All News A–Z

13/03/15 - BBC Wales Today – Dr Andrew Davies, School of Ocean Sciences discussing marine plastics and wildlife.

Watch Dr Andrew Davies being interviewed on BBC Wales Today: 

View the clip here. 

Publication date: 20 March 2015

£1.7m National Lottery grant to protect UK’s threatened marine life

The Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) has awarded £1.7million to “Capturing our Coast”, a project designed to explore how the marine environment is responding to global climate change.

The project will train over 3,000 volunteers – making it the largest experimental marine citizen science project ever undertaken in the UK.  The volunteers will collect data around key species and it is hoped the new research will help inform future policy and conservation strategies.

Publication date: 15 June 2015

£1.85m study to investigate microbes “hitch-hiking” on marine plastics

Experts at Bangor University are working with the Universities of Stirling and Warwick on a new £1.85 million project investigating how marine plastics transport bacteria and viruses – and the impact that may have on human health.

The scientists are aiming to understand how plastics act as vehicles, with the potential to spread pathogens within coastal zones, or even from country to country, and how that affects health.

Publication date: 13 December 2018

£1m EU boost for Marine Centre Wales

Bangor University Vice-Chancellor John G Hughes has welcomed the news that the £23.6m SEACAMS project, which it leads, has been given a £1m EU boost.

SEACAMS is an EU scheme pioneering collaborative research projects in marine science between business and universities delivered by Bangor University in partnership with Aberystwyth and Swansea Universities. The project is helping to develop the coastal marine economy in Wales and has already worked with more than 60 companies on R&D projects ranging from developing new products to studying marine life to determining management strategies for rising sea levels.

Publication date: 26 June 2014

£30 million investment in Combined Food and Power facilities in Wales announced.

Orthios Eco Parks Limited and Bangor University have today announced the agreement to work towards the creation of a Combined Food and Power (CFP) Centre of Excellence.

Publication date: 23 October 2015

£4.9 million pounds to train new generation of environmental scientists

Bangor University is poised to train a new generation of environmental scientists equipped to tackle the challenges of a planet under pressure, under a £4.9 million initiative which has been funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC).

Publication date: 6 November 2013

£7m research programme into water, food and energy provision

The first five research projects to be funded through the Welsh Governments’ £7m Sêr Cymru National Research Network for Low Carbon, Energy and Environment are announced in Cardiff today (Thursday 26 March).

Publication date: 25 March 2015

A 400-year-old shark is the latest animal discovery to reveal the secrets of long life

With an estimated lifespan of 400 years, the Greenland shark has just been reported to be the longest-lived vertebrate on the planet. This is only the latest of a series of recent findings that push the boundaries of animal longevity, and it raises the perennial question of what factors enable some animals to achieve what we might call extreme longevity – lifespans that can be measured in centuries.

Publication date: 12 August 2016

Academics elected as Fellows of the Learned Society of Wales.

Two Bangor University academics elected as Fellows of the Learned Society of Wales.

The Learned Society of Wales announced the results of its 2014 Election of new Fellows this week.  Of the forty three new Fellows, two were from Bangor University – Professor James Scourse from the School of Ocean Sciences and Professor Nigel John from the School of Computer Science. 

Publication date: 16 April 2014

Access All Areas at the 2015 Hidden Worlds exhibition

‘Hidden worlds’  the flagship event at Bangor University’s Science Festival, which runs 13-22 March 2015, is offering even more hands on activities and demonstrations in this the Festival’s fifth year.

Publication date: 11 March 2015

Aircraft debris looks like it's from MH370 – now can we find the rest?

Mattias Greenof the School of Ocean Sciences writing in The Conversation. Read the original article.

It appears that the debris washed ashore on Reunion, an island east of Madagascar, may be from the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 which disappeared in March 2014, believed lost at sea somewhere to the west of Australia.

Reunion lies 500km east of Madagascar near the island of Mauritius, around 4,000km from the area (marked in red) where search efforts for the missing aircraft have been concentrated. That’s a huge distance to travel, even in the 500 or so days it has been since the crash. Is this possible from an oceanographic perspective?

Publication date: 30 July 2015

As sea ice retreats, will wind stir up Atlantic water heat in the Arctic Ocean?

The Arctic region is warming up at twice the rate as the rest of the planet, and the most obvious symptom of this warming is the retreat of the sea ice that covers the Arctic Ocean.

Publication date: 19 September 2016

At Royal Command

Two Bangor University academics have  recently received royal invitations to take part in important and influential events.

Publication date: 3 June 2016

Autumnwatch viewers to learn about the Sea Trout

Autumnwatch viewers across the UK will learn about a project that’s hoping to improve  the situation for the sewin or sea trout, on the programme to be broadcast on Thursday 18 November (BBC 2 21.30pm 18.11.10).

Publication date: 17 November 2010

Bangor Academic remains European Champion Rafter

A Bangor University academic has recently represented Great Britain at the European White Water Rafting Championships 2016 in Tacen, Slovenia.

Publication date: 27 May 2016

Bangor at the Ynys Môn National Eisteddfod

As the major provider of Welsh medium higher education, Bangor University is particularly active again in this year’s National Eisteddfod in Anglesey.

Full details and news about the University’s activities at the Eisteddfod is available on the University’s website at: www.bangor.ac.uk/eisteddfod

Publication date: 2 August 2017

Bangor graduate Awarded World Prize for Work on Marine Biodiversity

Elizabeth Taylor Jay, who gained an MSc Marine Environmental Protection in 1997/98 after studying at Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences, received the World Award for the Best Action on Biological Diversity 2010, during the UN Summit on the Convention of Biological Diversity, held in Nagoya, Japan last week.

Publication date: 2 November 2010

Bangor graduates make a difference on World Challenge project

Two Bangor graduates are working on an environmental project in Madagascar, shortlisted for the World Challenge, a global competition aimed at finding projects or small businesses from around the world that have shown enterprise and innovation at a grassroots level.

Publication date: 9 November 2010

Bangor in the Indian Ocean

Marine biologists from Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences have recently returned from a science and conservation expedition to the British Indian Ocean Territory, currently the world’s largest Marine Reserve, located 7° south of the equator, below the Maldives.   

Publication date: 2 June 2015

Bangor PhD Student receives award at the 6th World Fisheries Congress

Gwladys Lambert, who recently completed her PhD in the School of Ocean Sciences at Bangor University, was awarded joint second best oral presentation at the 6th World Fisheries Congress held in Edinburgh 7-11th May.

Publication date: 16 May 2012

Bangor Physical Oceanographers score a million pound hat-trick!

Physical Oceanographers from Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences have recently won three research grants from the Natural Environment Research Council, one of the bodies which funds UK research. Together, the research grants bring a million pounds’ worth of new research to be conducted by the University.

Publication date: 19 July 2011

Bangor Physicist among world experts discussing climatic effect of disappearing Arctic sea ice

Bangor University Ocean Physicist Prof Tom Rippeth is one of 12 international scientists to be invited to speak at a workshop organised by the International Arctic Science Committee to discuss the future impact of the complete disappearance of Arctic Sea Ice cover in the summer.

Publication date: 13 October 2014

Bangor Professor appointed to UK Research Council’s Science Board

Professor David Thomas, Head of the School of Ocean Sciences at Bangor University, has been appointed to the Science Board of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), the UK's largest funder of independent environmental science, training and innovation, delivered through universities and research centres.

Publication date: 27 October 2016

Bangor Scientists in the Indian Ocean

Scientists from the School of Ocean Scientists are part of a 14 person expedition currently on a ship in the British Indian Ocean Territory (BIOT) studying the biodiversity of the World’s largest Marine Protected Area.

Publication date: 7 April 2014

Bangor scientist to help protect Marine Biodiversity in the Caribbean

The School of Ocean Sciences collaborating with the Government of the Cayman Islands and US partner The Nature Conservancy have launched an £817,000 project to protect the marine biodiversity of the Cayman Islands, a UK Overseas Territory in the central Caribbean. 

Publication date: 28 October 2010

Bangor Scientist to Strengthen the World’s Largest Marine Reserve

Expertise from Bangor University’s world renowned School of Ocean Science is to contribute towards monitoring and surveying the world’s largest marine reserve, which surrounds a string of tiny islands in the British Indian Ocean Territory of the Chagos Archipelago.

Publication date: 7 March 2012

Bangor’s elite athletes awarded Sports Scholarships

Every year, Bangor University supports students with sporting ability by offering a number of Sports Scholarships for students studying for a degree in any subject area. These Sports Scholarships are awarded to recognise and support sporting excellence and achievement. They are aimed at helping talented and high performance students to combine their academic study and sporting performance to assist them in achieving their full potential.

Publication date: 13 January 2015

Bangor Student Finalists in Climate Week Awards 2013

Andy O’Callaghan, a second year Marine Science/ Zoology student at Bangor University has been names a finalist in the upcoming Climate Week Awards 2013.

Publication date: 4 March 2013

Bangor University Alumnus launches Wildlife Tourism Company

A Bangor University alumnus has recently launched a website that provides information about Britain’s wildlife to offer activities that let customers find their favourite animals in the wild.

Publication date: 4 December 2017

Bangor University assists Isle of Man government to understand economically vital fisheries

Work that is leading to a better understanding of important sea fisheries off the Isle of Man is set to continue following the re-appointment of Bangor University as external scientific adviser to the Government’s Department of Environment Food and Agriculture (DEFA).

Publication date: 23 June 2015

Bangor University brings significant European research funding to north Wales

Research funding worth nearing £10 million has been levied by Bangor University researchers from the European Union research funding programme, and the University expects to improve on this results in the new European research and innovation programme.

Forty-two major pan-European research projects led by Bangor University academics were successfully funded, against stiff competition in FP7, the 7th Research Framework Programme of the European Commission, which ran from 2007 to 2013.

Publication date: 10 December 2014

Bangor University explains why there are two tides to Coast viewers

Dr Tom Rippeth of Bangor University’s renowned School of Ocean Sciences takes part in the new series of the highly popular Coast series on BBC 2 at Sunday 10th June at 9pm, on BBC2.

Publication date: 8 June 2012

Bangor University graduate spends time reporting on Chile’s fisheries management

Andrew Frederick Johnson, 29, graduated with a PhD in Marine Fish Ecology from the School of Ocean Sciences  this year.  He then went on to win a Vodafone World of Difference Scholarship to work on acoustics of whales and dolphins, before he was funded by the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust to travel to Chile for two months to report on their fisheries management scheme.

Publication date: 19 December 2013

Bangor University hosts its first Polar Symposium

A ‘Polar Symposium’ being held this week-end (Saturday 8 December) is the first of its kind to be held at Bangor University.

The 'Bangor Polar Symposium' at the School of Ocean Sciences has been jointly organized by the UK Polar Network and the Endeavour Society, a Bangor University student society focussing on ocean sciences.

Publication date: 7 December 2012

Bangor University leading the world of marine renewable energy research

Dr Simon Neill of the School of Ocean Sciences was primary chair of a series of marine renewable energy sessions at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Ocean Sciences Meeting in New Orleans last week – the world’s largest ocean science event.

Publication date: 1 March 2016

Bangor University Peer Support Volunteer of the Year 2015 Awarded

When mention was made that the Peer Guide to receive the Peer Support Volunteer of the Years 2015 had texted her students to see if they were making progress with accommodation arrangements for next year, student Hannah Lee began to suspect that her name was about to be called out to receive Bangor University’s annual Award.

Publication date: 12 May 2015

Bangor University rated Gold

Bangor University has been awarded the Gold standard in the UK Government’s new Teaching Excellence Framework, and is the only University in Wales to achieve this standard.

The framework assesses universities against a range of criteria and is part of the UK government’s plans for raising standards in higher education. It also gives students more information so that they can make the most informed decisions when deciding which university to attend.

Publication date: 22 June 2017

Bangor University receives two Athena SWAN awards

Bangor University is delighted to announce that the recent Athena SWAN application for an Institution-level Bronze Award has been successful. Furthermore, the School of Ocean Sciences’ application for a department-level Bronze award was also successful. These awards recognise the university's commitment to tackling gender inequality in higher education.

Publication date: 25 October 2018

Bangor University Research Excellence Awards 2016

Bangor University is to highlight and celebrate the high standard of research at the University in a new Research Excellence Awards event to be held for the first time this December, and has just announced the Awards Shortlists.

The inaugural Awards will shine a spotlight on some of the University’s outstanding research teams and individuals.

The winners will be announced at an Awards dinner in Pontio on 5th December 2016.

Publication date: 26 October 2016

Bangor University rewards outstanding impact from its research and enterprise activities

Projects which have benefited local and global communities were rewarded as Bangor University held its third annual Impact and Innovation Awards on the 3rd December 2015.

Publication date: 4 December 2015

Bangor University rewards staff for achieving Research Excellence

A new Research Excellence Awards event has just been held at Bangor University to celebrate the high standard of research at the University.

Publication date: 6 December 2016

Bangor University secures further EU funding for new research hub

Bangor University will benefit from a further £2.8m of EU funding for a new science and innovation hub to boost Wales’ shellfish industry, Finance Secretary Mark Drakeford announced today [Monday 13 August].

Publication date: 13 August 2018

Bangor University's Marine Scientists participate in World Fisheries Congress

The official flag of the World Fisheries Congress has resided at Bangor University for the four years since the last Congress in Yokohama when Professor Michel Kaiser of the School of Ocean Sciences was handed the baton for the upcoming 6th World Fisheries Congress which will open next  Tuesday 8th May at the Edinburgh International Conference Centre, Edinburgh, Scotland.

Publication date: 3 May 2012

Bangor University’s part in the world’s largest Marine Reserve

Bangor University is playing a significant role in the management of the world’s largest marine reserve.

Publication date: 18 December 2015

Bangor University’s Santander Entrepreneurship Pitchers

Three Bangor University students are have been selected to represent the University in the regional finals of the Santander Universities Entrepreneurship Awards competition.

Having competed against over thirty entries to be selected as the final shortlist of six student projects, PhD graduate Ned Hartfiel and Psychology Masters students Alex Bailey and Daniel Pascoe were awarded a cheque for £200 for their entries, and will be eligible for business support through B-Enterprising at the University’s Careers & Employability Service.  

Publication date: 30 March 2017

Bangor University’s satisfied students

Bangor University continues to rise in popularity among its students. The University again retains its place at 14th in the UK and is second in Wales in a new university experience survey (Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey 2016).

Publication date: 17 March 2016

Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences exhibits at Westminster

Bangor University’s world renowned School of Ocean Sciences was invited to exhibit at the House of Commons recently, by Ynys Môn MP, Albert Owen.

Publication date: 16 December 2011

Bangor University Student completes a GO Wales Work Taster

Bangor University student Mollie Duggan Edwards, 20, from Bethel near Caernarfon, has recently completed a GO Wales Work Taster at the Welsh Mountain Zoo, Colwyn Bay.

Mollie is in her third year at Bangor University, studying Marine Biology. She applied for the taster in hope of gaining some valuable work experience to build up her CV.

Publication date: 14 October 2013

Bangor University students awarded prestigious Drapers’ Company medals

Bangor University, School of Ocean Sciences students were presented with the Drapers’ Medals at a recent ceremony. The Drapers’ Company is one of the historic Livery Companies of the City of London, and now a philanthropic organization. The Drapers’ Company kindly donates two medals each year to be awarded to outstanding postgraduate students.

Publication date: 20 February 2017

Bangor University students awarded prestigious Drapers’ Company medals

Bangor University students were presented with the Drapers’ Medals recently. The Drapers’ Company is one of the historic Livery Companies of the City of London, and now a philanthropic organization. The Drapers’ Company kindly donates two medals each year to be awarded to outstanding postgraduate students.

Publication date: 22 February 2016

Bangor University students awarded prestigious Drapers’ Company medals

Bangor University students were presented with the Drapers’ Medals recently. The Drapers’ Company is one of the historic Livery Companies of the City of London, and now a philanthropic organization. The Drapers’ Company kindly donates two medals each year to be awarded to outstanding postgraduate students.

Publication date: 21 May 2015

Bangor University students awarded prestigious Drapers’ Company medals

Two Bangor University students have been presented with Drapers’ Medals. The Drapers’ Company is one of the historic Livery Companies of the City of London, and now a philanthropic organization. The Drapers’ Company kindly donates two medals each year to be awarded to outstanding postgraduate students. These prestigious awards takes into account the quality of a student’s research, teaching, and service to the University and community.

Publication date: 18 July 2018

Bangor University Students Demonstrating Excellent Employability

The annual Employability Celebration evening was held recently to congratulate and showcase Bangor University students who have taken part in the Bangor Employability Award and demonstrated exceptional commitment to developing their employability through extra- and co-curricular activities whilst at University.

Publication date: 8 May 2015

Bangor University student selected for team GB in orienteering championships

A Bangor University student has been selected to represent Great Britain at the World University Orienteering Championships in Finland in July.

Publication date: 18 June 2018

Bangor University students to take part in community tree plant for BBC’s The One Show

Bangor University students will be rolling up their sleeves in front of BBC’s The One Show cameras to help the Maes y Pant community group in Gresford (near Wrexham) to help transform a former quarry into a biodiverse community resource.

Publication date: 16 November 2012

Bangor University subjects join elite in world table

Newly published analysis of the latest influential QS World University Rankings, which saw Bangor University soar to 411th position worldwide, now provides further information on rankings for different subject areas among the world’s best universities.

Six subjects and one subject area taught at Bangor University feature among the world’s elite universities in this year’s release of the QS World University Rankings by Subject, with Agriculture and Forestry appearing in the top 100 institutions worldwide who teach the subject and rising from among last year’s 200 top Universities.

Publication date: 8 March 2017

Bangor University to lead multi million pound Europe-wide project to study the history of our seas

The history of the European marine environment during the past thousand years is the target of a €3.1 million (£2.6 million) project, funded by the European Union and led by scientists from School of Ocean Sciences at Bangor University.  The project, which also involves researchers from Norway, Germany, France, Croatia, Portugal and the Netherlands, will use the shells of very long-lived molluscs as a record of environmental change over the past thousand years.  It builds on research originally developed at Bangor by Professor James Scourse and Professor Chris Richardson that led in 2007 to the discovery of the longest-lived animal known to science – a clam from Iceland that had lived for 507 years.

Publication date: 24 September 2013

Bangor University to reward outstanding impact from its research and enterprise activities

Twelve projects at Bangor University have been shortlisted for the University’s third annual Impact and Innovation Awards 2015, supported by Santander Universities.

These prestigious awards at Bangor University recognise and celebrate the recent impact that the University’s research, innovation and enterprise activities have on the wider economy and society. This year, the University is also introducing a new award category, Outstanding Contribution to Wales, to recognise activities that have led to impact of national significance in Wales.

Publication date: 27 November 2015

Bangor University welcomes latest Sustainable Fisheries Accreditation

Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences has welcomed the news that the fishery producing Manx Queenies, the Isle of Man’s queen scallops, has been awarded a sustainability certification under the Marine Stewardship Council programme. 

Experts in sustainable fisheries at the School have worked with the Isle of Man  (IOM) Government’s Department of Environment Food and Agriculture since 2006, to advise them how to manage the fishery sustainably.

Publication date: 19 May 2011

Barney the dog finds 50 year old drifter

A keen fell-walker and beachcomber was surprised by what his dog Barney found on a beach recently.

Publication date: 15 August 2014

BBC Countryfile appearance for Bangor University scientists

Think of reefs and your mind may wander to blue tropical oceans or the famous Barrier Reef. But reefs exist in a variety of locations- and not all are made of coral…

Publication date: 14 June 2013

BBC Radio Wales Science Cafe

Andy Davies, Gareth Williams and I were interviewed about tropical and temperate coral reefs for Science Café.

Publication date: 20 June 2016

Best wishes to Steve as he carries the Olympic Flame today

Steve Barnard, an MSc student at Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences is running with the London 2012 Olympic Torch in Morecambe on July 22.

Publication date: 22 June 2012

Blue Planet II: can we really halt the coral reef catastrophe?

The third episode of the BBC’s Blue Planet II spectacularly described a series of fascinating interactions between species on some of the most pristine reefs in the world. These reefs, analogous to bustling cities, are powered by sunlight, and provide space and services for a wealth of marine life.

This article by John Turner, Professor & Dean of Postgraduate Research, School of Ocean Sciences was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 15 November 2017

Bringing Bangor’s buzz to the Bay

Again this year, staff from Bangor University are contributing their expertise to a number of  core and fringe events at this year’s National Eisteddfod, which is being held in Cardiff between 30-11 August.

Publication date: 3 August 2018

Broadcaster Miranda Krestovnikoff presents ‘A whistle-stop tour around the coast’

TV presenter Miranda Krestovnikoff is to give ‘A whistle-stop tour around the coast’ at a special public lecture in Bangor University on Wednesday, 31 January at 5.30pm in Pontio Lecture Room 5.  The lecture is free and all are welcome, but tickets are required.  They can be booked through the Pontio website or by calling the Box Office on 01248 382828.

Publication date: 4 January 2018

Bronze for Ben in Hill Climb Championship

Ben Butler, a final year PhD student from the School of Ocean Sciences, claimed bronze at the British Universities Hill Climb Championship on Saturday 24th October.

The event saw nearly 200 student cyclists from across Britain tackle the notoriously hard climb up Curbar Gap in the Peak District. The road has an average gradient of 11% over 1 mile, making it a truly testing effort for all of the participants. Riders were set off individually at 1 minute intervals to set their best time up the climb.

Publication date: 30 October 2015

Call of the Sea(World)

A Bangor University student from Tenerife is on course to achieve his lifelong dream of pursuing a career in the marine environment. 

Publication date: 20 July 2018

Cancelled: Talk precedes creation of largest-ever recorded ice-berg

 This talk has had to be cancelled due to unforseen circumstances.

As glaciologists, climatologists and oceanographers await an anticipated break in an Antarctic ice shelf, set to create one of the largest icebergs ever recorded – around one quarter of the size of Wales – staff and students at Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences are eagerly anticipating a talk on the subject from a member of the British Antarctic Survey.

Professor Hilmar Gudmundsson from the British Antarctic Survey discusses “Ocean-induced thinning of Antarctic Ice Shelves and the impact on the ice flow of the Antarctic Ice Sheet” at 6.00 on February 2 at 6pm in the Main Arts Lecture Theatre. This lecture to the University’s students and academics may be of interest to the public given the current fate of the Larsen C ice shelf, which is within 20 kilometres of breaking free.

Publication date: 31 January 2017

Careers opportunities in Marine Sciences highlighted

Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences held its annual careers fair to highlight the huge jobs potential in one of the fastest growing sectors of the UK Economy, the Marine sector.

Publication date: 22 March 2018

Chris Coleman visits Bangor University to receive Honour

Chis Coleman, Wales’ national football team manager joins Bangor Business School graduating students to receive an Honorary Fellowship, marking Wales’ outstanding achievement at Euro 2016, when the national team reached the semi-finals in an historic and memorable campaign.

Publication date: 17 July 2017

Citizen Scientists sought to investigate our saltmarshes

We are an island nation, and yet we know surprisingly little about parts of our coastline.

Publication date: 1 July 2016

Clams reveal secrets of changing marine climate

Marine scientists at Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences are collecting useful information about climate change from an unlikely source – seashells.

Publication date: 26 September 2013

Climate Change Consortium of Wales (C3W)

Sophie Wilmes from the School of Ocean Sciences, a first year HPC Wales PhD student, recently took part in a workshop on the use of High Performance Computing (HPC) in tidal modelling applications, held at the prestigious premises of The Royal Society.

Publication date: 12 December 2012

Coastal light pollution

Have you ever given a thought to how light pollution in our coastal towns may be affecting our marine neighbours?

The School of Ocean Sciences at Bangor University is leading a new four year project funded by the Natural Environment Research Council, that will improve our understand of how light pollution from coastal towns and cities impacts life along our shores.

Publication date: 13 December 2018

Coastal light pollution disturbs marine animals, new study shows

Marine ecosystems can be changed by night-time artificial lighting according to new research published in the journal Biology Letters. The results indicate that light pollution from coastal communities, shipping and offshore infrastructure could be changing the composition of marine invertebrate communities.

Publication date: 29 April 2015

Commonwealth Scholarship Success for Marine Science Graduates bound for New Zealand

Three Bangor University students are among eight to have been awarded Commonwealth Scholarships this year.

The Scholarships and Commission are awarded for postgraduate study and professional development to Commonwealth citizens, providing opportunities for student from developing countries to study at Bangor University, and Bangor graduates to study overseas. 

Publication date: 5 January 2016

Community-led marine reserve sees lobsters thrive

The first and only fully-protected marine reserve in Scotland is proving highly beneficial for marine conservation and fisheries, with lobsters more than doubling in numbers and increasing in size.

Conducting potting surveys over four years in Lamlash Bay, Firth of Clyde, Scotland, scientists from the Universities of York and Bangor monitored populations of European lobster (Homarus gammarus), brown crab (Cancer pagurus) and velvet swimming crabs (Necora puber).

Publication date: 3 October 2016

Could Orkney lead the way in generating low carbon electricity?

Marine renewable energy experts at Bangor University have published a new study which examines the potential of Orkney, in the north of Scotland, to generate low carbon electricity through tidal turbines.

Publication date: 17 March 2014

Could the Arctic be coming out of hibernation?

Reduced ice cover in the Arctic Ocean could be the reason why the UK has experienced colder winters recently.

 

The ice has acted to insulate temperature changes in the sea from the atmosphere. But as the ice decreases in coverage this could have a consequent effect on our climate.

 

“Some climatologists believe the absence of sea ice north of Siberia last autumn allowed the warmer open ocean to heat the atmosphere, resulting in changed wind patterns and the development of a “blocking” atmospheric high pressure system over Siberia. This then results in cold air being channelled south from the Arctic, over northern Europe,” explains Dr Tom Rippeth of Bangor University.

 

Scientists at the University have also just discovered that the Arctic Ocean, is not as tranquil as previously supposed by oceanographers and this too could have an effect on the climate.

Publication date: 16 March 2011

Dating Anglesey’s birth as an island and formation of the Menai Strait

Research has revealed when Anglesey became a permanent island through the formation of the Menai Strait.

Mike Roberts, a mature student from Amlwch, conducted the research as part of his PhD at Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences, supported by the Cemlyn Jones Trust and the Countryside Council for Wales.

His research, just published in an academic journal, reveals that the Strait became a permanent feature between 5,800 and 4,600 years ago around the time when hunter-gatherers were replaced by the first farmers in north Wales.

Publication date: 1 March 2011

Day of reckoning for marine invaders

Volunteers in North Wales are being asked to help national campaign to track an invasion taking place around the UK’s coastline.

Publication date: 6 September 2017

Discussing the disappearance of the Arctic Sea ice

As Arctic sea ice reaches its lowest-ever recorded level in over three decades, Bangor University physical oceanographers Dr Tom Rippeth and Ben Lincoln of the School of Ocean Sciences are discussing the implications of this data with Adam Walton on Radio Wales’ Science Café programme on Tuesday 18.9.12 at 7.00 pm.

Publication date: 18 September 2012

Does a new era of bleaching beckon for Indian Ocean coral reefs?

Despite extensive media coverage, campaigns and scientists’ warnings, still the world is not fully aware of what coral bleaching is and why it is happening. Mention bleaching and some think that it is the death of the Great Barrier Reef’s coral, but the problem is much more widespread. 

This article by Ronan Roche, Research Fellow, Bangor University and John Turner, Professor & Dean of Postgraduate Research, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 10 March 2017

Enough 'Anthropocene' nonsense – we already know the world is in crisis

At a public seminar at a respected university in Scandinavia on how to promote cross-disciplinary research last year, the dean of one of the faculties passed the comment that “now we are living in the Anthropocene, everything we see around us, everything in our environment, we realise is the result of human activity”.

An article by James Scourse, Professor of Marine Geology and Director of the Climate Change Consortium of Wales, was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.


Publication date: 15 January 2016

Envision Doctoral Training Programme Launched

‘Envision’ is a new Doctoral Training Partnership, funded by NERC and led by a highly successful group of UK research institutions, will recruit 60 PhD students (12 per year for the next five years commencing January 2014).

Publication date: 14 January 2014

European Champion Rafter becomes a Doctor

A student who began white water rafting at Bangor University, and has represented Great Britain in the sport, has also just added to her degrees from Bangor University.

Publication date: 24 July 2015

Even Coral Reefs are affected by socio-economics

Marine biologists working to save the world’s coral reefs say that they are increasingly being affected by human activities. As a result, the marine biologists now need to include an assessment of the effects of activities, perhaps in distant markets or cities, on the survival of coral reefs.

Writing in a special issue of Functional Ecology, “Coral reef functional ecology in the Anthropocene”, and using coral reefs as an example, the scientists call for the inclusion of socio-economic activity into account when predicting future ecosystem responses of coral reefs.

Publication date: 21 February 2019

Extreme weather in Europe linked to less sea ice and warming in the Barents Sea

This article by Yueng-Djern Lenn, Senior Lecturer in Physical Oceanography, Benjamin Barton, PhD Researcher, School of Ocean Sciences and Camille Lique, Research scientist in physical oceanography, Institut Français de Recherche pour l’Exploitation de la Mer (Ifremer) was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 30 August 2018

Falkland Islands Blog

Publication date: 21 January 2013

Fantastic Finnish opportunity for Charlotte

A talented Bangor University student with a keen interest in the environment has recently began a PhD at Helsinki University. Charlotte Angove, 22, from Rawcliffe, York, received a Master of Marine Biology degree (MMBiol) after studying for four years at the School of Ocean Sciences.

Publication date: 17 July 2015

First partially sighted ascent of Matterhorn

A Bangor University researcher will soon attempt to complete the first partially sighted ascent of the Matterhorn in Switzerland.

Publication date: 29 August 2013

First textbook on ocean renewable energy published

A potential source of renewable energy surrounds us – the ocean – a vast natural resource that could potentially meet all of the world’s growing demand for electricity several times over.

With recent investments, R&D, and academic research into ocean renewable energy, it was considered timely to produce a textbook on the fundamentals of ocean renewable energy. This book, published by Bangor University ocean energy expert Dr Simon Neill, in collaboration with Dr Reza Hashemi at the University of Rhode Island, is the first published in this new topic.

Publication date: 28 June 2018

Fourth Bangor Science Festival is on the horizon

Planning for the fourth annual Bangor Science Festival is well under way and the 2014 Festival is certainly shaping up.  The Science Festival will be held during National Science and Engineering Week from Friday 14th March and Sunday23rd March 2014.

Publication date: 28 January 2014

Friends raise tens of thousands of pounds to help Dr Sophie Williams return home

A gin festival, a sponsored climb of Snowdon, specially designed Christmas cards and a hair-shaving event are just some of the many fund-raising activities carried out by friends and family of Sophie Williams in the last few months. The money is needed to make adaptations to Sophie’s home to provide wheel-chair access and space for the carers she needs 24 hours a day.

Sophie, a lecturer in Bangor University, suffered brain injury when on fieldwork in China in 2015. She has limited movement below the neck and depends on a ventilator. The work to her home in Sling, near Tregarth, is expected to cost around £60,000.

Publication date: 17 January 2018

Girls get a chance to 'discover science'

Exploring the rocky shore in muddy wellies - then wearing a white lab coat - isn’t usually how 14-year- old girls spend their Saturday mornings.

Publication date: 25 February 2013

Globally significant work by Bangor graduate to be put to the test

A new global policy, initiated by a Bangor University graduate will be put to the test for the first time, now that a huge iceberg, estimated to be more than a quarter of the size of Wales, has broken free from Antarctica.

Publication date: 19 July 2017

Group gears up to support Seafish in enhancing understanding of seafood science in the UK

Michel Kaiser, Professor of Marine Conservation Ecology at Bangor University is to chair a new Science Advisory Group (SAG).

Established by Seafish, SAG will provide high-quality, independent scientific challenge and support  

Publication date: 10 September 2015

Hard to fish areas of the seabed may act as refuges for endangered skate

Marine scientists working in the Celtic Sea have discovered a natural refuge for the critically endangered flapper skate. Many elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates) are highly vulnerable to over-fishing, but a new paper in the open access journal PLOS ONE shows that small areas of the seabed that experience below-average fishing intensity can sustain greater populations of these species.

Publication date: 15 November 2012

Heat from the Atlantic Ocean is melting Arctic sea ice further eastwards than ever before

The seasonal sea-ice retreat across the Arctic Ocean is perhaps one of the most conspicuous indicators of climate change. In September 2012, a new record was set for the time that we have been tracking sea ice with satellites: the minimum sea ice extent was some 50% below the climatic average for that month. Four years on, and the September 2016 record tied with 2007 for the second lowest sea ice extent since measurements began in 1978.

Publication date: 19 April 2017

High-res data offer most detailed look yet at trawl fishing footprint around the world

About a quarter of the world's seafood caught in the ocean comes from bottom trawling, a method that involves towing a net along the seabed on continental shelves and slopes to catch shrimp, cod, rockfish, sole and other kinds of bottom-dwelling fish and shellfish. The technique impacts these seafloor ecosystems, because other marine life and habitats can be unintentionally killed or disturbed as nets pass across the seafloor.

A new analysis that uses high-resolution data for 24 ocean regions in Africa, Europe, North and South America and Australasia shows that only 14 percent of the overall seafloor shallower than 1,000 meters (3,280 feet) is trawled. Most trawl fishing happens in this depth range along continental shelves and slopes in the world's oceans. The study focused on this depth range, covering an area of about 7.8 million square kilometers of ocean.

Publication date: 9 October 2018

Historic wrecks to assist Wales’ marine renewable energy future

Historic wrecks around Wales’ coastline, such as that of a German submarine sunk 10 miles off Bardsey Island at the tip of the Llŷn Peninsula on Christmas Day 1917, are to play a part in assisting Wales’ growing marine renewable energy sector.

Over the next two years, marine scientists from Bangor University will be surveying the coast of Wales as part of the ERDF-funded SEACAMS2 project led by the University in partnership with Swansea University. The researchers at Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences and Centre for Applied Marine Sciences are undertaking collaborative research, including marine surveys, to support the sustainable growth of the marine renewable energy sector in Wales. 

Publication date: 8 September 2018

Hitachi-GE, Imperial and Bangor University developing UK and Welsh BWR expertise

Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd. (Hitachi-GE) has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with Imperial College London and Bangor University, enhancing its commitment to support Welsh and British expertise.

Publication date: 31 October 2016

How does the crab shed its shell?

Anglers everywhere would probably agree that, in season, there’s no better bait than freshly moulted crab. During the moulting season, nothing else works as successfully, as fish are in a frenzy for the ‘delicacy’ of a soft crab. But we’re unlikely to see a crab losing its shell as we walk along our shoreline.

Publication date: 2 June 2015

How hot is your mangrove?

Ocean Sciences and Qatari researchers examine what sustains mangroves on desert coastlines, where nutrient input from rainfall cannot be what drives mangrove production. Broadcast by Qatar National Television, December 2016. Narrative in Arab, with interviews in English. Beautiful footage of arid mangroves.

Publication date: 19 December 2016

How much protection is enough?

Protection of marine areas from fishing increases density and biomass of fish and invertebrates (such as lobster and scallops) finds a systematic review published in BioMed Central’s open access journal Environmental Evidence. The success of a protected area was also dependent on its size and on how it was managed, however even partial protection provides significant ecological  benefits.

Publication date: 28 February 2013

How to start a business for under £5,000

Students, graduates and staff of the University recently learned how to start a business for less than £5,000 in a ‘Start-Up Smart presentation organised by the B-Enterprising Project at the Careers & Employability Service. The event was well attended by over sixty people from a variety of academic subject backgrounds and University departments.

Publication date: 31 May 2011

HRH The Prince of Wales opens Marine Centre Wales at Bangor University

HRH The Prince of Wales visited Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences  recently (5 July) to open Marine Centre Wales.  The Prince also took the opportunity to visit the R.V. Prince Madog, the largest university research vessel in the UK.

Publication date: 5 July 2016

Interesting finds on Welsh beaches

Unusual creatures found on beaches in north and south Wales this summer are identified as a species of 'stalked' or 'goose' barnacle.

Publication date: 22 August 2012

International workshop on Ocean Mixing and Sediment Transport, Guangzhou, China

A workshop on Ocean Mixing and Sediment Transport in the ocean was jointly organised by Sun Yat-Sen University and Bangor University. The workshop was attended by over 150 scientists from across the global.

Publication date: 23 September 2016

Invictus Games Gold Medal Winner returns to education

A gold medal winner at the recent Invinctus Games has recently started studying for a degree at Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences.

Publication date: 7 October 2014

Irish Ambassador visits Bangor University

Bangor University hosted Ireland’s Ambassador to the UK recently and showcased some of the ongoing research collaborations between Bangor and Irish partner institutions.

Publication date: 13 July 2017

Is a white Christmas on the cards for North Wales?

Professor Tom Rippeth of Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences assesses the likelihood of a white Christmas for north Wales.

Publication date: 13 December 2016

Is fishing with electricity less destructive than digging up the seabed with beam trawlers?

While many people may be interested in the sustainability and welfare of the fish they eat, or the health of the environment, fewer probably worry about the effect that trawl fishing – which accounts for 20% of landings – has on the ocean.

This article by Michel Kaiser, Chair of Marine Conservation Ecology, School of Ocean Sciences was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 8 January 2018

Journal edited by Bangor academic ranked #1 in its field

A journal edited by an academic at Bangor University which is an essential resource for all of those interested in the biology, conservation and exploitation of fish has been ranked number one it its field.

Publication date: 3 September 2014

Juggling self-employment and studying paid off for talented future geoscientist

A self-employed dressage rider and horse trainer who juggled working whilst studying, graduates from Bangor University this week. After studying for four years at the School of Ocean Sciences, Bonita Barrett-Crosdil, 22, from Pulborough, West Sussex graduated with a MOcean Geological Oceanography

Publication date: 17 July 2015

Leading Oceanographers produced for over 45 years

The MSc in Applied Physical Oceanography at Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences is plugging identified skills gaps in the UK environment sector, producing oceanographers who are, among other things, capable of computer modelling and are very numerate. (According to a Research Council review of the top 15 skills needed in the environment sector, computer modelling is at the top and numeracy fourth).

Publication date: 14 February 2011

Learned Society of Wales appoints four Bangor Fellows

The Learned Society of Wales has this year named four academics from Bangor University among the new Fellows elected to the Society from across the arts, humanities, sciences and public service sectors.  Election to Fellowship is a public recognition of academic excellence, and LSW Fellowship is keenly competed. Fellows are elected following a rigorous examination of their achievements in their relevant fields.

Publication date: 19 April 2018

Local appointees to UK SEAFISH board

Two north Wales based marine professionals have been appointed to the Board of the Sea Fish Industry Authority (Seafish) by the UK’s four Fisheries Ministers. 

Prof Mike Kaiser of Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences will be a non-executive member from 1 April 2012 until 31 March 2015. He was first appointed and has served on the Board since 2008.

Publication date: 19 March 2012

Longest-lived animals reveal climate change secrets

Researchers at Bangor University have used some of the world’s longest-lived animals to look at how the North Atlantic Ocean has affected our climate over the past 1,000 years.

Publication date: 12 June 2012

Longest-living animal gives up ocean climate secrets

Analysis of the quahog clam reveals how the oceans affected the climate over the past 1000 years

A study of the longest-living animal on Earth, the quahog clam, has provided researchers with an unprecedented insight into the history of the oceans.

Publication date: 6 December 2016

Love of the outdoors inspires career change

A successful software company director graduates from Bangor University this week after taking the necessary step in a transitioning career.

Publication date: 10 July 2014

Madagascar Evening

Students and staff in the School of Environment, Natural Resources and Geography are organising a fund-raising evening to support the conservation work of the Malagasy NGO Madagasikara Voakajy (http://www.madagasikara-voakajy.org/) with which the School has a really close relationship.

Publication date: 12 April 2013

Major conference on Irish Sea Sustainability

A major conference on fisheries management in the Irish Sea has taken place bringing together experts and academics from Wales, Ireland and Europe.

Publication date: 25 March 2013

Mapping Australia’s tidal energy potential

School of Ocean Sciences researchers helping to develop a dynamically coupled wave-tide computer model of the Australian tidal energy resource. AREA is a $2.49 million 3 year project to map the tidal energy resource of Australian waters.

Publication date: 17 July 2017

Marine Centre Wales opens its doors for Menai Seafood Festival

Visitors to the Menai Seafood Festival on Saturday (20 August) will have an unique opportunity to see behind the scenes at Bangor University's brand new Marine Centre Wales in Menai Bridge.

During what will be the first public open day since the Centre was officially opened by HRH The Prince of Wales in July, there will be interactive displays, demonstrations and walk-in cinema screenings showcasing the innovative work carried out by the School of Ocean Sciences.

Publication date: 16 August 2016

Meet the School of Ocean Sciences, Menai Bridge

You are invited to step aboard the Research Vessel, Prince Madog and visit Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences.

Publication date: 31 May 2011

Melting ice sheets will have global impact on ocean tides

Whilst it is widely accepted that sea level is rising because of the melting of the massive sheets covering Greenland and Antarctica, a new paper in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans, (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JC013109/abstract), by scientists at Bangor University in collaboration with Harvard and Oregon State Universities in the US, and McGill University in Canada, shows that the impact of the melting of these ice sheets will go far beyond just changing water levels. It could have further reaching impacts on global climate.

The new results show that sea level does not increase uniformly across the globe in response to melting of the polar ice sheets. In fact, sea level changes in response to ice loss are highly spatially variable, especially close to the retreating ice sheets. The new results, which are obtained with a numerical model of the global tides, show that the tidal changes due to ice sheet collapse and associated sea level changes will be highly variable and affect a number of different important processes. 

Publication date: 8 November 2017

Micro-gels in Arctic and Antarctic pack ice

Since 2006 Professor Graham Underwood & Dr Shazia Aslam from  the University of Essex and Professor David Thomas from Bangor University's School of Ocean Sciences have led several projects (funded by the Natural Environment Research Council) to study the production of micro-gels, and their widespread importance to the frozen realms of the worlds oceans. They teamed up with colleagues from Australia and Canada to collect and analyse ice cores from both the Arctic and Antarctic. Seven years on, and many frozen trips later they are publishing a rather surprising finding – They, and their co-workers found that there is a strong relationship - spanning ice from both the Arctic and Antarctic - between the physical nature of the ice, the amount of microbiology it contains and the concentrations of gels.

Publication date: 10 September 2013

Mixing Marine Science with Music

Having harboured a passion for both music and marine science, a Bangor University student has graduated with pride, scooping up prizes and accolades along the way. Samuel Hartharn-Evans, 21, from Bebington, Wirral has not only graduated with a first-class BSc Marine Biology & Oceanography degree, but has also won the Dr John Robert Jones Prize of £600, which is awarded annually to the best students across all disciplines at the University.  

Publication date: 20 July 2018

Mixing waters up in the Southern Ocean

The Southern Ocean encircles Antarctica and plays a key role in controlling the global climate. It is here that ocean currents return from the abyss to the surface, closing the global ocean overturning circulation. This circulation drives the poleward transport of heat, which is critical to the relatively mild weather here in the UK.

New research by Bangor University and the National Oceanography Centre, Liverpool, has for the first time identified a new process that contributes to this upwelling of abyssal water, a key component of the global overturning circulation.

Publication date: 1 December 2014

More in depth data is required to reveal the true global footprint of fishing

There has been a lot of debate recently on the extent of the global fishing footprint. A recent paper claimed that fishing affects 55% of the world’s oceans. Given that many people in the developing world rely on fish as their main source of protein, and the increasing preference for luxury fish products in countries such as China, such statistics might seem plausible.

This article by Michel Kaiser, Honorary Professor, School of Ocean Sciences, is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 23 October 2018

Natural Resources Wales Chief Executive visits 25-year research programme

Dr Emyr Roberts Chief Executive of Natural Resources Wales (NRW) visited Bangor University to present a guest lecture on Natural Resources Wales and opportunities for the integrated management of our natural resources to a gathered audience of students and staff.

Publication date: 12 December 2014

New €7m EU investment in Wales and Ireland’s fisheries industry

Around €5.5m of EU funds will support the Bluefish marine science partnership, which will investigate the effects of climate change in the Irish Sea on the sustainability of fish and shellfish.

Led by Bangor University, in partnership with Irish and Welsh organisations, the project will assess how climate change is affecting the health of fish stocks, the migratory movement of commercial fish, and risks from new non-native species.

Publication date: 6 March 2017

New EU project to help grow the fisheries industry in Wales and Ireland

More than €1m of EU funds will be invested in a new project to support the growth of the shellfish industry in Wales and Ireland.

The Irish Sea Portal Pilot will investigate patterns of movement of shellfish in the Irish Sea to help reduce the costs of locating shellfish seed and help increase the volume of mussels and shellfish available to the industry.

Publication date: 21 February 2017

New information makes it easier to ‘Think global, act local’ when conserving coral reefs

Coral reefs provide vital resources, acting as both feeding grounds for fish stocks and natural barriers protecting vulnerable coastlines, among other essential ecosystem services.

But they’re under increasing threat of ‘bleaching’ – when the symbiotic algae that live within the coral are expelled due to warmer sea temperatures, starving the coral of photosynthetic energy and weakening the viability of the whole coral reef structure in the process.

Publication date: 6 February 2017

New information network will support the development of marine renewable energy

We delight in the wonderful views and opportunities for leisure provided by Wales’ spectacular coastline. But being surrounded on three sides by water also offers other opportunities- to provide us with a sustainable source of energy, and in the process create employment opportunities.

SEACAMS 2 a £17 M three year project at Bangor and Swansea universities, part funded by the European Regional Development Fund, is an investment in the potential offered by the marine economy and marine renewable energy.  Through SEACAMS, companies wanting to harness the sea’s power and create a sustainable marine energy industry in Wales will be able to access vital research support they need if they are to be able to progress with their multi-million pound developments.

Publication date: 29 September 2016

New more efficient method of sampling biodiversity showcased in major UK estuaries

Two of the UK’s major estuaries have proved to be a successful testing-ground for an effective new method of ‘health-checking’ aquatic biodiversity, which could lead to faster and more efficient sampling for other sites.

“Bio-monitoring” or assessing the impacts of human activities in the natural environment is often achieved by monitoring biological diversity.  Existing methods rely on manual identification, but that takes time, resources and often focuses on larger creatures, that sometimes may not be able to reflect accurately the health of particular habitats.

Publication date: 9 February 2015

New MSc at Bangor University generating electricity and jobs in marine renewable energy

Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences has developed a new 1-year MSc in Marine Renewable Energy.

Marine renewable energy uses the natural power of waves and tides to generate electricity.  Marine renewables is an exciting, fast growing, high tech industry that has the potential to become one of the largest high tech exportable industries in the UK economy. The development of Swansea Bay tidal lagoon is estimated to create 70,000 jobs in the construction phase alone, and there are many other initiatives in Wales such as the Crown Estate Irish Sea demonstration zones, and the Minesto Deep Green project to the west of Anglesey, where the School of Ocean Sciences is based.

Publication date: 10 June 2015

New NE African records of ancient climate support early dates for initial human dispersal Out of Africa

The origin and population expansion of anatomically modern humans (AMH) continues to be a much-debated area of research. 

The previously established consensus is that humans originated on the African continent, in the area of the East African Rift Valley, and subsequently migrated “Out of Africa” around 70,000 years ago.  But there are a host of authors that suggest differently; with some of the more recent genetic evidence as well as somewhat limited archaeological evidence suggesting a much earlier date for the migration - around 120,000 to 130,000 years ago. 

Against this back-drop, there is surprisingly little direct evidence of what the climate was like in East Africa over this time, yet it is acknowledged that this influences patterns of human migration.

Newly published research in Scientific Reports aims to plug this hole in our knowledge.

Publication date: 24 January 2018

New research points to the crash site of missing plane MH370

Two years on and Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 is still missing. The plane disappeared on March 14 2014, probably over the southern Indian Ocean to the west of Australia. Despite an estimated $130m search by Australian, Chinese and Malaysian authorities, covering120,000 square km of ocean (an area around half the size of the UK), the crash site and the bulk of the aircraft have not been found.

Publication date: 27 July 2016

New ‘Safe Operating Spaces’ set to sustain world’s coral reefs

Leading coral reef science experts call for new ’safe operating spaces’ to be agreed to ensure the survival of valuable coral reefs for the future.

In a review article published this week in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, (Guiding coral Reef Futures in the Anthropocene doi 10.1002/fee.1427), which draws together all the latest knowledge on coral reefs, the scientists argue that, globally, we should agree ‘safe operating spaces’ or buffers in order to ensure survival of coral reefs.

Publication date: 3 November 2016

New warning system to find ‘alien’ invaders in Welsh seas

A new warning system is being developed that could reduce the damage caused to Welsh marine industries and native wildlife by non-native or ‘alien’ creatures in coastal waters.

Publication date: 22 January 2014

Ocean Mixing Experts head for Bangor

Experts in Ocean Mixing from across the planet are heading to the Marine Centre Wales at Bangor University for an International workshop on “Ocean Mixing” (11th – 13th July).

The scientists from as far afield as the US, China and Russia, as well as continental Europe and the UK, will be discussing global efforts to improve understanding of the processes which stir up the oceans and how those processes should be represented in weather and climate forecast models.  

Publication date: 11 July 2017

Ocean Oases: How islands support more sea-life

A 60 year-old theory to explain why seas surrounding islands and atolls are particularly productive has just been proven by a marine biologist from Bangor University’s School of Ocean Science, working with a colleague at the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Publication date: 16 February 2016

Oceanography on top of the world

Ice, ocean, atmosphere. These three components constitute the health of the Arctic climate. At the heart of this system is one of the least studied bodies of water on the planet: the Beaufort Gyre, a slowly swirling bowl of icy water north of Alaska ten times the size of Lake Michigan.

Publication date: 15 August 2012

Ocean Sciences enjoy new links with oceanographers in China

The Vice-Chancellor Professor John G. Hughes has welcomed a delegation of Physical Oceanographers from Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China, on a visit to Marine Centre Wales, recently.

Publication date: 24 July 2017

Ocean Sciences on BBC radio Wales: invasive species and coastal protection by salt marshes

Dr Katherine Griffith and Dr Martin Skov were interviewed for the 10th of March ‘Science Café’ programme on Radio Wales, as part of the preparations for the Bangor Science week.

Publication date: 11 March 2015

Ocean Sciences Professors James Scourse & Chris Richardson discuss IPCC on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme

Click here to view the Radio programme

Publication date: 30 September 2013

Ocean Sciences scientists escape the heat to research Arctic sea-ice melt

Members of the School of Ocean Sciences have just joined a research cruise to the Arctic Ocean.  Research Officers Ben Powell and Ben Lincoln and PhD student Suzie Jackson are all part of the School’s Ocean Physics research group. They will be joined later by Dr Tom Rippeth and another PhD student, Josh Griffiths.

Publication date: 18 July 2013

Ocean Study by Satellite Rewarded

A Bangor scientist is to be honoured for his work on using satellites to study the ocean. David Bowers of the School of Ocean Sciences is to be given the Award of the Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry Society (RSPSoc). This award is granted for ‘services to remote sensing…through sustained and distinguished contribution to furthering science and applications which use remote sensing’.

Publication date: 19 August 2015

Open Day at Brambell Natural History Museum, Bangor University with the Herpetological Society

Bangor University’s Natural History collections housed at Brambell Building will be open to the public on Saturday 16th April between 11am and 3pm.

This will be an opportunity to visit the University’s Natural History Museum, which is not usually accessible to the public, to learn more about the animals and plants on display. There will be a chance to ask questions of the available volunteers, and there will be an activities corner for children of all ages.

Publication date: 12 April 2016

Open Day at Brambell Natural History Museum, with drop in drawing sessions

Bangor University’s Natural History collections housed at Brambell Building will be open to the public on Saturday 14thMay between 11am and 3pm.

Publication date: 4 May 2016

Outstanding Bangor University student receives national award for marine conservation research

Bangor University PhD student Jack Emmerson has been awarded the Marine Conservation Society Wakefield Memorial Award, for his project ‘Sustainable static-gear fisheries in the Irish Sea’. 

Publication date: 1 February 2016

Plastic Pollution and Our Planet

As ‘Our Planet’, a nature documentary narrated by Bangor University Honorary Graduate Sir David Attenborough launches on Netflix, Marine Biology student Thea Moule shares her experience of plastic pollution.

Publication date: 5 April 2019

Potential 'hot-spots' for sea ice melting identified in the Arctic Ocean

The Arctic region is warming up twice as fast as the rest of the planet. This rapid temperature increase has caused record-breaking seasonal retreat in Arctic Ocean sea ice in recent years. The latest minimum recorded was set in September 2012, while the sea ice cover in September 2016 tied with 2007 for the second lowest extent ever recorded. And it’s not just coverage that’s the problem, sea ice is also thinning, with a current average thickness of 3.2m in the Central Arctic.

Publication date: 26 October 2016

Prestigious early career award goes to PhD student

A Bangor University PhD student is the first female to be awarded an international prize for her outstanding work in the field of marine sedimentology.

Megan Baker was awarded the International Association of Sedimentologists RICHARD W. FAAS RESEARCH PRIZE and a cash award of €2000. The Faas prize is awarded every two years to an early career researcher. This is also the first time that this prize has been awarded to a PhD student.

Publication date: 30 January 2019

Pristine Antarctic fjords contain similar levels of microplastics to open oceans near big civilisations

In the middle of the last century, mass-produced, disposable plastic waste started washing up on shorelines, and to be found in the middle of the oceans. This has since become an increasingly serious problem, spreading globally to even the most remote places on Earth. Just a few decades later, in the 1970s, scientists found the same problem was occurring at a much less visible, microscopic level, with microplastics.

This article by Alexis Janosik, Assistant Professor of Biology, University of West FloridaDavid Barnes, Data Interpretation Ecologist, British Antarctic SurveyJames Scourse, Professor of Physical Geography, University of Exeter, and Katrien Van Landeghem, Senior Lecturer in Marine Geology, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 16 July 2018

Promising future ahead for photographer Kristopher

The School of Ocean Sciences at Bangor University has been highly praised by an Irish student who will be graduating this week. Kristopher Humphreys, from Drogheda in Ireland decided to study Marine Biology after hearing positive comments about the course and the University.

Publication date: 14 July 2016

Proposal to establish the Dr Eilir Hedd Morgan Bangor University Scholarship fund

Following the untimely death of Dr Eilir Morgan on 1st April 2013 the School of Ocean Sciences proposes to establish a fund in his memory. A group of close friends of Eilir's convened to discuss the purpose of the fund and it was agreed that we would invite donations.

Publication date: 4 June 2013

Protecting the amazing Chagos archipelago - Blog

Publication date: 21 March 2013

Pupils get taste of Uni Life

Almost 50 pupils from schools and colleges throughout North Wales got to experience university life for themselves at Bangor University recently.

Publication date: 11 July 2018

Quantifying melting glaciers’ effect on ocean currents

A team of scientists from Bangor University and the University of Sheffield have used a computer climate model to study how freshwater entering the oceans at the end of ice-ages 140,000 years ago, affected the parts of the ocean currents that control climate. This is the first study of this kind for the time period.

Publication date: 20 May 2011

Quantifying the environmental cost of fishing on the seabed

Trawling contributes 20% of the global landings of fish caught at sea, hence it is an essential means of providing food for millions of people.

Bottom trawling is used to catch fish and shellfish that live in or near the seabed. Despite its importance, bottom trawling causes variable amounts of physical and biological change to seabed habitats, and can induce structural and functional changes in seabed communities. Understanding the ecosystem consequences of trawling is important so that we can reduce negative impacts on the seabed through appropriate management measures.

Publication date: 18 July 2017

‘Queenie’ scallops win Award with assistance from Bangor University

Support and advice from Bangor University’s renowned School of Ocean Sciences has assisted the Isle of Man ‘Queenie’ fishery to win the prestigious Billingsgate Sustainable Fisheries Award. And the future looks bright for the Isle of Man fishing industry. Once in decline, the now sustainably fished ‘queenie’ fishery is providing a high value product sought after by best restaurants around the UK.

Publication date: 14 February 2011

Recent advances in understanding coral resilience to rising sea surface temperatures are an essential component of global efforts to safeguard coral reefs

A review of the literature points to the importance of reducing global carbon dioxide emissions in addition to protecting or augmenting resilience mechanisms in the face of increased frequency of climate change impacts.

Publication date: 22 January 2018

Reefs that experience high frequency temperature variability most likely to resist coral bleaching

As scientists and conservationists race to work out the best way to conserve the world’s coral reefs, a new study reveals why some reefs appear to be more resistant to coral bleaching during ocean warming events and calls for higher-resolution data to be collected.

Publication date: 30 April 2018

REF 2014: Ocean Sciences sailing high on recent REF results

Research submitted by Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences to the REF unit of assessment “Earth Systems and Environment” has been recognised as being 15th out of 43 within the UK sector for its research quality.

Publication date: 19 December 2014

Researchers reveal that sharks are hygienic

Scientists at Bangor University have shown for the first time, that sharks visit shallow tropical reefs or ‘seamounts’, to benefit from  cleaning services and rid themselves of cumbersome parasites.  The strategy is risky however, since by being there, they become vulnerable to interference from human activity.

Publication date: 15 March 2011

Researchers reveal that thresher sharks use tail-slaps to hunt

Scientists have shown that thresher sharks hunt schooling fish by bullwhipping their tails hard enough to maim and kill several prey at once, according to research published in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Dr Simon Oliver, Dr John Turner and Tim D’Urban Jackson from Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences, and Klemens Gann and Medel Silvosa of the Thresher Shark Research and Conservation Project in the Philippines.

Publication date: 12 July 2013

Researching changes to our Arctic Ocean

Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences is leading one of 12 major research projects to have successfully bid to carry out crucial research in one of the most inhospitable regions on the planet- the Arctic.

The joint-funding for the work comes to the University from the UK’s Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and Germany’s Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) under the Changing Arctic Ocean project.

Dr Yueng-Djern Lenn, a Senior Lecturer in Physical Oceanography at the School of Ocean Sciences is to lead the new three-year research project with partners and collaborating institutions. The aim is to increase understanding of how changes within our oceans might affect the quantity of phytoplankton produced in the Arctic Ocean.

Publication date: 3 July 2018

Research partnership projects under the spotlight

Some exciting projects involving Bangor University academics working in partnership with communities, charities, government bodies, and businesses – both local and international – are being highlighted at Bangor University this Friday (8 December).

In all, seventeen of 52 projects funded through an ESRC (Economic and Social Research Council) Impact Acceleration Account at Bangor University are featured at the event.

Publication date: 7 December 2017

Revealing what lies beneath...

Have you ever looked out to sea from somewhere on the Welsh coast and wondered how that view would seem if the water was somehow magically taken away?  Well, thanks to recent results from a Bangor University project called SEACAMS, part financed through the Welsh European Funding Office, this has become a reality for some iconic coastal locations across Wales.

Publication date: 28 April 2016

Rip currents are a natural hazard along our coasts – here's how to spot them

Rip currents are found along most coastlines, and where they form near popular beaches they can be deadly. The journalist Decca Aitkenhead has written movinglyabout how quickly life can change after her husband was swept out to sea by a rip current while rescuing their son.

Publication date: 27 July 2016

Rocky platforms dissipating wave energy – a new option for coastal defence?

Communities across Wales are coming to terms with the very real threat of coastal flooding as the Welsh Government announces that as many as 48 areas have been identified where coastal defences will not be maintained in the long term.

With that stark reality in mind, scientists in Wales are contributing their expertise to obtain a clearer picture of the waves and storm surges hitting our coasts, so that they can gain a greater understand of the energy within waves and how a wave’s power can be dissipated.

Publication date: 25 November 2014

Royal Support for Scaling Up Collaborative Coral Reef Conservation

Recently, HRH The Prince of Wales, drew attention to the economic drivers behind coral reef degradation and the investments required to ensure the long-term health of these vital marine habitats.  Professor John Turner and Dr Gareth Williams from the School of Ocean Sciences were among an invited audience of UN envoys, ambassadors, financiers, conservationists and reef managers to raise the urgency of scaling up resilience and recovery of the world’s coral reefs, with a particular focus on the role of the private sector and philanthropy.

Publication date: 1 March 2018

Safeguarding seafood by managing our seas

The increasing concerns about ‘food security’ for the UK, alongside dwindling public investment in fisheries research has led some to question how we can meet future knowledge needs to sustainably manage our seas.

Scientists at Bangor University's School of Ocean Sciences argue that despite their economic importance to the UK fisheries sector, not enough is known about scallop fisheries in the UK.

Publication date: 18 February 2014

Satisfied students place Bangor University among top UK universities

Bangor University’s students have again given the University a resounding testimonial in the annual National Student Satisfaction survey, placing the University eighth among the UK’s non-specialist universities in the UK and second among Welsh Universities.

The news follows hard on the heels of the University’s recent success in being awarded a Gold Standard in the UK Government’s new Teaching Excellence Framework, the only Welsh university to achieve this standard.

Publication date: 9 August 2017

Saving our scallops: Arran reserve reveals marine protection works

An article by Bryce Stewart, University of York and Leigh Howarth, of our School of Ocean Sciences on The Conversation.

Last summer, on the Isle of Arran, off the west coast of Scotland, we watched an excited young lad walking down to the water’s edge, fishing rod in hand. Sadly, his chances of catching anything were slim to remote.

 

Publication date: 15 April 2015

School of Ocean Sciences staff feature on BBC Radio Wales Science Cafe Programme

BBC Radio Wales' Science Cafe will feature the work of climate researchers at the School of Ocean Sciences in a half-hour programme to be broadcast next Tuesday (14th August) at 7pm.

Publication date: 10 August 2012

Scientific first: Thresher sharks hunt with their tails

It has long been suspected that thresher sharks hunt with their scythe-like tails but how has been poorly understood.

Publication date: 11 July 2013

Scientists call for more research on how human activities affect the seabed

A group of UK scientists, co-ordinated by the University of Southampton, has published extensive research into how industry and environmental change are affecting our seafloors, but say more work is needed to help safeguard these complex ecosystems and the benefits they provide to people for the future.

Publication date: 25 September 2017

Scientists can now predict coral feeding habits from space

New research has revealed that tropical corals living in more productive waters take advantage of the increased food availability and that these feeding habits can be predicted from satellites orbiting our planet.

Publication date: 18 October 2018

Scientists predict sea states for renewable energy

Tidal and wave technology is finally coming of age and the UK leads the world in the development of this vital renewable energy resource. Bangor University is playing a crucial role in this: as the industry moves towards large-scale commercialisation, experts at the University’s Centre for Applied Marine Sciences are working to maximise the operational efficiencies of energy-generating devices.

Publication date: 11 December 2013

Sea Shells and climate change 3rd International Sclerochronology Conference (ISC2013) Caernarfon, North Wales, UK - Sunday 19th May to Wednesday 22nd May 2013

A major international conference is being hosted at the Galeri in Caernarfon by scientists at Bangor University.  Scientists from around the world – including Japan, Australia, India, the Falkland Islands, Canada and the USA as well as all parts of Europe and the UK - will be talking about how they use shells, corals and bones to study past and present changes in the marine environment.  Topics include the marine climate of the past, biology, ecosystems, fisheries and archaeology.

Publication date: 17 May 2013

Sea urchins from Antarctica show adaptation to ocean acidification

A study of sea urchins from the Antarctic Peninsula has revealed an ability to adapt to changing conditions such as rising sea temperature and acidification. Writing in the Journal of Animal Ecology the authors set out to answer important and fundamental questions on how life in the ocean will respond to projected changes in the coming decades.

Despite evidence of increasing acidification of the world’s oceans, questions remain over whether marine species will be able to adapt to these changing conditions. This latest study, led by scientists from the British Antarctic Survey and Bangor University, is one of the longest ever conducted.

Publication date: 9 December 2014

Sêr Cymru National Research Network for Low Carbon, Energy and Environment

Director Appointed to the Welsh Government’s Sêr Cymru National Research Network for Low Carbon, Energy and Environment

Publication date: 24 February 2014

"Seren" on Bangor's Polar Symposium

Publication date: 20 February 2013

Solving one of the great mysteries surrounding the moon

Dr Mattias Green of Bangor University, in collaboration with researchers from Royal Holloway, University of London, have netted a research grant worth £520K from the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) to tackle a major question in the understanding of the history of the moon.

Publication date: 2 April 2019

Sourcing sustainable Irish Sea mussels

When the UK’s largest exporting mussel fleet heads out to sea later this month, it will be in search of valuable seed mussels that they will then bring back to the Menai Strait to grow on before collection for export.

If a new Irish Sea research project is successful, this may be one of the last times the fleet need to set out from Bangor’s Port Penrhyn to search for seed mussels.

Publication date: 17 March 2017

Starfish can see in the dark (among other amazing abilities)

If you go down to the shore today, you’re sure of a big surprise. Many will have witnessed the presence of a starfish or two when visiting the seashore or a public aquarium. Starfish come in an exciting range of colours and sizes, but have you ever given a thought to how this multi-armed wonder manages to exist in our oceans when it’s so unlike the other animals we know?

This article by Coleen Suckling, Lecturer in Marine Biology, at the School of Ocean Sciences was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 16 February 2018

Sticky mud and biological goo hold key to predicting coastal erosion

Scientists have taken a huge step towards developing a more reliable way of predicting how climate change will impact estuaries and coastal environments.

Working as part of a collaborative project, led by Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences, to assess how fine materials such as mud and sand are moved by water currents around our coastline, and how this movement could change as the result of climate change, Professor Dan Parsons, of Hull University, has pinpointed key ingredients currently missing from the models which help scientists and engineers predict the way coasts and estuaries will be shaped in the future.

Publication date: 29 February 2016

Student Led Teaching Awards 2015

The Student Led Teaching Awards returned bigger than ever for its 4th annual ceremony, along with the much anticipated Course Representative awards

Publication date: 21 May 2015

Student research on freshwater microplastics hits the headlines

Research conducted by students at Bangor University, working with Friends of the Earth, has attracted global media attention.

Bangor University was commissioned by the environmental organization, to measure the amount of plastics and microplastics in British lakes and rivers- and what they found was widely reported in print and broadcast media across Britain and beyond.

Publication date: 3 April 2019

Student Selected for National Swimming Championships

Third year Bangor University Marine Biology students Leo Johnson has qualified for the 100m Freestyle at the National Open Short Course Disability Swimming Championships 2013 to be held  at the Ponds Forge International Swimming Pool in Sheffield on 23-24 November 2013. This event will feature the best para- swimmers from across Great Britain.

Publication date: 24 October 2013

Study reveals long time scale of recovery for marine sea fans and other species

Pink seafans, Ross corals and white sea squirts could take up to 20 years to recover after an area of the seabed was closed to scallop dredging, according to predictions by a team of scientists at Bangor University.

Publication date: 26 January 2018

Successful conclusion to Sustainable Fisheries Resources Project

A three year data gathering project to help Welsh fishers work sustainably culminated with a presentation at Bangor University recently.

Publication date: 3 June 2015

Supercontinent formation may be linked to a cycle of supertides

Earth’s crust is made up of fractured slabs of rock, like a broken shell on an egg. These plates move around at speeds of about 5cm per year – and eventually this movement brings all the continents together and form what is known as a supercontinent. The last supercontinent on Earth was Pangaea, which existed between 300-180m years ago.

This collection and dispersion of the continents is known as a supercontinent cycle, and the world now is 180m years into the current cycle. It is predicted that the next supercontinent will form in about 250m years, when the Atlantic and Pacific oceans both close and a new ocean forms where the large Asian plate splits. 

This article by Mattias Green, Reader in Physical Oceanography at the School of Ocean Sciences was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 12 April 2018

Teaming up for cheaper energy from ocean tides

Oceanographers at Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences are launching a major project to study tidal turbulence at the Menai Strait in Wales. Just how can this project help reduce development costs, leading to cheaper energy from the tides?

Ocean energy represents a vast and largely untapped renewable energy resource. The global market for marine energy has been estimated to be worth around £76 billion between 2016 and 2050, according to numbers released by the Carbon Trust.

To access this source of energy, oceanographers at Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences have been awarded two major grants totalling £230k to study ocean turbulence. The aim is to help improve the design and operation of tidal energy capture devices.

Publication date: 25 April 2017

Tens of thousands of dead fish just washed up on a Cornish beach – here's why

This article by Prof Michel KaiserSchool of Ocean Sciences was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

It must have been an incredibly morbid sight. Walkers on Marazion beach in Cornwall, at the south-western tip of mainland Britain, recently discovered tens of thousands of dead fish had been washed ashore overnight. One eyewitness told the Plymouth Herald the fish stretched “as far as the eye could see”.

People speculated that pollution or natural predators such as dolphins or porpoises chasing the fish ashore may be to blame. But a much simpler explanation soon unfolded when the Cornish Sardine Management Association said that one of its vessels had been fishing close inshore and had had to release one of its catches for safety reasons.

Exactly what happened in this case remains unclear. But why would a ship ever need to dump fish for safety reasons? After all, catching lots of fish is surely the entire point. In any case, a European Union discard ban was first implemented in 2015 in order to stop this sort of thing.

Publication date: 22 December 2016

Ten years after the Thames whale, how are Britain’s sea mammals faring?

This article by Peter Evans Honorary Senior Lecturer, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article

The British Isles are blessed with a wide variety of sea mammals, with records showing 29 species of whales, porpoises and dolphins and seven species of seals in its waters. But only some of these are regular inhabitants, and when the more unusual species make an appearance it can cause considerable public interest – as happened ten years ago when a northern bottlenose whale, normally found in the deep Atlantic, instead swam up the River Thames in front of the Houses of Parliament and tens of thousands of fascinated onlookers.

Publication date: 19 January 2016

The Appliance of Science!

Bangor University’s Science Festival is back for its seventh year and welcomes everyone to explore and discuss science through talks hands-on activities exhibitions demonstrations - all free to attend.

Publication date: 16 February 2017

The Appliance of Science!

Bangor University’s Science Festival is back for its seventh year and welcomes everyone to explore and discuss science through talks hands-on activities exhibitions demonstrations - all free to attend.

Publication date: 7 March 2017

The oyster is their world- now they want you to consider the oyster

Aquaculture experts at Bangor University are hoping to initiate a sea-change in how oysters are considered and consumed at an international Oyster Symposium being held at the University (11-14 September). They hope that the event will encourage a rapid but sustainable increase in oyster production and consumption- at home and at oyster bars here in Wales and elsewhere.

Publication date: 30 August 2017

The secret life of Lugworms – ‘citizen scientists’ needed to help shed light on the sex-life of this important coastal species

Love is in the air along our coastlines this autumn and Bangor University is asking people in north Wales to keep an eye out for signs of passion in the lugworm population.

The lugworm – Arenicola marina - is a vital source of food for wader birds and fish, and the species plays an important role in fisheries as a source of bait.

Publication date: 28 September 2016

The vision of a new North Wales coast to harness power, protect the shoreline and boost tourism

Just imagine a major wall off the North Wales coast stretching from Llandudno, out to sea and then back to land near Prestatyn: sailing dinghies and wind surfers enjoying the calm waters within, thriving tourism, and support industries and local communities alleviated from the threat of coastal flooding.

Publication date: 4 April 2016

The wettest drought on record - the weather of 2012

Come along to Bangor University’s Main Arts Lecture Theatre, on Monday 24th June 2013, at 6.30pm and learn about “the wettest drought on record – the weather of 2012”.

This is a timely Lecture, considering the recent meeting of the UK’s leading meteorologists to discuss recent unusual weather patterns in the UK.

Publication date: 21 June 2013

The young Bangor fish entrepreneur who believes that any fin is possible

A 20 year old student at Bangor University is using his lifelong passion for marine biology to drive his ambitions to become the largest livestock supplier of fish species in the UK.

Sam Hamill, who is currently in his third year studying Marine Biology, is set to launch Big on Fish in November, an online shop and retail store selling aquarium equipment and stocking over 1100 exotic fish and coral species.

Publication date: 27 October 2017

Three Bangor research projects among top 20 contributing towards development

No fewer than three research projects at Bangor University have been selected from nearing 7,000 submissions to be included among the top 20 most impressive examples of UK research contributing to development.  

Publication date: 9 October 2015

Tidal range power plants hold potential for electricity generation

In theory, one third of global electricity needs could be provided by the world’s tidal range, according to a new comprehensive state-of-the-art review of tidal range power plants.

Publication date: 21 May 2018

Tides stir up deep Atlantic Heat in the Arctic Ocean

Researchers have identified how warm Atlantic water that is flowing deep into the Arctic Ocean is mixing with colder waters above to contribute to sea-ice loss in the Arctic. The results, published this week in the journal Nature Geoscience (16.2.14 10.1038/ngeo2350 ), show that tidal flows in the Arctic are causing deep, warm water (originating from the Gulf Stream) to mix with cold, fresh water lying above, in turn contributing to melting the floating sea-ice.

Publication date: 16 February 2015

Tiny organisms could change the face of coastal science

New scientific research published in the journal Nature Communications, led by researchers at Bangor University in collaboration with scientists from the National Oceanography Centre Liverpool and the Universities of St. Andrews, Hull, Leeds and Plymouth, has discovered that ‘sticky’ sugars produced by micro-organisms have a remarkably large effect on the movement of sand and mud in aquatic environments.

Publication date: 6 February 2015

Trawling makes for skinny flatfish

Trawling the seabed doesn’t just remove some of the fishes living there; it also makes some of the survivors thinner and less healthy by forcing them to use more energy finding less nutritious food.

That’s the conclusion of a new paper published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, based on the work Dr Andrew Frederick Johnson undertook while studying for his PhD at Bangor University. “We already knew that some species of bottom-dwelling fish in trawled areas were skinnier than those elsewhere, based on earlier work by Dr Jan Geert Hiddink (2011, Journal of Applied Ecology), but until now it was assumed this was because they couldn’t find enough food and went hungry”.

Publication date: 11 December 2014

UK and Germany combine forces to fund crucial Arctic science

Natural Environment Research Council- changing Artic Ocean Media release

For the first time, the UK and Germany have joined forces to investigate the impact of climate change on the Arctic Ocean.

The UK’s Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and Germany’s Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) have jointly invested almost £8 million in 12 new projects to carry out crucial research in one of the most inhospitable regions on the planet. The new projects start today and join the existing NERC Changing Arctic Ocean research programme, which aims to better understand – and predict – changes to the Arctic marine environment and ecosystems.

Publication date: 3 July 2018

UK Gov’s Environment Minister visits Bangor University

Bangor University’s School of Environment, Natural Resources and Geography hosted a visit by Dr Thérèse Coffey MP recently, who took part in roundtable discussions with staff and students involved in the school’s forestry programmes.

Publication date: 20 October 2017

UK viewers to get insight to life around the Menai Strait

Prime-time TV viewers across the UK are to get an opportunity to learn about the life around the Menai Strait as ITV Wales’ popular series The Strait is to be broadcast across the national channel re-titled as ‘The Island Strait’ and shown at 8.00 on ITV for four weeks from September 14.

The series looks at the lives of people who live and work on the Menai Strait- the magical stretch of sea that separates the Isle of Anglesey from mainland Wales. Among the individuals profiled in the series is Dr Mike Roberts, of Bangor University. Through the eyes of the cast of men and women who work in and around this dramatic and unique stretch of water, viewers get an opportunity to understand what an important environmental asset the Menai Strait really is.

Publication date: 7 September 2018

Understanding our Oceans

Bangor University’s Schools of Ocean Sciences, Electronic Engineering and Computer Science in collaboration with company partner Tidal Lagoon Power are looking for a computer science student to help them build an autonomous vehicle that will answer questions that have bugged ecologists and fisheries scientists for years – how and where do fish swim? The new project being developed by SEACAMS, Bangor University and funded by KESS 2 aims to track small marine fish to understand where  fish swim in a way that has previously only been applied to large sharks. 

Publication date: 7 August 2017

Understanding the conditions that foster coral reefs' caretaker fishes

This article by Adel HeenanNational Oceanic and Atmospheric AdministrationAndrew HoeyJames Cook UniversityGareth J. WilliamsSchool of Ocean Sciences Bangor University, and Ivor D. WilliamsNational Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Coral reefs are among the most valuable natural assets on Earth. They provide an estimated US$375 billion worth of goods and services every year, such as supporting fisheries and protecting coasts. But reefs face many stresses and shocks, from local threats like overfishing, habitat damage and pollution to the global impacts of climate change. Many scientists are working to identify management strategies that can effectively buffer reefs against the array of threats that challenge them.

Publication date: 30 November 2016

University degrees lead to Canada

After an initial bumpy ride into higher education, a prizewinning student graduates for the second time from Bangor University this week.

Publication date: 20 July 2017

Urgency scientific expedition to assess climate induced death of coral reefs

A team of scientists led by a Bangor University professor have recently returned from a scientific expedition to the remote and largely uninhabited Chagos Archipelago in the British Indian Ocean Territory (BIOT).

Publication date: 12 May 2017

Volunteer network to blitz shores around the UK this summer

A series of special events next month will see members of the public join together in building a more accurate picture of the diversity of marine life around the UK’s coastline.

Scientists are working with a trained army of ‘citizen scientists’ during the upcoming ‘CoCoast Unite’ weekend, taking place between World Ocean’s Day Thursday 8 June – Sunday 11 June at locations across the UK. This call to arms will gather vital information about the variety and abundance of intertidal species living on our rocky seashores.  Moelfre beach is just one of the locations across north Wales and the UK where members of the public will be taking part in a ‘citizen science’ project to build a more accurate picture of the diversity of marine life around the UK’s coastline. 

Publication date: 5 June 2017

Wales-Ireland co-operation sees launch of BlueFish Project

Researchers, industry representatives and commercial producers from both sides of the Irish Sea congregated in Bangor University on Tuesday to officially launch the BlueFish Project, a collaboration between Wales and Ireland that will examine the effect of climate change on fish and shellfish sustainability in the Irish Sea.

Publication date: 28 September 2017

WANTED: budding scientists to capture our coast

People with a passion for the UK’s coastline are being invited to help make history by being part of the largest coastal marine citizen science project ever undertaken.

The £1.7m Capturing Our Coast project, funded through the Heritage Lottery Fund, is designed to further our understanding of the abundance and distribution of marine life around the UK

Publication date: 12 January 2016

Welsh universities announce new national supercomputing research facility

A new £15m supercomputing programme of investment has been announced by universities across Wales.

Part-funded by the European Regional Development Fund through the Welsh Government, ‘Supercomputing Wales’ will enable the country to compete globally for research and innovation that requires state-of-the-art computing facilities to simulate and solve complex scientific problems.

Publication date: 28 April 2017

We opened up all our data on coral reefs – more scientists should do the same to protect habitats

Coral reefs are critically important to the world but despite the ongoing efforts of scientists and campaigners, these stunningly beautiful ecosystems still face a variety of threats. The most pervasive is, of course, climate change, which is putting their very future in jeopardy.

This article by Adel Heenan, Postdoctoral fellow, School of Ocean SciencesBangor University and Ivor D. Williams, Coral Reef Ecologist, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 29 January 2018

We're mapping wartime shipwrecks to explore the past – and help develop green energy projects

Wartime shipwrecks such as the USS Juneau – recently discovered in the Pacific Ocean by philanthropist Paul Allen and his team – are of great interest to both military historians and the general public. 

Many such wrecks lie in extremely deep, relatively clear waters and are the legacy of naval battles fought far out to sea. But some of the technologies and methods that are being used to locate and identify such sites are now being employed by scientists in shallower, sediment-rich UK waters for similar – and very different – purposes.

This article by Michael Roberts, SEACAMS R&D Project Manager, Centre for Applied Marine Sciences, at the School of Ocean Sciences, was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 27 March 2018

We tracked coral feeding habits from space to find out which reefs could be more resilient

Coral reefs are an invaluable source of food, economic revenue, and protection for millions of people worldwide. The three-dimensional structures built by corals also provide nourishment and shelter for over a quarter of all marine organisms.

i,But coral populations are threatened by a multitude of local and global stressors. Rising ocean temperatures are disrupting the 210m-year-old symbiosis between corals and microscopic algae. When temperatures rise, the coral animal becomes stressed and expels its algal partners, in a process known as coral bleaching.

This article by Michael D. Fox, Postdoctoral Scholar, University of California San DiegoAndrew Frederick Johnson, Researcher at Scripps Insitution of Oceanography & Director of MarFishEco, University of California San Diego, and Gareth J. Williams, Lecturer, Marine BiologyBangor University is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 22 October 2018

What 500-year-old clams can tell us about climate change

You probably don’t think clams are the most exciting animals on the planet. But anyone who dismisses these marine bivalve molluscs surely cannot be aware of just how important they actually are. Without knowing it, they have taught us so much about the world we live in – and how it used to be.

Publication date: 7 December 2016

What causes mass whale strandings?

This article by Peter Evans, Honorary Senior Lecturer, School of Ocean Sciences was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Around 600 pilot whales recently became stranded on a New Zealand beach, around 400 of which died before volunteers could refloat them back into the sea. Sadly, this kind of mass whale stranding has occurred since human records began, and happens somewhere in the world on a regular basis.

Publication date: 15 February 2017

What does gathering from the seashore mean to the modern hunter gatherer

Liz Morris-Webb, a researcher at Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences is looking for people who gather from the seashores of Wales to take part in her research.  If you forage for food, bait, money, education, medicine, research or something more unusual, you can take part.

Publication date: 5 December 2018

What planet Earth might look like when the next supercontinent forms – four scenarios

The outer layer of the Earth, the solid crust we walk on, is made up of broken pieces, much like the shell of a broken egg. These pieces, the tectontic plates, move around the planet at speeds of a few centimetres per year. Every so often they come together and combine into a supercontinent, which remains for a few hundred million years before breaking up. The plates then disperse or scatter and move away from each other, until they eventually – after another 400-600 million years – come back together again.

This article by Mattias Green, Reader in Physical Oceanography, Bangor UniversityHannah Sophia Davies, PhD Researcher, Universidade de Lisboa , and Joao C. Duarte, Researcher and Coordinator of the Marine Geology and Geophysics Group, Universidade de Lisboa is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 27 November 2018

What seabirds can tell us about the tide

When the UK's Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) set out to tag razorbills, their aim was to track their behaviour and movements along the coast of North Wales. The tag data revealed that, at night, these seabirds spent a lot of their time idle on the sea surface. "We saw this as an opportunity to re-use the data and test if the birds might be drifting with the tidal current," says Matt Cooper, a Master of Oceanography graduate from Bangor University in Wales. It turns out they were, according to a new study led by Cooper that shows the potential of using seabirds to measure ocean currents. The results are published today in the European Geosciences Union journal Ocean Science.

Publication date: 29 November 2018

Why are we getting these warm wild winds?

Is there a cold winter on the way?

Whilst our weather has warmed in the last couple of days with the arrival of mild westerly winds from the Atlantic, there are indications further afield which may point to a cold winter for Wales.

Scientists monitoring ocean conditions over the tropical Pacific Ocean have detected a warming of the surface water which is a strong indicator of the onset of a major global climate event, known as an “El Nino”.

Publication date: 29 November 2018

Why foraging for free is food for the soul

 In the past few years, there’s been a resurgence in the idea of foraging for food. The practice of hand gathering plants and animals for bait, money or the table has long taken place, but more recently top chefs have been popularising the idea, while urban foragers have told of the lengths they go to to find wild food in big cities.

This article by PhD candidate at the School of Ocean SciencesElisabeth S. Morris-Webb, is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 10 January 2019

Women in Science Scholarships Awarded

Two ‘Women in Science’ Scholarships have been awarded to outstanding Bangor University students – Hannah Davies and Lily Stokes. Both were undergraduate students at Bangor and graduated with First Class Honours in July 2017. The scholarships, which cover the full course fees, will enable the talented and enthusiastic students to continue their studies and the recipients of these scholarships are now enrolled in postgraduate research courses at Bangor.

Publication date: 26 March 2018

Work on past climates to be recognised by Award

The oldest Geological Society in the world, The Geological Society of London, has recognized the scientific contribution of Dr Paul Butler, of Bangor University’s renowned School of Ocean Sciences, with the award of the 2014 Lyell Fund.

Publication date: 5 March 2014

World’s largest ever fishing impact study brings hope for Cardigan Bay Scallop fishermen

Scientists from Bangor University, working together with the Welsh Fishermen’s AssociationWelsh Government and Natural Resources Wales have published their findings from the world’s largest ever fishing impact study, funded in part by the European Fishery Fund.

Publication date: 13 August 2015

World War One U-boat partnership project gets green light from Heritage Lottery Fund for Wales’ Year of the Sea, 2018

The Heritage Lottery Fund has announced a grant of £409,700 for the Royal Commission’s partnership project: Commemorating the Forgotten U-boat War around the Welsh Coast, 1914-18.  Thanks to money raised by National Lottery players, over the next two years the project will use the latest imaging techniques to reveal underwater wrecks from the Great War, and will support coastal communities around Wales to tell their previously untold stories about the Great War at Sea.

Publication date: 15 November 2017

Would seasonal forecasting enable us to cope with our changing weather?

We’ve experienced an exceptionally wet and windy winter, and while our weather forecasters are far better at telling us what to expect in the next two or three days, they still struggle with long range seasonal forecasting.

Work conducted since the 1970’s at Bangor University has contributed significantly to the models used by climate forecasters and others. The work has focused on understanding marine turbulence in the last two decades. The Ocean Physics group at the School of Ocean Sciences  have won over £6 million in research funding to further their work since 2007.

Publication date: 28 February 2014

Year of the Sea Lecture Series now available online Watch your favourite lecture again, or catch up with those you missed

The School of Ocean Sciences marked the 2018 Year of the Sea with a special series of lectures hosted by the Mostyn Gallery in Llandudno.

Publication date: 21 January 2019

Zoology degree delight for Victoria

Victoria Ella Warren, 21, from Loughborough, is graduating from Bangor University with a first class BSc in Marine Vertebrate Zoology this week.

Publication date: 12 July 2013