Module MSE-2015:
Haematology & Transfusion

Module Facts

Run by School of Medical Sciences

10 Credits or 5 ECTS Credits

Semester 1

Organiser: Dr Dylan Jones

Overall aims and purpose

The aim of this module is to introduce students to the morphology and physiology of blood and its constituents and the study of blood coagulation. It will also include the laboratory investigations and techniques used for the routine diagnosis of blood samples and the identification and compatibility of blood groups. The knowledge of normal blood and its constituents plus an appreciation of the basis of blood transfusion and cross-matching delivered in this module will provide the pre-requisite understanding of normal haematology. This will enable the student to progress to study abnormal haematological conditions included in the Year 3 module.

This module is available to International exchange students of The College of Health and Behavioural Sciences

Please note: This module is a core component of the School of Medical Sciences accredited Biomedical Sciences degree programs. As such students without appropriate pre-requisite background knowledge and understanding of human molecular and cellular biology may find the module content and assessments, challenging.

To enhance learning and understanding, lectures, tutorials and practical demonstrations are recorded using the Panopto system where available.

Course content

The module will cover several key concepts of haematological science:

  • Red cell development and their role in human health.
  • The biology of white blood cells and their role in health.
  • The role of the haemostatic system in maintaining health.
  • Key concepts of blood transfusion.

Lectures and revision sessions will present detailed information and discussion on key issues relating to clinical haematology. Links to cutting edge developments and research will be highlighted and a reflection on how clinical and diagnostic patterns have changed over time. The module will contain lectures on the following topics:

  • Basic concepts in haematology.
  • Introduction to anaemia.
  • Macrocytic and megaloblastic anaemia.
  • The metabolism of red cells and inherited defects of red cell metabolism.
  • Role of white blood cells in health and non-malignant disease.
  • Blood-borne parasites.
  • Introduction to haemostasis.
  • Bleeding disorders and thrombophilia.
  • Introduction to blood transfusion.

Practical: The practical session will provide hands on experience with assessing blood film morphologies in order to diagnose patient case studies.

Assessment Criteria

threshold

Category D (40%-49%):

A threshold student should have a basic knowledge of the essential facts and key concepts in haematology and blood transfusion presented in this module. Written answers should demonstrate an ability to organise relevant lecture material into a coherent argument. The answer may contain errors and knowledge gaps.

good

Category B (60%-69%):

A good student should have a thorough factual knowledge across all aspects of the module, and be able to detail examples where appropriate. Written answers should demonstrate an ability to critically synthesise lecture material. Limited evidence of background reading.

C- to C+

Category C (50%-59%):

A C Category student should have a correct knowledge of the essential facts and key concepts in haematology and blood transfusion presented in this module. Written answers should demonstrate an ability to organise relevant lecture material into a coherent argument. The answer may lack context and explanation.

excellent

Category A (70%-100%):

Completed assessments present very accurate and relevant material, integrated with numerous directed outside core text-reading and some self-researched information sources. Essays, answers and reports present very coherent and well organised arguments that demonstrate excellent overall knowledge and understanding of all module material.

Evidence of wider reading & critical thinking is required for A+ and A* marks.

Learning outcomes

  1. Explain the theory and practical aspects of bloood transfusion and cross matching

  2. Describe the principles of the most frequently used pathoology laboratory tests used in haematology and their diagnostic significance

  3. Demonstrate an understanding of blood and its constituents

Assessment Methods

Type Name Description Weight
COURSEWORK Laboratory practical

The aim of the practical is to provide you with experience in examining blood films and to draw correct conclusions based upon morphological observations and interpretation of clinical details as well as carrying out a 5-part differential.

One word processed practical report of 2,000 words (+/- 10%) (excluding bibliography, legends and footnotes). A word count must be included at the beginning of the report. Turnitin submission only, no hard copy required. In-text citations and bibliography must be in Harvard style.

Introduction (400 words): Information should be given on the necessary background to the practical and its aims and objectives. Explain the purpose of the investigation, details of the analyte / test, how the test is used and interpreted in a clinical laboratory and changes in disease. A table can sometimes be used to good effect in the introduction to highlight some of this information (see results section).

Results: Reproduce the tables you complete during this practical in the report. Tables should be numbered and have clear titles and informative figure legends that provides the reader with a synthesis of the results demonstrated.

Discussion (1600 words): Discussion is defined as “to examine by argument” and it should consist of an examination of your case (supported by your results) in relation to the objectives of the practical. Highlight which of your results are most significant, point out any deficiencies of inconsistencies. It is easier for a reader to find inconsistency in results, so you should be aware of simple self-honesty with your results. It may be best to split your discussion into mini-case studies i.e. Patient A, B, C and M (~400 words per patient).

40
EXAM End of module exam

Students will sit a 1 hour exam consisting of 45 eMCQ style questions covering all topics discussed in the lectures. Each lecture will contribute 5 eMCQ questions to the final exam.

60

Teaching and Learning Strategy

Hours
Lecture

9x 2h Interactive in-class lectures

18
Tutorial

1x2h Tutorial for formative mid module test with Q & A session. 1x2h Revision for end of module exam with Q & A session.

4
Private study

Directed and self directed reading around the topic. Writing practical report. Revision for mid-module test and end of module exam.

75
Practical classes and workshops

3 hour practical session with aspects of rourine diagnostic blood testing.

3

Transferable skills

  • Literacy - Proficiency in reading and writing through a variety of media
  • Numeracy - Proficiency in using numbers at appropriate levels of accuracy
  • Self-Management - Able to work unsupervised in an efficient, punctual and structured manner. To examine the outcomes of tasks and events, and judge levels of quality and importance
  • Exploring - Able to investigate, research and consider alternatives
  • Information retrieval - Able to access different and multiple sources of information
  • Inter-personal - Able to question, actively listen, examine given answers and interact sensitevely with others
  • Critical analysis & Problem Solving - Able to deconstruct and analyse problems or complex situations. To find solutions to problems through analyses and exploration of all possibilities using appropriate methods, rescources and creativity.
  • Presentation - Able to clearly present information and explanations to an audience. Through the written or oral mode of communication accurately and concisely.
  • Teamwork - Able to constructively cooperate with others on a common task, and/or be part of a day-to-day working team
  • Argument - Able to put forward, debate and justify an opinion or a course of action, with an individual or in a wider group setting
  • Self-awareness & Reflectivity - Having an awareness of your own strengths, weaknesses, aims and objectives. Able to regularly review, evaluate and reflect upon the performance of yourself and others

Subject specific skills

Biomedical Science benchmarks:

The programme aims to give students a comprehension of scientific investigation of blood sciences. (benchmarks: 5.1; 5.3; 5.5)

On successful completion of the course, students will be able to engage with essential facts, major concepts, principles and theories associated with blood sciences, and understand the biological mechanisms underlying human pathological conditions and the basis of the analytical techniques used to diagnose and monitor these conditions. (benchmark: 6.4)

Biomedical Science benchmarks:

The programme aims to give students a comprehension of scientific investigation of Clinical Biochemistry. (benchmarks: 5.1; 5.3; 5.5)

On successful completion of the course, students will be able to engage with essential facts, major concepts, principles and theories associated with clinical biochemistry, and understand the biological mechanisms underlying human pathological conditions and the basis of the analytical techniques used to diagnose and monitor these conditions. (benchmark: 6.4)

Be able to undertake practical investigations in a responsible, safe and ethical manner while paying attention to risk assessment, relevant health and safety regulations, ethical issues, procedures for obtaining ethical permission and informed consent and issues relating to patient welfare. (benchmark: 4.3)

Graduates will be able to apply their knowledge to a professional, evidence-based approach to research into the pathogenesis and origins of disease processes. (benchmark: 6.2)

Biomedical science graduates are aware of the current laboratory methods to investigate and diagnose human diseases in clinical and research environments. This includes an appreciation of research and the development of new technologies. (benchmark: 6.3)

Biomedical sciences graduates should recognise and apply subject-specific theories, paradigms, concepts or principles to reach evidence-based decisions. (benchmark: 4.2)

To be able to receive and respond to a variety of sources of information (textual, numerical, verbal, graphical), carry out sample selection, produce record scientific records & analyse data within a statistical context (an understanding of statistical significance and statistical power), and to communicate the outcomes to a variety of audiences using a range of formats, media and approaches including the avoidance of plagiarism. (benchmark: 4.4; 4.5)

Graduates should develop the skills necessary for self-managed and lifelong learning, have an appreciation for the role and impact of intellectual property, and identify and work towards targets for personal, academic, professional and career development. (benchmark: 4.7)

Graduates will be able to apply their knowledge to a professional, evidence-based approach to research into the pathogenesis and origins of disease processes. (benchmark: 6.2)

Biomedical science graduates are aware of the current laboratory methods to investigate and diagnose human diseases in clinical and research environments. This includes an appreciation of research and the development of new technologies. (benchmark: 6.3)

Biomedical sciences graduates should recognise and apply subject-specific theories, paradigms, concepts or principles to reach evidence-based decisions. (benchmark: 4.2)

To be able to receive and respond to a variety of sources of information (textual, numerical, verbal, graphical), carry out sample selection, produce record scientific records & analyse data within a statistical context (an understanding of statistical significance and statistical power), and to communicate the outcomes to a variety of audiences using a range of formats, media and approaches including the avoidance of plagiarism. (benchmark: 4.4; 4.5)

Graduates should develop the skills necessary for self-managed and lifelong learning, have an appreciation for the role and impact of intellectual property, and identify and work towards targets for personal, academic, professional and career development. (benchmark: 4.7)

Resources

Pre- and Co-requisite Modules