually by enhancing desirable aspects of the organisation or by obfuscating less desirable aspects. If corporate communication is used for impression management purposes, it may result in unwarranted support of organisations and their activities by shareholders (capital misallocations), stakeholders, or by society at large. Research thus involves the analysis of corporate narrative documents for evidence of impression management and of audience responses to impression management (e.g., share price reactions, analyst recommendations, NGO responses, newspaper articles).

Please note the research project opportunity detailed here is NOT funded by the University. Candidates must secure their own funding to meet the costs of PhD study

Managerial failure, voting and executive remuneration

Supervisor: Prof. Lynn Hodgkinson

T: +44 (0) 1248 382165 / E: abse09@bangor.ac.uk

Although there is some evidence that a non-binding vote doesn’t prevent less desirable remuneration packages being put in place, dissent may have moderated future packages. The UK government introduced an advisory vote on executive remuneration in 2002 enabling shareholders to register dissent. This legislation was amended in 2013 to enable shareholders to have a binding vote on companies’ remuneration policies at least every three years. According to Vince Cable the legislation was amended to improve the clarity of pay reports and pay-performance sensitivity.   Gregory-Smith and Main (2013) suggest, however, that the binding vote could have a negative impact on pay-performance sensitivity as large dissent votes will require management to act and potentially disrupt the value-creating activity of the firm. The project will examine whether the binding vote impacts on firms’ value creating activities and pay- performance sensitivities.

 

Please note the research project opportunity detailed here is NOT funded by the University. Candidates must secure their own funding to meet the costs of PhD study

Market microstructure

Supervisor: Prof. Owain ap Gwilym

T: +44 (0) 01248 382176/ E: owain.apgwilym@bangor.ac.uk

I am interested in receiving PhD proposals in any area of market microstructure or the analysis of high frequency financial market data.

Please note the research project opportunity detailed here is NOT funded by the University. Candidates must secure their own funding to meet the costs of PhD study

Open innovation, entrepreneurship and strategy performance in SMEs

Supervisor: Dr Azhdar Karami

T: +44(0)1248 388350 / E: a.karami@bangor.ac.uk

Supervisor: Prof. Kostas Nikolopoulos

T: +44(0)1248 383796 / E: kostas@bangor.ac.uk

The adoption of International Financial Reporting Standard (IFRS) provides an interesting setting in assessing the impact of the financial reporting regime on both earnings quality and disclosure quality. Information asymmetry between firm managers and outside shareholders generates a demand for increased information disclosure and provides an incentive for firms to disclose, because the value of incremental information is greater in this environment. Similarly, firms with poor earnings quality provide more comprehensive disclosure, because the degree of information asymmetry between the firm and investors is higher in such firms. On the contrary, theoretical models show that, firms have incentives to disclose less information, as earnings quality decreases. That is, firms with poor earnings quality disclose less information because investors treat the disclosure of such firms as less credible.

Please note the research project opportunity detailed here is NOT funded by the University. Candidates must secure their own funding to meet the costs of PhD study

Political Economy and Financial Instability

Supervisor: Dr. Rasha Alsakka

T: +44(0)1248 383571/ E: r.alsakka@bangor.ac.uk

Supervisor: Dr. Noemi Mantovan

T: +44(0) 124838 8081/ E: n.mantovan@bangor.ac.uk

The recent financial crisis in developing economies has lifted the veil on the links between the stability of financial markets and political preferences. Financial instability has a strong effect on economies, both from an individual and from an institutional point of view. Citizens expect governments to respond to declining economies, high levels of credit risk and struggling financial markets. Governments look for ways to better manage the economic and financial factors to foster stability, however politicians become more aware of social pressures, and they may tend to delay adjustments and reforms that may be seen as austere and undesirable in the eyes of their citizens. We would welcome PhD proposals aimed at analyzing the effects of credit risk and financial uncertainty on the happiness of citizens and the extremization of political preferences, the role of political dynamics in explaining financial crises and instability, and the reaction of financial markets to major political events and reforms.

Please note the research project opportunity detailed here is NOT funded by the University. Candidates must secure their own funding to meet the costs of PhD study

Risk in the employment relationship, non-standard employment and the 'flexible firm'

Supervisor: Dr Tony Dobbins

T: +44(0)1248 388393 / E: a.dobbins@bangor.ac.uk

Supervisor: Prof. Sally Sambrook

T: +44(0)1248 382046/ E: sally.sambrook@bangor.ac.uk

Examine the concept of the ‘flexible firm’ (split between core and periphery workers) and the distribution of risk in modern employment relationships in different country contexts. Who benefits most from flexible working practices like ‘zero hours contracts’? In the years since the initial debate about the ‘flexible firm model’ (Atkinson, 1986; Pollert, 1991), atypical and non-standard employment (NSE) has seemingly become an increasingly ‘standard’ organizational practice and experience for many workers worldwide. For example, flexible zero hours contracts have become common in many UK workplaces. One issue of contemporary debate is the extent to which NSE benefits employers and workers, and how risk is distributed. The dynamics and consequences of NSE against a backdrop of the changing world of work is an important research issue for work and employment relations scholars (Kalleberg, 2009).

Please note the research project opportunity detailed here is NOT funded by the University. Candidates must secure their own funding to meet the costs of PhD study

Say on Pay

Supervisor: Prof. Lynn Hodgkinson

T: +44 (0) 1248 382165 / E: abse09@bangor.ac.uk

Supervisor: Dr. Gwion Williams

T: +44 (0) 1248 383959 / E: gwion.williams@bangor.ac.uk

Supervisor: Mr. Danial Hemmings

T: +44 (0) 1248 388162 / E: d.hemmings@bangor.ac.uk

The culture for large executive bonus packages poses questions over whether shareholders are getting value for money. In principle, ‘Say on Pay’ legislation provides an opportunity for shareholders to vote on whether they agree with a firm’s executive remuneration policies and outcomes. Although there is some evidence that a non-binding vote doesn’t prevent excessive remuneration packages being put in place, dissent may have moderated future remuneration policies. The UK government introduced an advisory vote on executive remuneration in 2002 enabling shareholders to register dissent. This legislation was amended in 2013 by the Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Act 2013.

The new regime has two main components:

  • A directors’ remuneration policy, subject to a binding shareholder vote at least every three years.
  • An expanded annual report on remuneration, subject to an annual advisory vote of shareholders.

This topical area of research questions whether and why this legislation is effective, or not.

Please note the research project opportunity detailed here is NOT funded by the University. Candidates must secure their own funding to meet the costs of PhD study

Social Marketing from a consumer perspective

Supervisor: Dr Louise Hassan

T: +44 (0) 01248 383280/ E: l.hassan@bangor.ac.uk

Supervisor: Prof. Edward Shiu

T: +44 (0) 01248 382046/ E: e.shiu@bangor.ac.uk

  • Understanding the role played by brand-stretching in promoting an image of smoking
  • The influence of e-cigarette advertising on smoking behaviour

Please note the research project opportunity detailed here is NOT funded by the University. Candidates must secure their own funding to meet the costs of PhD study

Tax Havens and Tax Avoidance: International Evidence

Supervisor: Prof. John Thornton

T: +44 (0) 1248 388545/ E: j.thornton@bangor.ac.uk

Supervisor: Dr Aziz Jaafar

T: +44 (0) 1248 383226 / E: a.jaafar@bangor.ac.uk

The use of tax havens as a tax avoidance mechanism has come under increasing scrutiny from regulatory authorities and policymakers, especially in the context of the fiscal crisis that has afflicted many countries in recent years. The use of tax havens among multinationals is ubiquitous. For example, all but two of the 100 largest U.K. firms had affiliates in tax-haven jurisdictions, and 83 of the 100 largest publicly listed U.S. firms reported having subsidiaries in jurisdictions listed as tax havens or financial privacy jurisdictions. The European Commission estimates that around one trillion Euros is lost annually across the European Union member states mainly as a result of the exploitation of tax havens. This research project is aimed at assessing the propensity for a firm to use a tax haven, and whether this is different across public and private firms.

Please note the research project opportunity detailed here is NOT funded by the University. Candidates must secure their own funding to meet the costs of PhD study

Tax implications of transfer pricing

Supervisor: Dr Helen Rogers

T: +44 (0) 1248 382171 / E: h.rogers@bangor.ac.uk

Transfer pricing is the pricing of goods, intangibles or services that are transferred between related parties. There is scope for setting these in order to minimise tax and, over time, the phrase “transfer pricing” has increasingly been used as synonymous with “tax avoidance.” In order to counter tax avoidance, different countries have different tax rules, most of which are based on the arm’s length principle. This principle is set out in the OECD Guidelines on Transfer Pricing, but is vague and can be interpreted differently by different people in different contexts, giving rise to uncertainty as to whether the rules have been complied with.

Dr Helen Rogers is interested in supervising PhD research that considers transfer pricing from a tax perspective and this might include considering the different impact on a company’s tax accounting and management accounting if there is a change in transfer pricing policy. Research might also explore transfer pricing uncertainty and consider ways in which it can be reduced; this could include consideration of the recent OECD consultation on BEPS-related transfer pricing issues or a focus on some of the ways in which individual companies might seek to reduce uncertainty by negotiating with the relevant tax authorities.

Please note the research project opportunity detailed here is NOT funded by the University. Candidates must secure their own funding to meet the costs of PhD study

The impact of employment regulations

Supervisor: Dr Tony Dobbins

T: +44(0)1248 388393 / E: a.dobbins@bangor.ac.uk

Supervisor: Prof. Sally Sambrook

T: +44(0)1248 382046/ E: sally.sambrook@bangor.ac.uk

What is the impact of employment regulations like national minimum wage laws, worker participation/rights laws, and so forth, in different countries?

Please note the research project opportunity detailed here is NOT funded by the University. Candidates must secure their own funding to meet the costs of PhD study

The Impact of IFRS adoption on earnings quality and disclosure quality

Supervisor: Dr Aziz Jaafar

T: +44 (0) 1248 383226 / E: a.jaafar@bangor.ac.uk

The adoption of International Financial Reporting Standard (IFRS) provides an interesting setting in assessing the impact of the financial reporting regime on both earnings quality and disclosure quality. Information asymmetry between firm managers and outside shareholders generates a demand for increased information disclosure and provides an incentive for firms to disclose, because the value of incremental information is greater in this environment. Similarly, firms with poor earnings quality provide more comprehensive disclosure, because the degree of information asymmetry between the firm and investors is higher in such firms. On the contrary, theoretical models show that, firms have incentives to disclose less information, as earnings quality decreases. That is, firms with poor earnings quality disclose less information because investors treat the disclosure of such firms as less credible.

Please note the research project opportunity detailed here is NOT funded by the University. Candidates must secure their own funding to meet the costs of PhD study

The implementation of dynamic structural estimation in international finance

Supervisor: Dr Noemi Mantovan

T: +44(0)1248 388350/ E: n.mantovan@bangor.ac.uk

Supervisor: Dr Rasha Alsakka

T: +44(0)1248 383571/ E: r.alsakka@bangor.ac.uk

Recent research in leading finance and economics journals has developed a theoretical framework to study the behaviour of financial and investment institutions in international financial markets. New challenges lie in moving from simulating models to estimation. We are interested in supervising PhD projects that that bridge between theory and estimation applications, by developing a dynamic structural estimation that can be directly applied to the mathematical modelling of financial institutions’ performance.

Please note the research project opportunity detailed here is NOT funded by the University. Candidates must secure their own funding to meet the costs of PhD study

The New Shape of Banking: Implications

Supervisor: Prof. Santiago Carbo-Valverde

T: +44(0)1248 388852 / E: s.carbo-valverde@bangor.ac.uk

Banking is a challenged industry. There are new competitors that will likely reduce the importance of the banking industry in the financial flows of an economy. Shadow banking has various competitive, regulatory and risk implications. Areas of interest in this context are: the future of securitization; the implications of low interest rates for banking business; the future of regulation European Banking Union issues; credit markets, retail payments.

Please note the research project opportunity detailed here is NOT funded by the University. Candidates must secure their own funding to meet the costs of PhD study

Transforming the Welfare State: Innovative Practices of Harnessing Urban Problems of Multiple Deprivation

Supervisor: Dr Koen P.R. Bartels

T: +44 (0) 01248 388/ E: k.bartels@bangor.ac.uk

Western governments are currently attempting to further transform their welfare states in a harsh global political-economy. Based on a neo-liberal discourse, pressures and possibilities for social and democratic innovation are being increased, while not necessarily helping to overcome the shadow of hierarchy that stifles service delivery, problems solving, and innovation. The aim of this project is to investigate how innovative practices can engender effective, legitimate, and sustainable social and democratic reforms of urban governance. More specifically, the project will engage with local politicians, managers, public professionals, and citizens who are trying to resolve intricate problems in a British deprived neighbourhood and the local organisational system. Making use of sophisticated interpretive and qualitative methods, including ethnography and action research, the PhD student will be actively involved in improving understandings of what renders local innovative practices successful as well as how these can be improved.

Please note the research project opportunity detailed here is NOT funded by the University. Candidates must secure their own funding to meet the costs of PhD study

Entry requirements

For information and further detailed guidance on entry requirements for International Students, including the minimum English Language entry requirement, please visit the Entry Requirements by Country pages on the International Education Centre section of our website.

Ask the IEC for assistance...

If you want advice or a general chat about what’s available contact the International Education Centre on +44 (0) 1248 382028 or email international@bangor.ac.uk

Fees & Scholarships

Please take a look at our Fees & Scholarships pages for details.

How to apply

Step 1 – Select your research topic

You have three options with regards the selection of your research topic;

Option 1

Prepare your Research Proposal, based on the research expertise at the School.

Option 2

Select a research project from the Directory for PhD opportunities (Also available as a PDF document). Enter the name of the project and the name of the supervisor on the application form. The ‘Research Project’ route is delivered in two parts:

  • Part 1: A Combined English / Study Skills and Research Proposal course. This is when you will write a research proposal based on the selected research project. Duration is up to 1 year, dependent on the English language level.
  • Part 2: The PhD programme.

Option 3

Occasionally, the University advertises PhD Studentships. Studentships are funded / sponsored PhD placements which cover tuition fees and sometimes living costs, usually for a period of 3 years. They are offered for specific research projects. Studentships are advertised on the University website and Academic Schools’ websites and there is normally a deadline for submitting applications. The terms and conditions of Studentships vary and may become available at different times of the year.

If you are applying for a Studentship, enter the name of the studentship on the application form

Step 2 – Prepare your documentation

You will need to gather the following documentation to present with your application:

  • Bachelor degree certificate and transcript
  • Masters degree certificate and transcript (if undertaken)
  • English language test certificate (if undertaken)
  • Academic reference / support letter
  • Confirmation of funding / sponsorship (if applicable)
  • Passport
  • Research Proposal (if you are NOT selecting a project from the Directory of PhD opportunities or applying for a Studentship). Click here for guidance about how to write a good research proposal.

Step 3 – Apply Online

International students have two options when applying;

Apply online

Option 1 – Apply online yourself

Option 2 – Apply online with the help of a recruitment agent

  • If you would like help in completing and managing your application you may seek help from one of our authorised representatives or agents. To see a list of our representatives for your country please visit the Country pages.

Application advice

Applications for research degrees differ substantially from applications for taught courses such as Masters degrees. Although the application form is the same, the way in which you approach your application can make all the difference.

Applying for a self-funded or externally-funded Research Degree

As with all of our courses, you can apply to fund yourself through a PhD/MPhil at Bangor, or you may already have sourced external funding (e.g. from your employer or government), and we warmly welcome all expressions of interest in so doing. However, rather than simply filling in an application form, there are a few steps that you can take in order that your application stands a greater chance of being successful.

All PhD/MPhil students require supervision from at least one academic member of staff at the University, and if you are considering a PhD/MPhil, you will already have a good idea of the specific area or theme that you want to research. In order to ascertain that we hold sufficient expertise in your chosen topic to provide supervision, you should first look at our staff pages. This will provide you with a breakdown of each staff member’s area of academic focus.

Once you have found a member of staff whose research interests broadly accord with your own, you should contact them directly with a concise research ‘brief’ that outlines your proposal and ask whether s/he would consider supervising your project. If the academic expresses his/her interest, you may then further discuss your ideas and develop a full PhD/MPhil research proposal.

At this stage, you should formally apply online for the PhD/MPhil programme. You should fill the form out thoroughly, including academic references, your research proposal and the name of the academic member of staff under whose supervision you intend the research to be conducted.

Your research proposal

A good research proposal is essential if you are applying for a PhD or MPhil. The proposal should include:

  1. Overview – give a brief abstract of the subject area you wish to research and include information on the key theoretical, policy or empirical debates that will be addressed.
  2. Planning – you need to demonstrate that you are aware of the research timescales and have a plan in place to conduct your work. You need to demonstrate that the research is manageable in the given time period.
  3. Literature references – you need to show that your planned area of research has not been studied before. Provide references to key articles and texts relevant to your area of study.
  4. Methodology – you need to show that you are aware of the methodological tools available and have identified which ones would be suitable for your research.

When do I Apply?

You can apply at any time of the year.

It is possible to start a PhD degree at any point in the year at most academic Schools, subject to agreement with the supervisor.

We advise that you submit your application in enough time to:

  • organise funding
  • undertake an English course
  • obtain documents such as transcripts and references required for meeting the conditions of the offer
  • apply for a visa
  • make accommodation arrangements

Further information

Admission related queries

If you need any assitance in completing your application, contact the International Admissions Team on +44 (0) 1248 382028 or email international@bangor.ac.uk